Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university
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Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university
Challenges and solutions for universities and business schools towards more research influence, academic impact and societal/managerial relevance
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From the boardroom to the business school classroom. So, you want to be a business professor?

From the boardroom to the business school classroom. So, you want to be a business professor? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

Career transitions within the same industry are challenging enough, but transitions across sectors are even more difficult. Underlying cultural and operational differences between industry and academia present significant hidden obstacles for practitioners seeking to become teachers in higher education. To help expose these challenges, I recount—in this Executive Digest—my personal experiences leaving the consulting profession for a role as a faculty member at the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University. I offer comparisons between the two career models, illustrate specific examples of misaligned expectations, and conclude with practical suggestions to ease the transition and set forth a solid foundation for longevity in academia for non-researchers.

 

The author: "For those seeking an opportunity to leave industry and begin a career in academia, there are a number of differences between the perceptions and realities of being a non-tenure track faculty member that may further compound the problem. These perceptions often lead to a period of inflated expectations that overemphasize the more glamorous aspects of teaching, such as being acknowledged for your accomplishments, recognized for your content expertise, and thanked a million times over in the receiving lines at annual graduation processions. When the role is fully revealed, however, many faculty members feel duped and even disil- lusioned by the realities of their new role. Whether it is the lack of career progression or the unexpected amount of work that goes into designing, developing, and delivering curriculum, there are a number of unanticipated challenges that may cause some to regret their decision."

 

Source:

Business Horizons

Available online 10 May 2013

In Press, Executive Digest

 So, you want to be a business professor?John E. Wisneski Kelley School of Business, Indiana University, 1309 E. Tenth Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-1701, U.S.A.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bushor.2013.04.007,
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Relevance or ‘relevate’? How university business schools can add value through reflexively learning from strategic partnerships with business

Relevance or ‘relevate’? How university business schools can add value through reflexively learning from strategic partnerships with business | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

Much has been debated about the perceived relevance/irrelevance of business schools in addressing business needs with some suggesting that academic research is not applicable to practice. We contribute by claiming the debate is itself somewhat misplaced and the real task of business schools is to instil the art of ‘relevating’ the seemingly irrelevant in order to prepare managers for the challenges they face. Paradoxically, we contend that in relentlessly pursuing scholarship, academics can make a valuable contribution to practice by offering counterintuitive viewpoints that challenge business mindsets. Ironically, value-adding contributions to practice are best made when academia resists the seductive tendency to capitulate to the immediate demands of the client. For it is only by challenging conventional wisdom and expectations and thereby creating dissonance in the minds of managers, that new and unthought avenues of action may be opened up for consideration. We illustrate this by examining the experiences of a partnership between a multinational corporation and a university in the United Kingdom where the executive education programme was carried out using action learning techniques while encouraging reflexivity in practice.

 

The authors: "Scholarship and academic rigour on the part of university business schools can serve to challenge the cultural inertia of corporations by disrupting dominant logics (Prahalad, 2004) and established norms of practice in order to expand horizons of comprehension and pave the way for new avenues of venture for a corporation. This is the true competitive advantage of university business schools."

 

 

Source:

Relevance or ‘relevate’? How university business schools can add value through reflexively learning from strategic partnerships with businesssteve paton steve.paton@strath.ac.uk, University of Strathclyde, UKRobert Chia, University of Glasgow, UKGeorge Burt, University of Strathclyde, UK

doi: 10.1177/1350507613479541

Management Learning March 21, 2013 1350507613479541

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Convergence and Divergence Dynamics in British & French Business Schools: top schools need a more heterogeneous approach to outperform the competitors

Convergence and Divergence Dynamics in British & French Business Schools: top schools need a more heterogeneous approach to outperform the competitors | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

This paper focuses on convergence and divergence dynamics among leading British and French business schools and explores how the pressure for accreditation influences these dynamics. We illustrate that despite historical differences in approaches to management education in Britain and France, these approaches have converged partly based on the influence of the American model of management education but more recently through the pursuit of accreditation, in particular from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business and the European Quality Improvement Standard. We explore these dynamics through the application of the resource-based view of the firm and institutional theory and suggest that, whilst achieving accreditation is a necessary precursor for international competition, it is no longer a form of competitive advantage. The pursuit of accreditation has fostered a form of competitive mimicry reducing national distinctiveness. The resource-based view of the firm suggests that the top schools need a more heterogeneous approach that is not easily replicable if they are to outperform the competitors. Consequently, the convergence of management education in Britain and France will become a new impetus for divergence. We assert that future growth and competitive advantage might be better achieved through the reassertion of national, regional and local cultural characteristics.

 

The authors: "Without jeopardizing their accreditation, we would expect B-schools to pursue individual and separation strategies to differentiate themselves from others. There are already signs of this happening. The proximity of City University to the financial district of London is reflected in a suite of courses in their B-school (Cass Business School) that prepare students for specialized financial careers. BEM Management School in Bordeaux can demonstrate excellence in wine related businesses. In such examples we see the emergence of B-schools that reflect their particular
location, history and culture. But they do this upon high quality foundations. Ironically, therefore, homogenization will help B-schools find their own distinctive identities."

 

source:

Convergence and Divergence Dynamics in British and French Business Schools: How Will the Pressure for Accreditation Influence these Dynamics?Lisa Thomas,Jon Billsberry,Véronique Ambrosini,Harry Barton

British Journal of Management, 2013

DOI: 10.1111/1467-8551.12007

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Why do scholars cite the New York Times so much? The New York Times as a resource for Mode 2 knowledge

Why do scholars cite the New York Times so much? The New York Times as a resource for Mode 2 knowledge | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

The New York Times receives more citations from academic journals than the American Sociological Review, Research Policy, or the Harvard Law Review. This paper explores the reasons why scholars cite the New York Times so much. Reasons include studying the newspaper itself or New York City, establishing public interest in a topic by referencing press coverage, introducing specificity, and treating the New York Times very much like an academic journal. The phenomenon seems to reflect a Mode 2 type of scholarship produced in the context of application, organizationally diverse, socially accountable and aiming to be socially useful as well as high quality as assessed by peers.

