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Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university
Challenges and solutions for universities and business schools towards more research influence, academic impact and societal/managerial relevance
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The relationship between tweets and WoS citations; A new framework utilizing the coverage of articles and the correlation between Twitter mentions and citations to facilitate the evaluation of nove...

The relationship between tweets and WoS citations; A new framework utilizing the coverage of articles and the correlation between Twitter mentions and citations to facilitate the evaluation of nove... | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

Data collected by social media platforms have recently been introduced as a new source for indicators to help measure the impact of scholarly research in ways that are complementary to traditional citation-based indicators. Data generated from social media activities related to scholarly content can be used to reflect broad types of impact. This paper aims to provide systematic evidence regarding how often Twitter is used to diffuse journal articles in the biomedical and life sciences. The analysis is based on a set of 1.4 million documents covered by both PubMed and Web of Science (WoS) and published between 2010 and 2012. The number of tweets containing links to these documents was analyzed to evaluate the degree to which certain journals, disciplines, and specialties were represented on Twitter. It is shown that, with less than 10% of PubMed articles mentioned on Twitter, its uptake is low in general. The relationship between tweets and WoS citations was examined for each document at the level of journals and specialties. The results show that tweeting behavior varies between journals and specialties and correlations between tweets and citations are low, implying that impact metrics based on tweets are different from those based on citations. A framework utilizing the coverage of articles and the correlation between Twitter mentions and citations is proposed to facilitate the evaluation of novel social-media based metrics and to shed light on the question in how far the number of tweets is a valid metric to measure research impact.


The authors: "With less than 10% of PubMed documents mentioned, Twitter shows a much lower coverage of scholarly document than other social media platforms such as Mendeley and CiteULike, which is most likely due to the scholarly focus of the latter two. Nevertheless, we were able to demonstrate that there are some journals and specialties in biomedical science that are of greater interest to the Twitter community than others."



Source:


Tweeting biomedicine: an analysis of tweets and citations in the biomedical literatureStefanie Haustein, Isabella Peters, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Mike Thelwall, Vincent LarivièrearXiv:1308.1838v1Fulltext: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1308.1838v1   ;


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Presidencies Derailed: Why University Leaders Fail and How to Prevent It

Presidencies Derailed: Why University Leaders Fail and How to Prevent It | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

University presidents have become as expendable as football coaches—one bad season, scandal, or political or financial misstep and they are sent packing. A derailed presidency can undermine an institution's image, damage its alumni relations, and destroy campus morale, but it can also cost millions of dollars. During 2009 and 2010, fifty college, university, and system presidents either resigned, retired prematurely, or were fired. 

These high-profile campus appointments are increasingly scrutinized by faculty, administrators, alumni, and the media, and problems emerge all too publicly. A combination of constrained resources and a trend toward hiring from outside of academia results in tensions between governing boards and presidents that can quickly erupt. Sometimes presidents are dismissed for performance, financial, or institutional "fit" reasons, but there are nearly always political reasons as well. The details of these employment situations, often masked by confidentially clauses, increasingly emerge as social networks and traditional media buzz with speculation. 

Former university president Stephen Joel Trachtenberg, along with Gerald B. Kauvar and former chancellor E. Grady Bogue, examine what can go wrong—and indeed has—and who in academic institutions has the responsibility to address these issues before things get out of hand.Presidencies Derailed is the first book to explore in depth, from every sector of higher education, the reasons why university presidencies fail and how university and college leadership can prevent these unfortunate situations from happening.

"Without qualification, this book is and will remain the classic on why university presidents succeed or fail. Not to mention the lessons also apply to all top leadership!"—Warren Bennis, University of Southern California

"There are few university presidents like Stephen Joel Trachtenberg—at once knowledgeable, creative, commonsensical, likable, and aggressive (indeed, relentless, even outrageous) in the pursuit of institutional uplift and excellence."—Jose A. Cabranes, U.S. Circuit Judge (New York) and trustee of Columbia University, former trustee of Yale University and Colgate University.

 

Source:

Presidencies Derailed


Why University Leaders Fail and How to Prevent It
Stephen Joel Trachtenberg, Gerald B. Kauvar, and E. Grady Bogue

John Hopkins University Press, 2013

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56 Indicators of Impact

56 Indicators of Impact | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

The authors: "Included in the list are not only quantitative indicators of scholarly impact (such as the H-index), but also qualitative indicators that we might be having some impact on the world (such as meetings with, or even angry letters from, important people). We think, especially in an age of increasing demands for accountability, that we academics ought to own impact, rather than having it determined by someone else."

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Coletta P. Kahn's comment, July 26, 2013 1:05 AM
nicew
Rachel H's curator insight, July 26, 2013 10:02 AM

Humorous wideranging list

Don Westerheijden's curator insight, August 21, 2013 5:13 AM

I'm all for multiple dimensions of impact, but I'd like to keep it on the scholarly side. This list includes Muckracking, Lawsuits, Arrests... You can't be serious! Are we talking of *intended* impacts of higher eudcation? Don't lose 'fintess *of* purpose' from sight.

But it's a nice list to get you thinking (and then start to read on all criticisms of, e.g. the H-index).

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Disrupt or Be Disrupted: An evidence-based blueprint to improving the practice of graduate management education

Disrupt or Be Disrupted: An evidence-based blueprint to improving the practice of graduate management education | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

This book provides business school decision-makers with an evidence-based approach to improving the practice of graduate management education. The book is designed to help navigate the pressures and create revolutionary platforms that leverage a school's unique competitive advantage in a design distinctly tailored for today's business realities.

