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Interdisciplinary Collaboration on Campus: Five Questions

Interdisciplinary Collaboration on Campus: Five Questions | DustinSantana | Scoop.it

In recent decades, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes for Health (NIH), and the National Academies (2004) have all called for more interdisciplinary scholarship to respond to compelling global problems (Klein, 2010; Rhoten & Pfirman, 2007). Moreover, many campus administrators see interdisciplinary collaboration, particularly in teaching and research, as a strategy for capitalizing on scarce resources and procuring more in the future.

 

So the siren's song of interdisciplinarity is difficult for many colleges and universities to resist. At the same time, the literature on interdisciplinary collaboration warns of the many challenges that


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 2, 2013 3:06 PM

A valuable read for planners. The five questions are these:


  • Do You Have Enough Time?
  • Do You Have the Right People?
  • Do You Have the Right Departments?
  • Do You Have the Right Policies?
  • Do You Have Sufficient Resources?


There are practical implications. And, does this resonate with you?


I see two types of people come out of graduate school: People who are so imbued with their disciplinary perspective that they're purists in a way that they'll give up as they go along, but also some people who are more open to looking at things in multiple ways. Those people have to worry about job security and they don't have very much clout in the system. So the very people who might be able to create change are disadvantaged in being able to produce that change.

Rescooped by DustinSantana from SCUP Links
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Interdisciplinary Collaboration on Campus: Five Questions

Interdisciplinary Collaboration on Campus: Five Questions | DustinSantana | Scoop.it

In recent decades, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes for Health (NIH), and the National Academies (2004) have all called for more interdisciplinary scholarship to respond to compelling global problems (Klein, 2010; Rhoten & Pfirman, 2007). Moreover, many campus administrators see interdisciplinary collaboration, particularly in teaching and research, as a strategy for capitalizing on scarce resources and procuring more in the future.

 

So the siren's song of interdisciplinarity is difficult for many colleges and universities to resist. At the same time, the literature on interdisciplinary collaboration warns of the many challenges that


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
more...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 2, 2013 3:06 PM

A valuable read for planners. The five questions are these:


  • Do You Have Enough Time?
  • Do You Have the Right People?
  • Do You Have the Right Departments?
  • Do You Have the Right Policies?
  • Do You Have Sufficient Resources?


There are practical implications. And, does this resonate with you?


I see two types of people come out of graduate school: People who are so imbued with their disciplinary perspective that they're purists in a way that they'll give up as they go along, but also some people who are more open to looking at things in multiple ways. Those people have to worry about job security and they don't have very much clout in the system. So the very people who might be able to create change are disadvantaged in being able to produce that change.

Rescooped by DustinSantana from SCUP Links
Scoop.it!

Interdisciplinary Collaboration on Campus: Five Questions

Interdisciplinary Collaboration on Campus: Five Questions | DustinSantana | Scoop.it

In recent decades, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes for Health (NIH), and the National Academies (2004) have all called for more interdisciplinary scholarship to respond to compelling global problems (Klein, 2010; Rhoten & Pfirman, 2007). Moreover, many campus administrators see interdisciplinary collaboration, particularly in teaching and research, as a strategy for capitalizing on scarce resources and procuring more in the future.

 

So the siren's song of interdisciplinarity is difficult for many colleges and universities to resist. At the same time, the literature on interdisciplinary collaboration warns of the many challenges that


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
more...
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 2, 2013 3:06 PM

A valuable read for planners. The five questions are these:


  • Do You Have Enough Time?
  • Do You Have the Right People?
  • Do You Have the Right Departments?
  • Do You Have the Right Policies?
  • Do You Have Sufficient Resources?


There are practical implications. And, does this resonate with you?


I see two types of people come out of graduate school: People who are so imbued with their disciplinary perspective that they're purists in a way that they'll give up as they go along, but also some people who are more open to looking at things in multiple ways. Those people have to worry about job security and they don't have very much clout in the system. So the very people who might be able to create change are disadvantaged in being able to produce that change.

Rescooped by DustinSantana from SCUP Links
Scoop.it!

NACUBO: High Tech, High Stakes

NACUBO: High Tech, High Stakes | DustinSantana | Scoop.it

From operational efficiencies to transformational processes, information technology's role at colleges and universities demands top-tier leadership. Here are some areas where the CBO's steady oversight and involvement can be IT game changers.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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