Dwight D. Eisenhower
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Primary Doc. #3: Eisenhower's D-Day Failure Message

Primary Doc. #3: Eisenhower's D-Day Failure Message | Dwight D. Eisenhower | Scoop.it
Daysha Rothschild's insight:

This letter was written just in case things didn't go as planned during the invasion on the Cherbourg-Harve area. If the mission was to fail he was going to send this message back to the states to inform them of what happened. He wrote that he withdraw the troops and took full blame for the failed invasion. 

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Primary Doc. #1: Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force

Primary Doc. #1: Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force | Dwight D. Eisenhower | Scoop.it
Daysha Rothschild's insight:

In this letter Dwight D. Eisenhower is wishing those that are taking part in war good luck. He's also informing them that the enemy isn't unprepared, but the Home Front has provided them with the weapons and protection need to be victorious. 

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Website #2: Dwight D. Eisenhower

Website #2: Dwight D. Eisenhower | Dwight D. Eisenhower | Scoop.it
Find out more about Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander during WWII and the 34th U.S. president.
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During WW2 Dwight D. Eisenhower was served as Supreme Commander of Allied forces in Western Europe. He led a massive invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe that began on D-Day. In 1952 while he was in command of NATO forces in Europe when leading Republicans convinced him to run for president. During his time as president Eisenhower strengthened Social Security and created the massive new Interstate Highway System. He also ended the war in Korea in 1953.
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Primary Doc. #2: Victory Order of the Day, 1945 | The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

Primary Doc. #2: Victory Order of the Day, 1945 | The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History | Dwight D. Eisenhower | Scoop.it
Daysha Rothschild's insight:

Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote the Victory Order of the Day to not only encourage troops to celebrate their but also remember those troop who didn't live to see this glorious day. Before the end of the war U.S. troops killed over 5,000,000 of the enemy. 

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Website #3: Dwight D. Eisenhower Biography

Website #3: Dwight D. Eisenhower Biography | Dwight D. Eisenhower | Scoop.it
Dwight D. Eisenhower was the 34th president of the United States who promoted Atoms for Peace during the Cold War. Learn more at Biography.com.
Daysha Rothschild's insight:

The first few years of Eisenhower’s military career he moved fro post to post throughout Texas, Georgia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New Jersey with Mamie, his wife.  He was promoted to major in 1920 after volunteering for the Tanks Corps, in the War Department’s first transcontinental motor convoy, the previous year.  After the tragic death of his firstborn son, Doug Dwight, Eisenhower became executive officer to General Fox Conner in the Panama Canal Zone. In 1924 Eisenhower applied to the Army’s prestigious graduate school, the Command and General Staff School at Ft, Leavenworth, and was accepted. From 1927 to 1929 he toured and reported for the War Department, under General John Pershing. 

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Website #1: Dwight D. Eisenhower | The White House

Website #1: Dwight D. Eisenhower | The White House | Dwight D. Eisenhower | Scoop.it
Daysha Rothschild's insight:

Dwight D. Eisenhower was a General before he became the president. As President Eisenhower focused mainly on bettering the United States as a nation. He was persuaded to run for President by Republican emissaries to his headquarters near Paris. He urged the necessity of maintaining an adequate military strength before he left office in January 1961.  He cautioned that vast, long-continued military expenditures could breed potential dangers to our way of life. 

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