 

The authors: " In this study we investigate the relationship between the scholarly literature and the New York Times as expressed through references in journal articles. We find that NYT referencing is extensive and that growth in NYT referencing has accelerated in recent years, probably due to easier access to NYT articles over the internet. Referencing is widespread, though most intensive in law, international relations and political science. Nevertheless, academics have not become journalists and journalists have not become academics. Examining the contexts of NYT references, we find authors most often leveraging the differences between the scholarly and newspaper genres to advance their arguments. Sometimes the NYT is referenced because the NYT is the subject of the research. Sometimes New York City is the subject, which leads to extensive use of the NYT as a source. More often, authors seek to establish the importance of their topic by using press coverage as evidence of public concern. The New York Times is also used as a primary source, for example in discussing a recent event or inserting words spoken by an influential person. Perhaps half of NYT referencing uses the NYT as a
primary source. Authors who use the NYT for evidence of public concern and to support their turn to specificity are leveraging differences between scholarship and journalism as genres of social knowledge making. In contrast co-citing with journal articles or citing academics writing in the NYT are patterns that seem to violate long standing concerns with demarcation among scholars. These patterns can be understood within a
framework that recognizes that social scientists and humanists work in more than one genre, one of which is enlightenment literature. That the New York Times reigns supreme in the enlightenment literature testifies to the success of 100 years of strategic development that explicitly targeted academia at key points. The New York Times and academia, though distinct, have become symbiotic enterprises within the ecology of public
knowledge."

 

Source:

Diana Hicks and Jian Wang. 2013. "The New York Times as a resource for Mode 2" The Selected Works of Diana Hicks
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/diana_hicks/34

 

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Communities of Impact; can communities of practice theory enhance the understanding of research impact; on TradMetrics, AltMetrics and tracking the signatures of these social interactions

Communities of Impact; can communities of practice theory enhance the understanding of research impact; on TradMetrics, AltMetrics and tracking the signatures of these social interactions | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

AbstractCommunities of Practice (CoP) are groups that “share a concern or a passion for something” and “learn how to do it better as they interact regularly” (Wenger 2006). CoP studies reason that learning is an on-going social endeavour based upon the connections between people. One could consider a faculty, institution or an entire field, as a CoP. Scholarly publishing traditions, such as peer-review and citing prior work help ensure rigor and add value to scholarly literature in a way that is not seen to the same extent elsewhere in publishing. Impact is a frequently used term in research circles. Extrapolated impact predictions are a key factor in determining what research is funded, whereas retrospectively calculated impact metrics are a often used to measure the success of a particular researcher, or a research project. Unfortunately the term impact lacks clear definition. Furthermore impact metrics are often interpreted without a full understand of what is being interpreted. Through reviewing relevant literature, this paper positions itself to question whether the value of CoP should be represented in impact metrics, and whether the shortcomings of existing impact metrics can be mitigated by assessing impact in terms of CoP.

 

 

The authors:" The corpus of literature that discusses altmetrics gives a
compelling account of why an alternative view of metrics is necessary based on problems (with tradmetrics) and opportunities (the potential to exploit newly available data). Scholars have demonstrated how altmetrics work in practice. Altmetrics are inherently based upon socially relevant data, and indeed data that is usually generated through social interactions, but thus far implementations of altmetric compasses have failed to account for the value of stimulating or nurturing those interactions. Altmetrics
demonstrate that social interactions can be used as a measure of impact or influence, stemming from a particular piece of research. It does this through tracking the signatures of these social interactions. Whereas tradmetrics are structurally impotent in this regard, altmetrics fall short in terms of CoP in that they simply don't attempt to account for the tacit value of the social interactions that they are measuring the signature of.

 

Source:

Communities of Impact
Joseph Lindley, HighWire DTC, Lancaster University, United Kingdom
j.lindley@lancaster.ac.uk
April 2013
The master copy of this document can be annotated at http://communitiesofimpact.joesart.org/

 

 

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Are alternative metrics still alternative?

Are alternative metrics still alternative? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

Editor's Summary

Since the 1960s citation counts have been the standard for judging scholarly contributions and status, but growing awareness of the strategy's limitations should lead to acceptance of alternative metrics. Citation analysis drawbacks include lack of timeliness, self citation and citations that are superfluous, negative and incomplete, and traditional counts reflect only a small fraction of actual usage. A better categorization of scholarly impact would cover usage, captures, mentions and social media in addition to citations. Metrics should include mentions in blogs and other nontraditional formats, open review forums, electronic book downloads, library circulation counts, bookmarks, tweets and more. Such alternative metrics provide a more complete view of peer response to scholarly writings and better demonstrate the relative position of a research grant applicant and potential for influential work. Altmetrics are readily available, and their value for evaluating scholarly work should be recognized.

 

The authors:" There is a temptation to see this new paradigm for measuring impact as a passing fad: interesting, but too early, or simply not serious with regard to scientific research. The question arises: Does the process for granting tenure need to be changed in order for these measures to be accepted? A better question is why a demonstrably sub-standard process whose faults and drawbacks are so well known has persisted for so long. The easy answer is that it is all we have had for five decades, but the truth is that decisionmakers want quantifiable data for making decisions. Promotion, hiring and grant funding processes will continue to evolve, but those changes will not be prerequisites for including more holistic measurements."

 

source:

Special Section: What, Why And Where?