 

Contents:

Foreword vii

George S. Yip

 

Introduction: The Change Imperative 1
Brooks C. Holtom and Lyman W. Porter

 

Chapter 1 Ensuring and Enhancing Future Value 21
Erich C. Dierdorff, Denis J. Nayden, Dipak C. Jain, and Subhash C. Jain

 

Chapter 2 Framing and Making Strategic Choices 57
Michael Hay

 

Chapter 3 Managing Aspirations, Resources, and Cost Structures 95
Jikyeong Kang and Andrew W. Stark

 

Chapter 4 Intellectual Signatures: Impact on Relevance and Doctoral Programs 131
JC Spender and Rakesh Khurana

 

Chapter 5 Curriculum Matters: Toward a More Holistic Graduate Management Education 179
Sara L. Rynes and Jean M. Bartunek

 

Chapter 6 Overlooked and Unappreciated: What Research Tells Us About How Teaching Must Change 219
Kenneth G. Brown, J. Ben Arbaugh, George Hrivnak, and Amy Kenworthy

 

Chapter 7 Student Engagement: Selection, Management, and Outcomes 259

Daniel C. Feldman

 

Chapter 8 Reclaiming Quality in Graduate Management Education 297
Robert S. Rubin and Frederick P. Morgeson

 

Epilogue 347
Erich C. Dierdorff and Brooks C. Holtom



Source:

Disrupt or Be Disrupted: A Blueprint for Change in Management EducationGMACISBN: 978-1-118-60239-3, Hardcover, 432 pagesAugust 2013, Jossey-Bass


THE EDITORS


Brooks C. Holtom is associate professor of management at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University.

Erich C. Dierdorff is associate professor of management at the Driehaus College of Business at DePaul University in Chicago.


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Coletta P. Kahn's comment, July 26, 2013 1:05 AM
good
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Centres of Excellence (CoE) impacting the Nordic research systems

Centres of Excellence (CoE) impacting the Nordic research systems | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
A new study on schemes for Centres of Excellence (CoE) finds a broad set of impacts on the awarded research groups, as well as local impacts on their host institutions. They study includes 12 CoEs in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.

The long-term flexible funding from the CoE schemes provides more leeway for different kinds of collaboration, new alliances and interdisciplinarity, and risk-taking more generally. In the majority of the studied cases, the centres have attracted much funding in addition to the centre grant. The additional funding enables extensive research activities and boosts the research fields; many centres have the size of regular departments with 50 to 150 researchers, including large numbers of PhDs and postdocs. The role of the centre leader seems particularly important in terms of entrepreneurial capacities and laying the ground for the cumulative advantages of the excellence status and long-term funding.

Added value for host institutions includes increased ambitions in the local research environment, and enhanced ability to recruit both highly competent researchers and students. On the negative side, some experience increased local competition for resources, space, personnel, and frictions generated by new organisational structures and scarce resources.

 

Policy issues needing further elaboration

A general challenge is how to design appropriate and effective CoE policies, taking into account the schemes’ systemic effects and their role and weight within the broader portfolio of policy instruments. The report identifies different perspectives and challenges pertaining to CoE policy, and suggests a dialogue approach to stimulate better understanding of the challenges of CoE schemes and their possible solutions. More direct dialogue between the funding agencies, the CoEs and their host institutions is recommended. The issues to be discussed include how to:

combine concentration of resources (elitism) and good general conditions for researchensure balanced recruitment at the centres, avoiding unintended effectsmaintain CoE competencies and activity after the CoE period and at the same time ensure host institutions’ autonomy and room for strategic thinkingSource:

 

 Excellence initiatives in Nordic research policies 

Policy issues – tensions and options 

Liv Langfeldt, Siri Brorstad Borlaug, Dag Aksnes, Mats Benner, Hanne Foss Hansen, Egil Kallerud, Ernst Kristiansen, Antti Pelkonen, Gunnar Sivertsen 

Working Paper 10/2013 

Fulltext: http://www.nifu.no/files/2013/06/NIFUworkingpaper2013-10.pdf

 

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Doing Research That Matters; Shaping the Future of Management

Doing Research That Matters; Shaping the Future of Management | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Synopsis

If you believe the impact of management research and education is in decline, this book will help you play your part. Doing Research that Matters looks at an old issue from a new perspective, taking a fresh and cross-disciplinary approach to learning how we can contribute with our work to shaping the future of management. Readers are invited to sit back and relax while they are taken on a journey through the views and work of a group of exemplary professionals: top-management gurus Rob Goffee, Robert Kaplan, Barbara Kellerman, Philip Kotler, John Kotter, Howard Gardner, Costas Markides, Roger Martin, Henry Mintzberg and David Ulrich; Nobel Laureates Gerhard Ertl, Doug Osheroff, Elinor Ostrom, Jack Szostack and Harald zur Hausen; and world renowned astrophysicist Margherita Hack. In his quest to become a better management innovator, Marco Busi shares the wisdom he gained from these interviews to highlight patterns in the way pioneers identify a problem worth researching, generate an outcome worth spreading, and generally conduct a career worth having.

