Dust Bowl:Dirty Thirties
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Dust Bowl:Dirty Thirties
Harsh conditions during the black blizzard and harsh blowing sand storms.
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iMovie

iMovie with 10 photos, 3 minutes goes here after you upload it to YouTube

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Those Terrible Dust Bowl Days by Marilyn Lott

Those Terrible Dust Bowl Days by Marilyn Lott | Dust Bowl:Dirty Thirties | Scoop.it
Those Terrible Dust Bowl Days - by Marilyn Lott.
Nissa Herrera's insight:

Here above is a poem written by a lady, her poem makes me personally feel as if i was there. She even asks what would you do or feel if this was to happen to you? Back then people went through alot, the one that i thought was the most sadest was when she says "Folks lost new babies in the cold." That must've been terrifying to lose your child from cold hard winters to the sandy dust bowl days. If this were to happen to me im not sure what i would do, i would probably go crazy. Having to wake up every morning and have dust in my eyes or in my chest, that would be hard. To have dust in my food when i eat, or clean and realize the dust just swoops right back on everything. To not be able to go outside and play no more. That would be hard. Im not sure how the survivors of the dust bowl did it but they are some couragoues people. 

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Nissa Herrera's comment, February 25, 2013 8:34 AM
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Dust Bowl Days | EDSITEment

This lesson introduces students to this dramatic era in our nation's history through photographs, songs and interviews with people who lived through the Dust Bowl.
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Here above is another poem written by Woody Guthrie, she describes the dust bowl as deathlike black clouds and left a dreadful track. She says that the storm took place at sundown and lasted through the night. When they looked out there windows that morning they saw a terrible sight. What once was there wheat field is now an ocean full of dust. It covered up there tractors it covered up there fences and covered up there barns. She says that in the end they hopped in there "Jalopies" and left and never turned bacl again. 

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Nissa Herrera's comment, February 25, 2013 8:34 AM
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'The Dust Bowl' review: Relevant but dry

'The Dust Bowl' review: Relevant but dry | Dust Bowl:Dirty Thirties | Scoop.it
It was the worst man-made environmental disaster in the nation's history, but unlike other calamities of nature, this one took only 40 or 50 years to create.
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Nissa Herrera's comment, February 25, 2013 8:34 AM
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Dust Bowl Documentary

Documentary video about the American Dust Bowl in the 1930's. For an Honors Geography project. *Music in the video is from "Mexico" by Incubus, and "Stand Up...
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Here is a Documentary on the dust bowl, it shows where, when, and what had happend during this tragic time.

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Nissa Herrera's comment, February 25, 2013 8:35 AM
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Vocabulary Words

Primary Documents- 10 words with sentences and definitions:

 

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DUST BOWL

DUST BOWL | Dust Bowl:Dirty Thirties | Scoop.it
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This Primary talks about the dust bowl and when it occurred during the 1930s. This document says that this dust bowl moment is the most severe event ever. some of the droughts lasted 2 years. It says that from 1909-1929 farmers broken out 32 million acres of sod in the plains. Once the farmers tore up the soil, then came the harsh winds and thats what caused the horrible storms. the winds picked up the dirt and caused tornados full of dust. the winds were so hard that if farmers or people were outside then you would get blown away. 

 

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Nathan Cushenbery-Andrews's comment, February 7, 2013 12:17 PM
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Letters From the Dust Bowl

Letters From the Dust Bowl | Dust Bowl:Dirty Thirties | Scoop.it
When drought struck Oklahoma in the 1930s, the author and her husband stayed behind to protect their 28-year-old farm. Her letters to a friend paint a picture of dire poverty, desiccated soil, and long days with no sunshine.
Nissa Herrera's insight:

This Document is a written letter by Caroline Henderson. Caroline Henderson and her husband were one of the very few survivors of the dust bowl. Caroline writes to a lady named Evenlyn 

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The Dust Bowl of the 1930s

The Dust Bowl of the 1930s | Dust Bowl:Dirty Thirties | Scoop.it
Nissa Herrera's insight:

This document here shows and talks about how it became the dust storm, from the farmers ripping the soil, and harsh winds. A couple of survivors tell you what they had to do during this storm. One man wanted to buy a tractor but couldnt because it was piled up full of dust.

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Nathan Cushenbery-Andrews's comment, February 7, 2013 12:19 PM
Should be 7 sentences.
Nissa Herrera's comment, February 25, 2013 8:35 AM
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Dust Bowl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands in the 1930s, particularly in 1934 and 1936. The phenomenon was caused by severe drought combined with farming methods that did not include crop rotation, fallow fields, cover crops, soil terracing and wind-breaking trees to prevent wind erosion.[1] Extensive deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains in the preceding decade had displaced the natural deep-rooted grasses that normally kept the soil in place and trapped moisture even during periods of drought and high winds. Rapid mechanization of farm implements, especially small gasoline tractors and widespread use of the harvester-combine were significant in the decisions to convert grassland (much of which received no more than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year) to cultivated cropland.

During the drought of the 1930s, without natural anchors to keep the soil in place, it dried, turned to dust, and blew away with the prevailing winds. At times, the clouds blackened the sky, reaching all the way to East Coast cities such as New York and Washington, D.C. Much of the soil ended up deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, carried by prevailing winds. These immense dust storms—given names such as "black blizzards" and "black rollers"—often reduced visibility to a few feet (a meter) or less. The Dust Bowl affected 100,000,000 acres (400,000 km2), centered on the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, and adjacent parts of New Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas.[2]

Millions of acres of farmland were damaged, and hundreds of thousands of people were forced to leave their homes; many of these families (often known as "Okies", since so many came from Oklahoma) migrated to California and other states, where they found economic conditions little better during the Great Depression than those they had left. Owning no land, many became migrant workers who traveled from farm to farm to pick fruit and other crops at starvation wages. Author John Steinbeck later wrote The Grapes of Wrath, which won the Pulitzer Prize, and Of Mice and Men, about such people.

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Nissa Herrera's comment, February 25, 2013 8:34 AM
Topic 1