You have full text access to this contentAre alternative metrics still alternative?Mike Buschman Co-Founders of Plum Analytics, Worked at Microsoft as a Librarian and Program Manager1,Andrea Michalek Co-Founders of Plum Analytics, Serial Entrepreneur with a Focus on Search and Information Retrieval Products2

DOI: 10.1002/bult.2013.1720390411

Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

Volume 39, Issue 4, pages 35–39, April/May 2013

 

 

 

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Nascent Academic Entrepreneurs Face Unique Challenges, Conflicts in Taking Innovations from University Lab to Market

Nascent Academic Entrepreneurs Face Unique Challenges, Conflicts in Taking Innovations from University Lab to Market | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

New technology innovations – and the startup companies formed to commercialize them – increasingly have their beginnings in university research labs.

And it's more likely that PhD students, not faculty, form the initial idea for a new technology. While in later stages these ventures resemble typical technology startups, they experience a different early development process, decision points and potential conflicts that can make or break an innovation's chances of making it to market.

"From Lab Bench to Innovation: Critical Challenges to Nascent Academic Entrepreneurs," a new study released by the Kauffman Foundation, examines the particular experience of nascent academic entrepreneurs (NAEs) and the implications of this experience for universities and policymakers. The study is among the few to focus specifically on this important group of entrepreneurs at the individual, rather than institutional, level.

"This research supports the notion that graduate students have an important role in commercializing their inventions from the university lab and they need support models to help them advance to the commercial marketplace. This is significant because many universities in the U.S. do not clearly define intellectual property rights in support of student entrepreneurs. I'm hoping this paper will encourage universities to consider more open policies," said Lesa Mitchell, vice president of Innovation and Networks at the Kauffman Foundation. "The paper also reinforces the value of competitions that allow students access to robust resources and experiences that can help them move their science inventions from lab to market." 

 

Author Roman M. Lubynsky, senior venture advisor, MIT Venture Mentoring Service, followed and analyzed the experiences of 10 NAEs involved in eight ventures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, all of whom were enrolled in the university's Venture Mentoring Service.

 

The cases spanned the product life cycle from idea to commercialization across a range of technologies and industries, with data collected through interviews, observation and archival data.

 

Lubynsky defines an NAE as a faculty, staff or student researcher at a university who has left the university, or intends to leave, to devote full-time attention to the development of a company based on research that originated at the university in which he or she was involved, and which has not yet achieved real economic activity through sales of the product or services.

Key study findings include:

Many academic entrepreneurs are students at the time they formed their initial idea and began exploring the possibility of a startup venture.NAEs typically found academic ventures as "research-based startups" with the goal of completing or developing the new technology to make it ready for commercialization, and spend years – sometimes as much as a decade – in this phase. Their objectives, required resources, structure and funding sources differ at each stage.The decision to launch a venture evolves as the NAE gains confidence in his or her entrepreneurial abilities and determines that the technology likely cannot be licensed unless they bring it to maturity first.Finally, academic entrepreneurs are more likely than typical technology entrepreneurs to experience serious conflicts – particularly with their faculty advisors – over intellectual property and equity participation.

Fulltext:

http://www.kauffman.org/uploadedFiles/DownLoadableResources/from-lab-bench-to-innovation.pdf

 

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The Worth of the University; on the critical role that universities play in educating students and promoting the overall well-being of our society.

The Worth of the University; on the critical role that universities play in educating students and promoting the overall well-being of our society. | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Published on the occasion of Richard C. Levin’s retirement as president of Yale University, this captivating collection of speeches and essays from the past decade reflects both his varied intellectual passions and his deep commitment to university life and leadership. Whether discussing the economic implications of climate change or speaking to an incoming class of Yale freshmen, he argues for the vital importance of scholarship and the critical role that universities play in educating students and promoting the overall well-being of our society.

This collection is a sequel to The Work of the University, which contained the principal writings from Levin’s first decade as Yale’s president, and it enunciates many of the same enduring themes: forging a strong partnership with the city of New Haven, rebuilding Yale’s physical infrastructure, strengthening science and engineering, and internationalizing the university. But this companion volume also captures the essence of university leadership. In addressing topics as varied as his personal sources of inspiration, the development of Asian universities, and the university’s role in promoting innovation and economic growth, Levin challenges the reader to be more engaged, more creative, more innovative, and above all, a better global citizen. Throughout, his commitment to and affection for Yale shines through.

 

Richard C. Levin, the Frederick William Beinecke Professor of Economics, is the twenty-second president of Yale University. Before becoming president in 1993, he taught economics at Yale for two decades, chaired the economics department, and served as dean of the Graduate School. Levin serves on President Obama’s Council of Advisors for Science and Technology. He is a director of the Hewlett Foundation, ClimateWorks, and American Express. He served on a bipartisan commission to recommend improvements in the nation’s intelligence capabilities, and he co-chaired a major review of the nation’s patent system for the National Academy of Sciences. He holds honorary degrees from Harvard, Princeton, Oxford, Peking, Tokyo, and Waseda universities, as well as the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

Source:

The Worth of the University Richard C. Levin

 2013 
296 p., 5 1/2 x 8 1/4 
5 color illus.
ISBN: 9780300197259
Cloth: $28.00 sc

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The Tyranny of Relevance and the Art of Translation; towards pathways of impact

The Tyranny of Relevance and the Art of Translation; towards pathways of impact | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

The ‘tyranny of relevance’ captures a widespread sense of concern among social and political scientists that their academic freedom and professional autonomy is under threat from a changing social context in which scholars are increasingly expected to demonstrate some form of social ‘relevance’, ‘impact’ or ‘engagement’ beyond academe. This article attempts to reframe the current debate by reflecting upon the history of the discipline and different forms of scholarship in order to craft an argument concerning the need for political scientists to rediscover ‘the art of translation’. This, in turn, facilitates a more sophisticated grasp of key concepts, emphasises the need for the discipline to engage with multiple publics in multiple ways, and suggests that engaging with non-academic audiences is likely to improve not simply the discipline's leverage in terms of funding, or scholarship in terms of quality, but also teaching in terms of energy and relevance. The simple argument of this article is not therefore that political science has become irrelevant, but that it has generally failed to promote and communicate the social value and benefit of the discipline in an accessible manner. Resolving this situation is likely to demand a little political imagination.