 

In an era when the impact of management research and education could be argued is in decline, this book helps readers who want to have a real impact through their management practice and/or research and allows them to truly stand on the shoulders of giants. Doing Research That Matters reveals the ways that exceptional scholars and practitioners have sparked research, done it well, and spread it to others, in the process shaping the way we live and manage. It presents a collection of views and experiences of Nobel Laureates and top management gurus such as Robert Kaplan, Philip Kotler, Howard Gardner, Costas Markides, specifically related to the concepts of research excellence, research process and research outcome. These interviews reveal how their transformative research came about, what drives it, who drives it, how it happens, and why the people who do it feel so passionate about getting the word out. Taking the reader through their life stories it highlights common patterns in the way these people identify a problem worth researching, generate an outcome worth spreading, and generally conduct a worthy professional life.

 

Contents:

Prologue My Declaration of Intent1  Personal Introduction To The Futureers15  Chapter 1 Shaping the Future of Management by Reinventing Management Research25  Understanding What to Aim For35  Chapter 3 The Thrill of Discovery55  Finding Romantic Problems Worth Studying71  Chapter 5 Enjoy the Ride93  Chapter 6 Travelling Solo or in Groups?117  Chapter 7 Share the Experience to Make it More Valuable to You and Others139  Epilogue Shaping the Future of Management Research161  Endnotes181  About the Author197  Copyright   




Source:

Doing Research That Matters Shaping the Future of ManagementMarco Busi (editor), 200 pp, 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, ISBN: 9780857247070
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Nature Publishing Index 2012; NL nr 9 in global country ranking with 8 top Dutch universities in global top 200 universities

Nature Publishing Index 2012; NL nr 9 in global country ranking with 8 top Dutch universities in global top 200 universities | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

The Nature Publishing Index ranks institutions according to the number of primary research articles they publish in Nature journals. Nature and its family of Nature-branded sister journals is world-renowned as the pre-eminent platform for publication of the very best international research, and it is fitting that this portfolio of high quality journals serve as a benchmark for research success and achievement.

There are many ways to assess the research output of institutions, and the Nature Publishing Index is just one that should be used alongside many. Users can drill down to find the abstracts of individual papers that make up the Index allowing deep analysis of where some of the best research across a broad range of fields is coming from.

 

Global top 200 is here: http://www.natureasia.com/en/publishing-index/global/

 

 

Fulltext supplement: http://www.natureasia.com/en/publishing-index/pdf/NPI2012_Global.pdf

 

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Deep Impact: Unintended consequences of journal rank; is using journal rank as an assessment tool a bad scientific practice?

Deep Impact: Unintended consequences of journal rank; is using journal rank as an assessment tool a bad scientific practice? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

Most researchers acknowledge an intrinsic hierarchy in the scholarly journals (‘journal rank’) that they submit their work to, and adjust not only their submission but also their reading strategies accordingly. On the other hand, much has been written about the negative effects of institutionalizing journal rank as an impact measure. So far, contributions to the debate concerning the limitations of journal rank as a scientific impact assessment tool have either lacked data, or relied on only a few studies. In this review, we present the most recent and pertinent data on the consequences of our current scholarly communication system with respect to various measures of scientific quality (such as utility/citations, methodological soundness, expert ratings or retractions). These data corroborate previous hypotheses: using journal rank as an assessment tool is bad scientific practice. Moreover, the data lead us to argue that any journal rank (not only the currently-favored Impact Factor) would have this negative impact. Therefore, we suggest that abandoning journals altogether, in favor of a library-based scholarly communication system, will ultimately be necessary. This new system will use modern information technology to vastly improve the filter, sort and discovery functions of the current journal system.

 

The authors:

"We would favor bringing scholarly communication back to the research institutions in an archival publication system in which both software, raw data and their text descriptions are archived and made accessible, after peer-review and with scientifically-tested metrics accruing reputation in a constantly improving reputation system (Eve, 2012). This
reputation system would be subjected to the same standards of scientific scrutiny as are commonly applied to all scientific matters and evolve to minimize gaming and maximize the alignment of researchers’ interests with those of science (which are currently misaligned Consequences of Journal Rank (Nosek et al., 2012)). Only an elaborate ecosystem of a multitude of metrics can provide the flexibility to capitalize on the small fraction of the multi-faceted scientific output that is actually quantifiable. Such an ecosystem would evolve such that the only evolutionary stable strategy is to try and do the best science one can."

 

Source:

Citation: Brembs B, Button K and Munafò M (2013). Deep Impact: Unintended consequences of journal rank. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 7:291. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00291

Received: 25 Jan 2013; Accepted: 03 Jun 2013.

doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00291

 

Keywords: Impact Factor, Journal Ranking, Statistics as Topic, misconduct, Fraud, Publishing, Open access, scholarly communication, Libraries, Library Services

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CWTS Journal Indicators: free access to over 20.000 journals indexed by Scopus; business & management are covered

CWTS Journal Indicators: free access to over 20.000 journals indexed by Scopus; business & management are covered | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
CWTS Journal Indicators provides free access to bibliometric indicators on scientific journals. The indicators have been calculated by Leiden University’s Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS) based on the Scopus bibliographic database produced by Elsevier. Indicators are available for over 20,000 journals indexed in the Scopus database.CWTS Journal Indicators offers a number of bibliometric indicators on scientific journals. These indicators have been calculated based on the Scopus bibliographic database produced by Elsevier. A key indicator offered by CWTS Journal Indicators is the SNIP indicator, where SNIP stands for source normalized impact per paper. Indicators

