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Your Massively Open Offline College Is Broken

Your Massively Open Offline College Is Broken | DustinSantana | Scoop.it

"The end game is degrees that are little more than receipts for work done elsewhere. Empire State, Excelsior, Thomas Edison, all these institutions and more convert a loose set of credits into a diploma, without much of anything resembling a curriculum. A kid named Richard Linder just figured out how to get an Associates Degree by stitching together 60 credits from 8 separate institutions, not one credit of which was earned in a college classroom. (Fully a quarter were from various forms of FEMA certification.) Linder gets an A for moxie, but it doesn’t say much for the institutions nominally policing educational coherence.

 

This vitiation of the diploma is Goodhart’s Law in action, where a socially useful metric becomes increasingly worthless, because the incentives pushing towards adulteration are larger than those pushing towards purity. This is not some bad thing that was done to us in the academy. We did this to ourselves, under the rubric of ordinary accreditation, at nonprofits and state schools. Yet I've never once heard the professors fulminating about MOOCs also suggest shutting down Excelsior College. In the academy, we are terrible at combating threats from the current educational system, but we are terrific at combating threats to it.

 

The thing to understand about the current conversation is how bad things were, for how many students, long before organizations like University of the People ever launched. In the academy, we’ve been running a grey market in unsupervised internships and larger and larger lectures for a generation already. MOOCs threaten that market."


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:16 AM

Did you see what he did there, in that title?


Provocative prose from one of the most renowned Internet observers, Clay Shirky.

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Massive Open Online Courses Prove Popular, if Not Lucrative Yet | NYT

Massive Open Online Courses Prove Popular, if Not Lucrative Yet | NYT | DustinSantana | Scoop.it
New companies are partnering with universities to offer online courses, in an effort that could define the future of higher education — if anyone can figure out how to make money.

Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 7, 2013 7:01 AM

“'Monetization is not the most important objective for this business at this point,' said Scott Sandell, a Coursera financier who is a general partner at New Enterprise Associates. 'What is important is that Coursera is rapidly accumulating a body of high-quality content that could be very attractive to universities that want to license it for their own use. We invest with a very long mind-set, and the gestation period of the very best companies is at least 10 years.'

But with the first trickles of revenue now coming in, Coursera’s university partners expect to see some revenue sooner."

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Survey finds online enrollments slow but continue to grow | Inside Higher Ed

Survey finds online enrollments slow but continue to grow | Inside Higher Ed | DustinSantana | Scoop.it

"Annual survey finds that enrollments in online courses and programs grew at 9.3 percent rate, lowest level in a decade -- and that campus officials don't know what to make of MOOCs."


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 8, 2013 5:03 PM

Good story by Doug Lederman, with some excellent sharts and graphs. He concludes:


Among other highlights of the survey:
 

  • Nearly 7 in 10 chief academic leaders (69.1 percent) now say that online learning is critical to their long-term strategy. And just 11.2 percent say it is not.
  • More than three-quarters (77.0 percent) of chief academic officers rate the learning outcomes in online education as the same or superior to those in face-to-face courses, up from 57.2 percent when Babson first asked the question in 2003.
  • Fewer than a third (30.2 percent) of CAOs believe that faculty members on their campuses accept the value and legitimacy of online education -- lower than the rate in 2004.