The author:"

The argument is not that academics should become public intellectuals, but rather more akin to specific or critical intellectuals in the sense of bringing new perspectives, expertise or insights to bear on contemporary debates. The notion of critical intellectuals injects a very clear normative or political dimension which grates against the view of many critics that the current emphasis on relevance represents little more than the (tyrannical) imposition of a shallow market-based and instrumental logic that should be resisted – resisted on the basis that the need to be viewed as ‘engaged’, ‘relevant’ or having some form of demonstrable ‘impact’ risks sterilising the study of politics and silencing critical voices.A different ‘road to relevance’ might interpret the changing context not as a threat but as an opportunity to showcase exactly why the study of politics matters, to forge a deeper and more reflective model of scholarship, to redefine the boundaries of the discipline and to increase the leverage position of the discipline vis-à-vis external research funders."

 

Source:

The Tyranny of Relevance and the Art of TranslationMatthew Flinders

Article first published online: 16 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1111/1478-9302.12011

Political Studies Review

Volume 11, Issue 2, pages 149–167, May 2013

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Rachel H's curator insight, May 3, 2013 10:41 AM

Bit intellectual for me, but makes good points

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Some Current Issues in Business Education.. a view of the classic issue of relevance dating back to 1958...any news?

The article reports on business education. The author discusses a research study focused on business education offered at universities and colleges throughout the United States. Obstacles facing the presenters of business education, including diversity within the discipline, are discussed in detail. Business professors must keep in mind that businessmen may serve many different functions and work within many different industries. Therefore the education they receive must be applicable within many different industries and many different positions. The author offers recommendations for changes to be made in both graduate and undergraduate business curriculums.

 

The author: " Knowledge, to be useful, must be applied, and the most fundamental skill required in business is the ability to apply what has been
learned either from formal education or from experience. This suggests the need for "clinical" teaching; the students must not be permitted to be passive in the educational process. So far, the case method of teaching has been the business schools' chief answer to this problem, but this is not the whole answer...education for business is a lifetime process which involves not only formal education before a business career begins but also the learning that comes through experience and the formal training that can go on concurrently with work experience. An impressive body of evidence suggests approximately where the dividing line should be drawn between work experience and the employer, on the one hand, and the colleges on the other."

 

Citation by the author: "Wise is the businessman who seeks the company of scholars. Wise also is the scholar who seeks the company of businessmen, and farsighted the institution of higher learning which invites them to visit its academic halls. These two groups, the professors and the men from industry, have more in common than they know, and each has a great contribution to make to the other. Together they bear important responsibility for the preservation of the American way of life."
Clarence B. Randall,
"A Businessman Looks at tlie Liberal Arts."

 

Source:

Some Current Issues in Business Education, Gordon, R.A. California Management Review; Fall1958, Vol. 1 Issue 1, p56-67, 12p

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What makes business school research impactful? Academic visibility, Prominence, perceived quality or collaboration?

What makes business school research impactful? Academic visibility, Prominence, perceived quality or collaboration? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT 

What makes business school research impactful? What determine the number of citation a business school received? The relative proportion of articles published by North American business school is declining (less than 50% in 2010) while the number of citations received by north American business schools better resists (70% of market share in 2010). This paper explores the determinants of academic impact measured by citations at the business school level and the evolution over the last 20 years. It analyzes the respective influence of different effects on the total number of citations: media ranking, number of publication, number of publication in top journals, collaboration with prominent actors (top 100 MBAs), the number of article produced and national/international collaborations. 

The paper assesses impact by counting systematically citations at the organization level. The results show that media ranking influence more the visibility of academic work and scholarship than the number of paper published or the quality of journals. Such results question the functioning of academia in Management and shed light on the interrelationship between status and reputation in academia. 

 

The authors:"To cope with the growing number of publications and high work pressure, scholars are selecting what they read not only according to the status of journals but rather according the reputation of the institution the scholars come from. The triggers of visibility are becoming circular. Scholars are reading and citing other scholars from high reputation institutions to attest that they also belong to the network of reputable scholars. It increases the reputation of those scholars and of their institution, leading to higher levels of citations."

 

Source:

 

ACADEMIC VISIBILITY: PROMINENCE, PERCEIVED QUALITY OR COLLABORATION? 

Charles Baden Fuller*, Mustapha Belkhouja**, Vincent Mangemati 


Fulltext: http://mosaic.hec.ca/documents/file/CBFMBVM2013%20-%20Academic%20visibility.pdf


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MelissaRossman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 10:32 AM

excellent

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:32 AM
excellent
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The pursuit of academic excellence and business engagement: is it irreconcilable?

The pursuit of academic excellence and business engagement: is it irreconcilable? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

Universities currently need to satisfy the demands of different audiences. In light of the increasing policy emphasis on “third mission” activities, universities are attempting to incorporate these into their traditional missions of teaching and research. University strategies to accomplishing its traditional missions are well-honed and routinized, but the incorporation of the third mission is posing important strategic and managerial challenges for universities. This study explores the relationship between university–business collaborations and academic excellence in order to examine the extent to which academic institutions can balance these objectives. Based on data from the UK Research Assessment Exercise 2001 at the level of the university department, we find no systematic positive or negative relationship between scientific excellence and engagement with industry. Across the disciplinary fields reported in the 2001 Research Assessment Exercise (i.e. engineering, hard sciences, biomedicine, social sciences and the humanities) the relationship between academic excellence and engagement with business is largely contingent on the institutional context of the university department. This paper adds to the growing body of literature on university engagement with business by examining this activity for the social sciences and the humanities. Our findings have important implications for the strategic management of university departments and for higher education policy related to measuring the performance of higher education research institutions.