CWTS Journal Indicators currently provides four indicators:

P. The number of publications of a source in the past three years.RIP. The raw impact per publication, calculated as the number of citations given in the present year to publications in the past three years divided by the total number of publications in the past three years. RIP is fairly similar to the well-known journal impact factor. Like the journal impact factor, RIP does not correct for differences in citation practices between scientific fields.SNIP. The source normalized impact per publication, calculated as the number of citations given in the present year to publications in the past three years divided by the total number of publications in the past three years. The difference with RIP is that in the case of SNIP citations are normalized in order to correct for differences in citation practices between scientific fields. Essentially, the longer the reference list of a citing publication, the lower the value of a citation originating from that publication. A detailed explanation is offered in our scientific paper.% self cit. The percentage of self citations of a source, calculated as the percentage of all citations given in the present year to publications in the past three years that originate from the source itself.

 

In the calculation of the above indicators, only publications that are classified as article, conference paper, or review in Scopus are considered. Publications of other document types are ignored. Citations originating from such publications are ignored as well. Furthermore, citations are not counted if they originate from special types of sources, in particular trade journals and sources with very few references to other sources (for more details, see our paper).

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Business Schools are Driving Innovation in the Domestic Economy UK according to new ABS report

Business Schools are Driving Innovation in the Domestic Economy UK according to new ABS report | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

The final report identifies opportunities for practical action to increase the impact of British business schools on innovation and growth in the United Kingdom economy. It provides specific guidance for business schools and universities, for faculty and students, and for the government. Together, the Task Force believes that the actions proposed can make a significant difference to the contribution that British business schools make to the economy in which they operate.

 

There are six areas where the independent Task Force think change is needed:
1.Design practice into courses.
2.Bring more practitioner experience into the faculty.
3.Develop and manage company relationships institutionally.
4.Improve measurement and assessment of research impact.
5.Promote research in larger teams, and centres with multi-dimensional roles.
6.Move to more distinctly defined roles for different institutions.

 

Professor Thorpe said:

“The six areas of action we recommend in our report are independently valuable but are mutually reinforcing. The main focus for action is by the schools themselves, and by their faculty members. Changes that the government can make to research evaluation and funding, and to support enhanced academic training, will also be important. Finally, businesses have a major opportunity to benefit from closer engagement with an easier-to-access and refocused business and management academic community. As businesses see those benefits, they should be willing to play an increasing role in both delivering business education and supporting research – by providing guidance on key problems, and the access and financial support needed to support practically relevant research.”

 

Richard Rawlinson said:

“Our overall objective was to outline how British business schools can build on meritorious but isolated examples of success to create a reliable, general system that better directs and supports the considerable resources of the business-school sector towards effective engagement, innovation and impact – while continuing to attract students and command academic esteem.

 

We see none of our recommendations as contrary to academic goals, or to success in student recruitment. On the contrary, our view is that engaged research can be excellent research, and that schools that engage with business and innovate in pedagogy will better compete for students. We aim to influence and focus the efforts of UK government, business and universities on what they can do to make our business schools more effective across the full range of their missions.”
In their response, the ABS formally welcomed the report, endorsed the main findings and recommendations, and thanked its authors and the members of the Task Force for their significant commitment and contribution.

 

Professor Angus Laing, Dean of the School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University and Chair of the Association of Business Schools said:

“I wholeheartedly welcome this independent report, which provides a robust evidence base to inform both policy in respect of supporting economic growth and practice within the business school community.  There is much work for the ABS, our members, government, business, funders and other stakeholder bodies to do to respond to deliver the culture change recommended.”

 

“Reigniting growth in the aftermath of the global financial crisis remains the underlying priority for the government. Against the backdrop of significant macroeconomic challenges, microeconomic levers to promote growth and innovation have become increasingly prominent in policy debates. Successive reports from Lord Heseltine and Lord Young have focused attention on providing the economic infrastructure to support the small to mid-sized business community and generating the local conditions conducive to rebalancing the economy away from over dependence on the City. Integral to such an agenda is the recognition of the need to exploit the capabilities of existing institutions rather than engaging, yet again, in the creation of new agencies. Against this backdrop business schools have the potential to play a very significant role to act as local economic anchor institutions.”

 

The recommendations of the Innovation Task Force are wide ranging and the response of the ABS, its partners and other stakeholders will be multiple and will evolve.  The ABS is today (21 May 2013) announcing an initial plan of work to take forward aspects of the recommendations of the report.  Announcements of further work streams will emerge in due course.  The ABS has committed to undertake an annual review of progress against the recommendations and will conduct a five year retrospective review of the impact of the report and the implementation of its recommendations in 2018.

 

Fulltext report: http://www.associationofbusinessschools.org/sites/default/files/130516_absinnovation_web.pdf

 

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International Co-authorship Relations in the Social Science Citation Index: Is Internationalization Leading the Network?