 

The authors:"the results of these studies suggest that university departments that try to pursue scientific excellence and business engagement need to make deliberate efforts to formulate a strategy that attenuates the potential conflicts between them. The laissez faire
strategy of focusing on one particular research objective and expecting (or hoping) that the other will automatically follow may not be effective, the two missions may be difficult to reconcile."

 

Source:

ScientometricsMay 2013, Volume 95, Issue 2, pp 481-502The pursuit of academic excellence and business engagement: is it irreconcilable?Pablo D’Este,Puay Tang,Surya Mahdi,Andy Neely,Mabel Sánchez-Barrioluengo
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Research Data Metrics for datasets; the first landscape study on the assessment of use and impact of datasharing in scientific work from a cultural and technical point of view

Research Data Metrics for datasets; the first landscape study on the assessment of use and impact of datasharing in scientific work from a cultural and technical point of view | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Knowledge Exchange presents landscape report on where metrics can play a role in making research data available. The report ’The Value of Research Data – Metrics for datasets from a cultural and technical point of view’ recommends that data sharing and data publication should be more broadly adopted among scholars. To support this a reward system should be developed for scientists that includes data metrics. Other important steps to be taken are that the costs of data publication should be reduced and the existing negative perceptions of researchers regarding data publication should be addressed. Standards will need to be developed for preservation, publication, identification and citation of datasets. The report was commissioned by Knowledge Exchange and written by Rodrigo Costas, Ingeborg Meijer and Paul Wouters from the Centre for Science and Technology Studies at the Unversity of Leiden. Data sharing offers important benefits for scientific progress and advancement of knowledge. However, several limitations and barriers in the general adoption of data sharing are still in place. Probably the most important challenge is that data sharing is not yet very common among scholars and is not yet seen as a regular activity among scientists, although important efforts are being invested in promoting data sharing. This report explores the possibilities of metrics for datasets and an effective reward system that connects with the interests of the stakeholders involved in the process. The report reviews the current literature on data sharing and data metrics and presents outcomes of interviews with the main stakeholders on data sharing and data metrics. Existing repositories and tools in the field of data sharing have been analysed that have special relevance for the promotion and development of data metrics. Máire Geoghegan-Quinn, the European Commissioner of Research, Innovation and Science commented on this report: "The European Commission is committed to increase the impact of publicly-funded research through open access. We have already said this will be the default for publications arising from future EU funded research in Horizon 2020, and we are considering also a pilot project to explore ways to make research data open access too. We welcome all contributions to this debate and this report is very timely as we develop our ideas.” This report presents a first landscape study of creating and promoting data metrics. It also assesses the use of datasets in scientific work as a tool to stimulate data sharing. This report will be of interest not only for major stakeholders in science, but also for research funders and scientific institutions. It provides them with more knowledge about tools to promote and reward data sharing and data publication within their scientific communities. In this landscape study, all major stakeholders have been considered in order to summarize the main views, problems and challenges that need to be tackled in the development of metrics for datasets, and in the generalisation and promotion of data sharing activities. 

 

Source:The Value of Research DataMetrics for datasets from a cultural and technical point of viewRodrigo Costas, Ingeborg Meijer, Zohreh Zahedi and Paul Wouters
Center for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS). Leiden University. 2013 

 

Fulltext is here: http://www.knowledge-exchange.info/Admin/Public/DWSDownload.aspx?File=%2fFiles%2fFiler%2fdownloads%2fPrimary+Research+Data%2fMetrics+paper%2fValue_of_Research_Data.pdf 

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Analyzing the citation characteristics of books: edited books, book series and types of publishers in the Book Citation Index

Analyzing the citation characteristics of books: edited books, book series and types of publishers in the Book Citation Index | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

This paper presents a first approach to analyzing the factors that determine the citation characteristics of books. For this we use the Thomson Reuters' Book Citation Index, a novel multidisciplinary database launched in 2010 which offers bibliometric data of books. We analyze three possible factors which are considered to affect the citation impact of books: the presence of editors, the inclusion in series and the type of publisher. Also, we focus on highly cited books to see if these factors may affect them as well. We considered as highly cited books, those in the top 5% of the most highly cited ones of the database. We define these three aspects and we present the results for four major scientific areas in order to identify field-based differences (Science, Engineering & Technology, Social Sciences and Arts & Humanities). Finally we conclude observing that differences were noted for edited books and types of publishers. Although books included in series showed higher impact in two areas.


The authors: "there is a common phenomenon which occurs across all areas: books published by university presses have a significantly higher impact than the rest.At this point we must take this statement with caution, as after supervising these publishers, we find out that these university presses included in the BKCI are considered of huge prestige such as Cambridge UP, Princeton UP and University of California P. That is, the high impact books published in university presses have may rely on a better selection of books and topics on which to publish than that followed by commercial publishers such as Elsevier, Routledge or Palgrave, for instance."


Source:

Analyzing the citation characteristics of books: edited books, book series and types of publishers in the Book Citation IndexDaniel Torres-Salinas, Nicolás Robinson-García, Álvaro Cabezas-Clavijo, Evaristo Jiménez-Contreras



Computer Science > Digital Libraries; 2013arXiv:1305.1483


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The great divide between business schools research and business practice; would 'industrial sabbaticals' be a new solution?