International Co-authorship Relations in the Social Science Citation Index: Is Internationalization Leading the Network? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

We analyze international co-authorship relations in the Social Science Citation Index 2011 using all citable items in the DVD-version of this index. Network statistics indicate four groups of nations: (i) an Asian-Pacific one to which all Anglo-Saxon nations (including the UK and Ireland) are attributed; (ii) a continental European one including also the Latin-American countries; (iii) the Scandinavian nations; and (iv) a community of African nations. Within the EU-28 (including Croatia), eleven of the EU-15 states have dominant positions. Collapsing the EU-28 into a single node leads to a bi-polar structure between the US and EU-28; China is part of the US-pole. We develop an information-theoretical test to distinguish whether international collaborations or domestic collaborations prevail; the results are mixed, but the international dimension is more important than the national one in the aggregated sets (this was found in both SSCI and SCI). In France, however, the national distribution is more important than the international one, while the reverse is true for most European nations in the core group (UK, Germany, the Netherlands, etc.). Decomposition of the USA in terms of states shows a similarly mixed result; more US states are domestically than internationally oriented (in both SSCI and SCI). The international networks have grown during the last decades in addition to the national ones, but not by replacing them.

 

The authors:"... the operationalization teaches us that there is no once-and-for-all answer to this relation. Countries and states—and also disciplines!—have progressed differently in terms of internationalization. However, the test at the aggregated level suggests that the international dimension prevails as a predictor of the domestic one and not the reverse. This indicates that the cybernetic expectation that the next-order level is constructed bottom-up, but tends to take over top-down control, may already have passed a point of no return"

 

Source:

International Co-authorship Relations in the Social Science Citation Index: Is Internationalization Leading the Network?Loet Leydesdorff, Han Woo Park, Caroline WagnerarXiv:1305.4242 [2013]
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In search of relevance: The changing contract between science and society; introducing the credibility cycle as heuristic

In search of relevance: The changing contract between science and society; introducing the credibility cycle as heuristic | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

This paper reflects on the relevance of academic science. Relevance plays a central role in what we define as the ‘contract’ between (academic) science and society. The manifestations of relevance in the daily practice of academic research can be studied using the credibility cycle. Together, the science—society contract and the credibility cycle enable a systematic analysis of relevance in scientific disciplines. This is illustrated with a case study of academic chemistry in The Netherlands. We conclude that science's search for relevance is not new, but that its meaning changes together with changing ideas about the potential benefits of scientific research.

 

The authors:"The ‘relation between science and society’ and ‘scientific practice’ are both vague concepts trying to grasp complex pieces of reality. The strength of our approach is that we have developed a model in which
both are reduced to something that does justice to reality and at the same time allows for systematic analysis. Our notion of the contract clearly articulates the relation between science and society in terms of a limited
number of variables. Similarly, the credibility cycle may not give an exhaustive overview of all activities involved in scientific research but it does
describe the general pattern in which all activities have a position. Assuming that all scientists’ actions aim to contribute to the conversion of credibility, the form of this cycle becomes a crucial factor determining
scientific practice.

 

Source:

Laurens K Hessels, Harro van Lenteand Ruud Smits

In search of relevance: The changing contract between science and society Science and Public Policy (2009) 36(5): 387-401 doi:10.3152/030234209X442034


Corresponding dissertation (2010) is here fultext:

http://www.uu.nl/SiteCollectionDocuments/Corp_UU%20en%20Nieuws/Proefschrift%20Laurens%20Hessels.pdf


 

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Research staff and public engagement: a UK study

Research staff and public engagement: a UK study | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant ‘Pathways to Impact’. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data—from a web-based survey and three focus groups—are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges involved in participating in them are profound. While researchers report practical needs, such as for logistical support or communication training, key barriers relate to the conditions of contract research more generally, and specifically to job insecurity, transiency, and lack of autonomy.

 

The author:"..both public engagement and research staff sit somewhat uneasily within the dominant model of research as an essentially publication-focused, time-intensive activity—rather than, say, a process which incorporates public engagement, teaching, or commercial activities—both are marginalised. As the practical challenges to public engagement reported above attest, training in the skills necessary for public communication and increased funding and support for it are certainly important. What will ultimately be more influential in normalising public engagement in the manner that is currently being advocated, however, is a broadening of what—and who—is considered valuable within the academy."

 

Source:

Higher EducationMay 2013Research staff and public engagement: a UK studySarah R. Davies

 

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Got the MEMO? Management Education is Moving On

Got the MEMO? Management Education is Moving On | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Purpose - The aim of this paper is to present the author’s findings from eight conferences, organized over the course of four years by two major management education organizations in the US, and pertaining to the trend of management education.


Design/methodology/approach - This paper offers a constructive critical review of the trend of management education, and the need for greater interaction and more hands-on approaches, against the reality of adhering to requirements of accrediting bodies.


Findings - The trend toward more interaction and a broader variety, as well as greater inclusion of art and other areas in management education is unstoppable. The growing interest in workshop submissions and attendance at major conferences is proof of that. However, it may take a while before all stakeholders will support this reality optimally.


Research limitations/implications - The investigation has only been implemented in the US, and only within two major management conferences. Scholars of management might consider exploring this trend in major management conferences on other continents as well.


Practical implications - Management educators may get encouraged to explore alternative ways of engaging their students, and seek outlets to share these new findings on a larger scale. The fact that academic publishers also seem to follow the trend of deviating from strong theoretical foci could be considered hopeful.


Originality/value - This article presents comparative data of two major conferences, which are highly popular within the world of management education, but have never been placed alongside one another as such. Furthermore, the article reveals a trend that has thus far only been discussed as an experience- based or research-based one, but was not yet brought within the scope of its implementation on globally attended forums as the ones discussed in this article.