The great divide between business schools research and business practice; would 'industrial sabbaticals' be a new solution? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

In their 2005 Harvard Business Review article, Bennis and O’Toole described business schools as being “on the wrong track” as a result of their focus on so-called scientific research. Some commentators argue that business schools have slowly lost their relevance since the end of the 1950s when they undertook a major overhaul in response to the harsh criticism of the Ford and the Carnegie Foundations on the state of theory and research in business administration. Inspired by Khurana’s (2007) book on the development of American business schools, this article describes the debate on the relevance of scientific business research that can be found in the popular business press and the academic literature, and suggests a number of structural and cultural changes to increase the relevance of business research and its impact on practice.


The authors: "Just as the teaching assignment of medical professors is adjusted to allow them to practise medicine, business professors could divide their time between teaching and practice, and should be encouraged to use sabbaticals as opportunities to assume roles in businesses. Although this solution could appear unworkable because of the lack of experience many PhD professors have in the “real world” of management and business, we believe that industrial sabbaticals could provide academics with an opportunity to improve their knowledge about business practice and for practitioners to reflect on the way they conduct their affairs."


Source:

 

The great divide between business schools research and business practiceIsabelle Dostaler, Thomas J. Tomberlin

Canadian Journal of Higher Education Revue canadienne d’enseignement supérieur Volume 43, No. 1, 2013, pages 115-128 

 

Fulltext: http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/cjhe/article/view/1895/184000

 


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The University as an Entrepreneur: The Ingredients for Valorization and Valorization Strategies

The University as an Entrepreneur: The Ingredients for Valorization and Valorization Strategies | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

Valorization of research results is becoming increasingly important today. Since academic research should not only contribute to our “quest for fundamental understanding,” but it also needs to “consider use” (Stokes, 1997); these dual goals give rise to tension in academic institutes that need to carefully balance research and its exploitation. Nevertheless, valorization, commercialization, technology transfer, knowledge exploitation or exploitation of research are different labels for a similar activity and have become part and parcel of academic life. Most universities own the intellectual property rights of their research, meaning they have the legal rights (in some countries the legal obligation) to exploit it in a way they see fit. Research shows that universities have different objectives (e.g. regional development, spin-off creation) for engaging in this process and every university has developed its own approach to deal with this in the sense of funding and support. On an abstract level, there are two scenarios for commercialization. In the first scenario the university takes the role of “entrepreneur” and in the second scenario it is the researcher (or the research group) who is involved in research that takes this role with the university being the context in which entrepreneurship takes place. In this contribution our focus is on the university as entrepreneur and we regard valorization as an entrepreneurial process. In order to visualize how the activities of different actors associated with the university contribute to the entrepreneurial process of a university, we will build on ideas postulated by Wakkee and Van der Sijde (2010) regarding the fluid and moldable nature of opportunities. We conceptually elaborate the consequences of their approach for bringing knowledge (and technology) from university to the market.

 

The authors:" In this paper we have considered the university as the entrepreneur rather than as a context in which entrepreneurship takes place. This does not mean, however, that individual members cannot be simultaneously involved this entrepreneurial processes. If managed intelligently by the university, a considerable part of the entrepreneurial activities of staff members may fall under the ‘‘umbrella’’ created by the university’s opportunity scenario, although there will always be individual
researchers who are (at least temporarily) involved in various commercializing activities that fall outside this opportunity scenario."

 

Source:

Peter van der Sijde, Ingrid Wakkee, Eveline Stam, Mirjam Leloux (2013), The University as an Entrepreneur: The Ingredients for Valorization and Valorization Strategies, in Ray Oakey, Aard Groen, Gary Cook, Peter Van Der Sijde (ed.) New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium (New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millenium, Volume 10), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.213-224

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A Simple Journal Ranking Tactic to Address Coercive Citation and Discipline-Specific Citation Density in Academic Business Journals; should a journal in a discipline be judged relative to the prowe...

A Simple Journal Ranking Tactic to Address Coercive Citation and Discipline-Specific Citation Density in Academic Business Journals; should a journal in a discipline be judged relative to the prowe... | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:     
This paper describes a flexible way to unify the many disparate citation-based journal ranking metrics commonly used to assess the relative merit of academic business journals. The guiding principle for the proposed approach is the simple and intuitively appealing idea that a journal in a given discipline should be judged relative to the prowess of the top journal(s) in its discipline. This ratio approach functions as a hybrid of the stated preference and revealed preference journal ranking ideologies, and accordingly offers several far reaching advantages, among them the ability to map all citation-based journal metrics to the zero-one interval, hence normalizing inter-metric and cross-disciplinary journal comparisons. The ratio approach also accounts for citation density across business fields and mitigates the effects of coercive citation, which can undermine cross-discipline journal comparisons if left unchecked.


The author: "The simple logic of the ratio approach embodied in the paper’s core proposition is that a researcher’s output should be judged relative to the best journals in his or her discipline. Operationalizing this logic permits all citation-based journals metrics to be mapped to the zero-one interval, which normalizes inter-metric and cross-discipline comparisons, and reduces the concern that coercive citation will give one discipline’s research output an advantage over another. The subjective selection of the denominating journal(s) means the ratio approach is a de facto hybrid of the stated and revealed preference journal ranking ideologies. As such, the ratio approach aligns the strengths of each to form a unified approach to the practice of journal ranking."


Source:

Haley, M. Ryan, A Simple Journal Ranking Tactic to Address Coercive Citation and Discipline-Specific Citation Density in Academic Business Journals (February 4, 2013). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2211804 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2211804


 

 

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The power of altmetrics on a scholar’s CV; 10 benefits to scholars and scholarship when altmetrics are embedded in the CV

The power of altmetrics on a scholar’s CV; 10 benefits to scholars and scholarship when altmetrics are embedded in the CV | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract

Alternative metrics demonstrate the value and influence of scholars' work apart from traditional citation counts and can enhance the impact of a CV. Altmetrics provide additional, supplementary information and can balance misleading metrics tied to particular journals. More timely than traditional metrics, altmetrics quickly reveal the impact of recent work and add authority to different types of scholarly products not captured as articles. Altmetrics can capture social media references that escape traditional metrics and reflect public engagement prompted by scholarly writing. The availability of altmetrics expands publishing opportunities to include new venues and stimulates innovative strategies for evaluating research. When included in a CV altmetrics must be accurate, clear and meaningful.

 

Source:

The power of altmetrics on a CVHeather Piwowar Postdoc1,Jason Priem PhD Student and Royster Fellow, Studying Information Science2

DOI: 10.1002/bult.2013.1720390405

Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

Volume 39, Issue 4, pages 10–13, April/May 2013

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How good is research really? Measuring the citation impact of publications with percentiles increases correct assessments and fair comparisons

How good is research really? Measuring the citation impact of publications with percentiles increases correct assessments and fair comparisons | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

The goal of bibliometric research itself is the development and testing of new performance indicators for research evaluation. For example, to address specific disadvantages of the original h index, nearly 40 variants of the h index have been proposed, most of which are redundant in terms of their application. We need new citation impact indicators that normalize for any factors other than quality that influence citation rates and that take into account the skewed distributions of citations across papers. The percentile indicators described in this paper might provide a solution.


The authors:" In addition to analysing the distribution of percentiles, it is possible to focus on percentile rank classes. Bornmann proposes—also as an alternative to the hindex —the Ptop 10% or PPtop 10% indicators, which can be considered to belong to the group of ‘success indicators’ in bibliometrics, to evaluate an institute. These indicators count the number of successful publications by a research unit, taking into account normalization over age and field. Ptop 10% is the number and PPtop 10% is the proportion of publications that belong to the top 10% most frequently cited publications. A publication belongs to this group if it is cited more often than 90% of publications published in the same field and in the same year."


"Ptop 10% and PPtop 10% have the additional benefit that they do not use an arbitrary threshold to determine the successful publications in a set, which is a disadvantage of the h index."


"PPtop 10% offers a third advantage over the h index in terms of allowing direct comparisons between publication sets. Statistically, it could be expected that 10% of publications from a random sample (drawn from InCites) would belong to the top 10% of the most-cited publications in a given subject category and publication year. The expected PPtop 10% would therefore be 10%."


 

Source:

science & societyEMBO reports (2013) 14, 226 - 230 doi:10.1038/embor.2013.9How good is research really?

Measuring the citation impact of publications with percentiles increases correct assessments and fair comparisons

Lutz Bornmann & Werner Marx

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Research collaboration in health management research communities is growing but the Cooperation intensity is still relatively weak

Research collaboration in health management research communities is growing but the Cooperation intensity is still relatively weak | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
AbstractBackground

This study uses scientometrics methodology to reveal the status quo and emerging issues of collaboration in health management.

Methods

We searched all the articles with the keyword "health management" in the period 1999--2011 in Web of Knowledge, then 3067 articles were found. Methods such as Social network analysis (SNA), co-authorship, co-word analysis were used in this study.

Results

Analysis of the past 13 years of research in the field of health management indicates that, whether the production of scientific research, or authors, institutions and scientific research collaboration at the national level, collaboration behavior has been growing steadily across all collaboration types. However, the international scientific research cooperation about health management study between countries needs to be further encouraged. 17 researchers can be seen as the academic leaders in this field. 37 research institutions play a vital role in the information dissemination and resources control in health management. The component analysis found that 22 research groups can be regarded as the backbone in this field. The 8 institution groups consisting of 33 institutions form the core of this field. USA, UK and Australia lie in the center by cohesive subgroup analysis; Based on keywords analysis, 44 keywords with high frequency such as care, disease, system and model were involved in the health management field.

Conclusions

This study demonstrates that although it is growing steadily, collaboration behavior about health management study needs to be enhanced, especially between different institutions or countries/regions, which would promote the progress and internationalization of health management. Besides, researchers should pay attention to the cooperation of representative scholars and institutions, as well as the hot areas of research, because their experience would help us promote the research development of our nation.

 

The authors:"

The number of publications in the health management field is showing a rising trend,especially in recent years. Co-authorship is also keeping growing. And the cooperation of authors is obviously higher than that by institutions and countries. 22 research groups and 37 institutions devoted in this field, among which researchers or research team of USA and UK

are in the core position in the collaboration network. Reviewing the related articles in other fields and comparing them with the research results in oncology or cardiovascular field in earlier stage, though 81% of the articles are produced by scientific cooperation, the Cooperation intensity in the field of health management is still relatively weak, especially between institutions and countries. Therefore, the important way of promoting the progress and internationalization of health management is to strengthen the cooperation between countries and institutions and take full advantage of the core role of dominant groups"

 

 

Source:

Research collaboration in health management research communities

Chichen Zhang, Qi Yu, Qinghua Fan and Zhiguang Duan

BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2013, 13:52 doi:10.1186/1472-6947-13-52

Published: 23 April 2013

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Practicing what We Preach; do the levels of geographic diversification in editorial board membership of management journals reflect the diversity in the management community

Practicing what We Preach; do the levels of geographic diversification in editorial board membership of management journals reflect the diversity in the management community | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

 

With the increasing globalisation of knowledge and management education, it is important that we build on our scanty understanding of trends and levels of geographic diversification in editorial board membership of management journals.

Our study examines geographic diversity in editorial boards in Management over a 20-year period. It uses secondary data from 57 journals covering approximately 16,000 editorial board members.

We found that the geographic diversity of editorial boards (EBs) has increased in the last 20 years, but it is still low for most management journals. Further, two factors partly predict the geographic diversity of EBs of management journals: the editor’s country of residence and the field of research.

Continued active management by editors, professional associations and individual academics alike is necessary to ensure that our editorial boards properly reflect the diverse management community.