 

Source:

Joan Marques, (2013) "Got the MEMO? Management Education is Moving On", On the Horizon, Vol. 21 Iss: 4

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Overview of the Altmetrics Landscape; publishers and service providers listed

Overview of the Altmetrics Landscape; publishers and service providers listed | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

While the impact of article citations has been examined for decades, the “altmetrics” movement has exploded in the past year. Altmetrics tracks the activity on the Social Web and looks at research outputs besides research articles. Publishers of scientific research have enabled altmetrics on their articles, open source applications are available for platforms to display altmetrics on scientific research, and subscription models have been created that provide altmetrics. In the future, altmetrics will be used to help identify the broader impact of research and to quickly identify high-impact research.

 

Altmetrics are generally categorized in the following ways:
• Usage—HTML views, PDF/XML downloads, book holdings, etc.
• Captures—Bookmarks, favorites, readers, groups, etc.
• Mentions—Blog posts, news stories, Wikipedia articles, comments, reviews, etc.

• Social Media—User activity from Twitter, Google+, Facebook, etc.
• Citations—CrossRef, PubMed Central, Web of Science, Scopus, Microsoft Academic Search, etc.

 

Source:

Richard Cave, "Overview of the Altmetrics Landscape" (2012). Proceedings of the Charleston Library Conference.
http://dx.doi.org/10.5703/1288284315124

 

Fulltext:

http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1381&context=charleston

 

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Why Has the Number of Scientific Retractions Increased?. a new type of researcher emerging..the 'serial retractor'?

Why Has the Number of Scientific Retractions Increased?. a new type of researcher emerging..the 'serial retractor'? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Background

The number of retracted scientific publications has risen sharply, but it is unclear whether this reflects an increase in publication of flawed articles or an increase in the rate at which flawed articles are withdrawn.

Methods and Findings

We examined the interval between publication and retraction for 2,047 retracted articles indexed in PubMed. Time-to-retraction (from publication of article to publication of retraction) averaged 32.91 months. Among 714 retracted articles published in or before 2002, retraction required 49.82 months; among 1,333 retracted articles published after 2002, retraction required 23.82 months (p<0.0001). This suggests that journals are retracting papers more quickly than in the past, although recent articles requiring retraction may not have been recognized yet. To test the hypothesis that time-to-retraction is shorter for articles that receive careful scrutiny, time-to-retraction was correlated with journal impact factor (IF). Time-to-retraction was significantly shorter for high-IF journals, but only ~1% of the variance in time-to-retraction was explained by increased scrutiny. The first article retracted for plagiarism was published in 1979 and the first for duplicate publication in 1990, showing that articles are now retracted for reasons not cited in the past. The proportional impact of authors with multiple retractions was greater in 1972–1992 than in the current era (p<0.001). From 1972–1992, 46.0% of retracted papers were written by authors with a single retraction; from 1993 to 2012, 63.1% of retracted papers were written by single-retraction authors (p<0.001).

Conclusions

The increase in retracted articles appears to reflect changes in the behavior of both authors and institutions. Lower barriers to publication of flawed articles are seen in the increase in number and proportion of retractions by authors with a single retraction. Lower barriers to retraction are apparent in an increase in retraction for “new” offenses such as plagiarism and a decrease in the time-to-retraction of flawed work.

 

Source:

Why Has the Number of Scientific Retractions Increased?R. Grant Steen mail, Arturo Casadevall, Ferric C. FangPlosOne 2013. 

Fulltext:

http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchObject.action?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0068397&representation=PDF

 

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Dramatic Growth of Open Access Journals and documents..but will it all create real impact?

Dramatic Growth of Open Access Journals and documents..but will it all create real impact? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Kudos to the Directory of Open Access Journals for an oustanding second quarter! In the past few months, DOAJ has added 912 titles for a total of 9,759 journals. That's a net growth rate of over 10 titles per day, up from the previous rate of over 3 titles per day. At this rate it won't be long before DOAJ exceeds the milestone of 10,000 journals. PubMedCentral growth continues to be very strong in spite of what looks like a bit of backsliding. The percentage of articles published with free fulltext available continues to grow at a steady pace and is now up to 25%. There are now 69 more journals are actively participating in PMC while there has been a drop of 102 journals providing immediate free access and of 16 journals making all articles open access. Highwire Free shows a similar pattern - overall strong growth - more than 60,000 free fulltext articles added this quarter for a total of 2.3 million and an increase of 2 completely free sites with a drop of 6 sites with free back issues. Overall the pattern for journals is very strong growth in full open access and cooperation with PMC, suggesting that the backsliders are a very small minority.

 

Source:

The Dramatic Growth of Open Access: June 30, 2013Heather MorrisonAssistant Professor, University of Ottawa École des sciences de l’information / School of Information Studieshttp://www.sis.uottawa.ca/

 

 

http://poeticeconomics.blogspot.ca/2013/07/june-30-2013-dramatic-growth-of-open_4.html

http://www.ruor.uottawa.ca/en/handle/10393/24279

 

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Ken Morrison's comment, July 9, 2013 11:01 AM
The 'impact' side of this trend will be interesting to watch.
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Altmetrics: New Indicators for Scientific Communication in Web 2.0

Altmetrics: New Indicators for Scientific Communication in Web 2.0 | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

In this paper we review the socalled altmetrics or alternative metrics. This concept raises from the development of new indicators based on Web 2.0, for the evaluation of the research and academic activity. The basic assumption is that variables such as mentions in blogs, number of twits or of researchers bookmarking a research paper for instance, may be legitimate indicators for measuring the use and impact of scientific publications. In this sense, these indicators are currently the focus of the bibliometric community and are being discussed and debated. We describe the main platforms and indicators and we analyze as a sample the Spanish research output in Communication Studies. Comparing traditional indicators such as citations with these new indicators. The results show that the most cited papers are also the ones with a highest impact according to the altmetrics. We conclude pointing out the main shortcomings these metrics present and the role they may play when measuring the research impact through 2.0 platforms.