The autors: " We acknowledge that maximum geographic diversity in editorial boards does not necessarily equate with maximum innovative research and growth in knowledge. As suggested by Hodgson and Rothman (1999) for the institutional concentration of economics journals, there might be a point beyond which geographic diversity is not good for management journals or for knowledge growth. The challenge for future research in this area is to find the proportion, or the range, of geographic diversity in editorial boards that allows for new approaches and knowledge to flourish. This proportion might vary across fields of management study."

 

Source:

Management International ReviewApril 2013, Volume 53, Issue 2, pp 169-187Practicing what We PreachProf. Anne-Wil Harzing,Assoc. Prof. Isabel Metz

 

 

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Management, Education and Competitiveness: Europe, Japan and the United States

Management, Education and Competitiveness: Europe, Japan and the United States | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Globally two processes are striking about modern management education. Firstly, management education is changing rapidly to meet new challenges from business and governments and to improve competitiveness. Secondly, management education has become one of the fastest growing areas in higher education. Management Education and Competitiveness provides a wide overview, including studies by scholars in nine countries in Europe, Japan and the United States. It examines how countries have developed different national courses in spite of strong influence from the American system of management education. It also examines the links between education and business. This collection of essays will be invaluable to managers and professionals in educational research and business administration.

 

Contents:

1 IntroductionPart I Different Systems of Management EducationPart II Management Education and Business

 

Source:

Management, Education and CompetitivenessEurope, Japan and the United StatesEdited by Rolv Petter Amdam

April 2013 by Routledge – 288 pages

Series: Routledge International Studies in Business History

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Organization and role of international collaboration in research production; multinational research studies have a greater research impact than research without an international presence

Organization and role of international collaboration in research production; multinational research studies have a greater research impact than research without an international presence | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

The prevalence of multi-national and cross-disciplinary collaborative in the production of knowledge defines modern science as a social enterprise that extends beyond political, social, and geographic boundaries. The purpose of this study was to assess global trends in the composition and impact of multinational research teams. By examining the bibliometric data of 3.7 million primary research articles published from 1975 to 2005, it was ascertained that the frequency and scale of international collaborations has increased globally. Of note, the publications of many countries associated with lower research output were more often consistently affiliated with other nations across the time frame studied. By analyzing the number of times a publication is cited, it was discovered that multinational research studies have a greater research impact than research without an international presence, although the number of affiliated nations does not strictly correlate with citations. Taken together, this study provides insight into the dynamics of research teams which may better inform us how scientific partnerships between countries may be fostered and which collaborations may be advantageous.


The author:"This study demonstrates that multinationalteams have an increasing role in the production of knowledge and are evolving into larger scale structures of three or more nationalities. It was  also shown that developing countries are more often associated with international  collaboratives when compared to developed countries. Lastly, the citation advantage of  international collaborations diminishes with larger collaborations (three or more national  affiliations) irrespective of the year of publication."

 

Source:

Organization and role of international collaboration in research production  Hsieh, David  PhD thesis, The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix  

2013-03

 

Fulltext: http://arizona.openrepository.com/arizona/bitstream/10150/281178/1/Hsieh,%20David.pdf

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Alternatives to Peer Review in Research Project Funding

Alternatives to Peer Review in Research Project Funding | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Peer review is often considered the gold standard for reviewing research proposals. However, it is not always the best methodology for every research funding process. Public and private funders that support research as wide-ranging as basic science, defence technology and social science use a diverse set of strategies to advance knowledge in their respective fields. This report highlights a range of approaches that offer alternatives to, or modifications of, traditional peer review — alternatives that address many of the shortcomings in peer review effectiveness and efficiency. The appropriateness of these different approaches will depend on the funder's organisational structure and mission, the type of research they wish to fund, as well as short- and long-term financial constraints.

We hope that the information presented in this pack of cards will inspire experimentation amongst research funders by showing how the research funding process can be changed, and give funders the confidence to try novel methods by explaining where and how similar approaches have been used previously. We encourage funders to be as inquisitive about their funding systems as they are about the research they support and make changes in ways that can be subsequently evaluated, for instance using randomised controlled trials. Such an approach would allow researchers to learn more about the effects of different methods of funding and, over time, to improve their knowledge of the most effective ways to support research.

 

Source:

Alternatives to Peer Review in Research Project Funding2013 Update
, RAND Susan Guthrie,Benoit Guerin,Helen Wu,Sharif Ismail,Steven Wooding

Fulltext: http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR100/RR139/RAND_RR139.pdf

 

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New SPARC report on Article-Level Metrics helps decisionmakers to deal with metrics and career decisions

New SPARC report on Article-Level Metrics helps decisionmakers to deal with metrics and career decisions | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

SPARC released a new community resource, Article-Level Metrics -- A SPARC Primer, delving into Article-Level Metrics (ALMs) an emerging hot topic in the scholarly publishing arena. Article-Level Metrics (ALMs) are rapidly emerging as important tools to quantify how individual articles are being discussed, shared, and used. This new SPARC primer is designed to give campus leaders and other interested parties an overview of what ALMs are, why they matter, how they complement established utilities and metrics, and how they might be considered for use in the tenure and promotion process.  

While Article-Level Metrics are not inherently part of the open access movement, they are tools that can be applied in a variety of ways that are of interest to SPARC and its constituents.  The community can develop, distribute, and build upon ALM tools in a manner that opens up impact metrics as never before.   These community efforts are transparent in the methodologies they use to track impact, as well as the technologies behind the processes.  In this manner, ALMs dovetail with not just SPARC's push for open access but various other “open” movements – open science, open data, and open source chief among them.  ALMs that are free to use, modify, and distribute contribute to a world in which information is more easily shared and in which the pace of research and development is accelerated as a consequence.

 

Source:Sparc,

Author: Greg Tananbaum
April, 2013

 

Fulltext: http://www.sparc.arl.org/bm~doc/sparc-alm-primer.pdf

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