 

The authors:

"If these indicators are indeed wanted, beyond mere experiments and academic studies, for use in the evaluation of scientific activity, there is no doubt that the many theoretical (significance), methodological (valid sources) and technical (normalisation) problems should still be resolved. These indicators should clearly be used for measuring the social impact of science and, above all, for measuring the impact or immediate visibility of publications, an impossibiity for citation. The new metrics have a very short journey, with an initial burst of activity capturing the visibility of papers at the very moment of publication (Priem & Hemmiger, 2010). This facet complements the classic indicators and even expert reviews, which altmetrics should not aspire to substitute, a situation and a function noted by most scientists"

 

Source:

Altmetrics: New Indicators for Scientific Communication in Web 2.0Daniel Torres-Salinas, Alvaro Cabezas-Clavijo, Evaristo Jimenez-Contreras2013DOI:10.3916/C41-2013-05Cite as:

arXiv:1306.6595

 

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Management Education for the World : A Vision for Business Schools Serving People and Planet

Management Education for the World :  A Vision for Business Schools Serving People and Planet | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Management Education for the World speaks to everybody concerned or passionate about the future of management education: consultants, facilitators, entrepreneurs and leaders in organizations of any kind, as well as policymakers and others with an interest in new and transformative thinking in the field. In particular, teachers, researchers, students and administrators will find it an invaluable resource on their journey.

For many years commentators have described what is wrong with business schools – characterizing them as the breeding grounds of a culture of greed and self enrichment in global business at the expense of the rest of society and of nature. Management Education for the World is a response to this critique and a handbook for those seeking to create knowledge for and educate a new breed of business leaders. It presents a vision for the transformation of management education in service of the common good. And it explains how such a vision can be implemented in practice. The 50+20 vision, as it is also known, was developed through a collaborative initiative between the Globally Responsible Leadership Initiative, the World Business School Council for Sustainable Business and the U.N.-backed Principles of Responsible Management Education and draws on the expertise of sustainability scholars, business and business school leaders and thought leaders from many other walks of life.

This book explores the 21st Century agenda of management education identifying three fundamental goals: educating and developing globally responsible leaders, enabling business organizations to serve the common good, and engaging in the transformation of business and the economy. It is a clarion call of service to society for a sector lost between the interests of faculty, business and the schools themselves at the expense of people and planet. It sees business education stepping up to the plate with the ability of holding and creating a space to provide responsible leadership for a sustainable world embodied in the central and unifying element of the 50+20 vision, the collaboratory.

 

Source:

Management Education for the WorldA Vision for Business Schools Serving People and PlanetKatrin Muff, Thomas Dyllick, Mark Drewell, John North, Paul Shrivastava and Jonas Haertle2013, EE, ISBN: 9781782547624DOI: 10.4337/9781782547648Pages: 256
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Taking the reins as a business school dean; challenge for business schools is to build curricula and supportive programs that account for current and future business landscapes

Taking the reins as a business school dean; challenge for business schools is to build curricula and supportive programs that account for current and future business landscapes | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Business school deans have an expansive and complex role in the fabric of the universities and communities served by their programs. Yet many newly minted deans discover that the experiences they acquire while climbing the ranks of academia or industry do not adequately prepare them for their new responsibilities. While some deans served in department chair roles where they managed a small group of faculty peers, becoming a dean requires them to oversee a broader range of issues and operations. Rather than primarily managing individual projects, they assume responsibility for a school’s research portfolio. Rather than managing relationships with a small group of faculty peers, they assume responsibility for cultivating relationships with internal staff and external stakeholders, including donors, alumni, the media, and the business community. In addition, deans assume responsibility for their school’s finances and their contribution to the broader university, and they must advocate the interests of their business school among a university’s senior leadership, donors, and government stakeholders to obtain the requisite resources to sustain programs or grow new ones. Similarly, industry experience by itself may not adequately prepare an executive-turned-dean to effectively recruit faculty or navigate change in an academic culture.

 

Incoming business school deans face a profoundly challenging environment. A worldwide economic downturn resulted in declining demand for MBA programs at many schools. Massive online open courses (MOOCs) undermine traditional models of education, and recruiters and employers are demanding a higher standard of talent from all schools. In addition, third-party rankings are significantly influencing schools’ reputations, the number of applications they receive, and their revenues. All of these challenges require incoming deans to shape and execute thoughtful responses.

 

In 2012, Deloitte’s University Relations Program interviewed 20 business school deans about their transition experiences and piloted a transition lab to help them frame critical priorities, evaluate their organizations, and develop a strategy to advance their agenda while remaining mindful of their myriad stakeholders. In an attempt to help business school deans effectively transition into their new roles, this paper synthesizes key findings from our interviews, our labs, and related experiences on executive transitions and business school strategy.

 

Contents:

1 The hardest thing
2 The four faces of a business school dean
3 Navigating the time, talent, and relationships triangle
4 Seven ways to garner a good start
5 A privilege and opportunity

 

The authors:"The dean role is a unique privilege and opportunity to shape not only a school but a generation of future leaders. For many business schools, the status quo is incompatible with the realities of the emerging business landscape. Deans will have to work as strategists and catalysts with their faculty members to adapt business schools to the digitization of education and work life, new demands from recruiters for global managers, specialization for specific competencies and industries, and the needs for lifelong learning and new career models with extensive freelance work outside of a traditional corporate structure. The challenge for business schools is to build curricula and supportive programs that account for current and future business landscapes."

 

Source:

Taking the reins as a business school deanDr. Ajit Kambil, Shaun Budnik

Deloitte University Press, Published April 30, 2013

http://cdn.dupress.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/DUP344_Business-School-Dean_vFINAL.pdf?7fc8d4

 

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Research impact and scholars’ geographical diversity

Research impact and scholars’ geographical diversity | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

In recent years there has been a sharp increase in collaborations among scholars and there are studies on the effects of scientific collaboration on scholars’ performance. This study examines the hypothesis that geographically diverse scientific collaboration is associated with research impact. Here, the approach is differentiated from other studies by: (a) focusing on publications rather than researchers or institutes; (b) considering the geographical diversity of authors of each publication; (c) considering the average number of citations a publication receives per year (time-based normalization of citations) as a surrogate for its impact; and (d) not focusing on a specific country (developed or developing) or region. Analysis of the collected bibliometric data shows that a publication impact is significantly and positively associated with all related geographical collaboration indicators. But publication impact has a stronger association with the numbers of external collaborations at department and institution levels (inter-departmental and inter-institutional collaborations) compared to internal collaborations. Conversely, national collaboration correlates better with impact than international collaboration.

 

 

The authors:"The fact that international collaboration has a lower correlation to publications’ impact may bedue to the apparent challenge of collaboration across national and cultural boundaries. The reason for intra-departmentalcollaboration’s low correlation to publications’ impact may be explained by exchanging redundant knowledge among theresearchers in the same departments (as usually have access to similar kinds of resources and equipment).Therefore, the findings support that having co-authors with diverse knowledge and skills enhance scholars’ knowledgeand experience through decreasing the research project process, including writing and revision process of publication (asthe output of the work) and also improving the impact."

 

Source:

 

Journal of Informetrics

Volume 7, Issue 3, July 2013, Pages 683–692

  Research impact and scholars’ geographical diversityAlireza Abbasi,   Ali Jaafarihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2013.04.004,
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Marilyn Korhonen's comment, June 10, 2013 4:23 PM
The results reveal that research impact is positively associated with all levels of collaboration metrics. Thus, in general, the publications with more diverse authors (collaborations) have better impact especially if the collaborations are more external rather than internal, considering their affiliations’ departments and institutes but more internal collaborations considering their country.
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Towards The Third Generation University (3GU); moving from the medieval to the science-based towards Science Based Know-How Creation and Exploitation

Towards The Third Generation University (3GU); moving from the medieval to the science-based towards Science Based Know-How Creation and Exploitation | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Description
Universities are undergoing massive change, evolving from science-based, government-funded institutions into ‘international know-how hubs’ dubbed third generation universities, or 3GUs. J.G. Wissema explores this dramatic change, tracing the historic development of universities, and exploring the technology-based enterprises, technostarters and financiers for start-ups and young enterprises that are the main partners of these 3GUs. He goes on to illustrate that universities play a new role as incubators of new science or technology based commercial activities and take an active role in the exploitation of the knowledge they create. The book concludes with suggestions regarding the way in which changes in the university’s mission should be reflected in subsequent organisational changes.

Contents
Contents: Introduction Part I: Towards the Third Generation University 1. From the Medieval and Humboldt University to the Third Generation University 2. Contours of the Third Generation University 3. Two Case Studies Part II: Know-How Creation and Exploitation 4. Creation of Knowledge and Value in Industry 5. Technostarters 6. Financing Technostarters and Spinouts Part III: Organising the Third Generation University 7. Organisational Structure and Management Style 8. The Know-How Commercialisation Function 9. Implementation and Assessment of 3GU Appendices Bibliography Index

Reviews:

‘The book is very well-structured. . . [It] provides a timely contribution to a conversation with a long history, and debates over the nature and purpose of the university seem certain to figure prominently in educational discourse for many years to come.’
– Peter Roberts, Journal of Educational Administrative and History

‘Drawing from experience as a professor in innovation and entrepreneurship and as a consultant to universities, Wissema offers deep insights into management of the modern universities. The book is well-written and all those university administrators who wish to transform their universities into entrepreneurial universities would find the book very useful.’
– Jandhyala B.G. Tilak, Journal of Educational Planning and Administration

‘In Central and Eastern Europe, universities are struggling to adapt to the new economic and institutional situations. The concept of the Third Generation University is powerful in giving direction. In addition, the book offers much practical advice, taken from the author’s experience as a consultant to universities.’
– Marjan Bojadzhiev, University American College Skopje, Macedonia

‘Although the quality of university management makes or breaks the effectiveness and efficiency of a university, most university managers come unprepared to the job while only few books and courses in the subject are available. This book offers, amongst other things, welcome insights into the issue of university management. In Wageningen, the concept of the Third Generation University has proven to be inspiring, challenging and operational. It enabled us to develop science for Impact for a variety of new stakeholders.’
– M. Kropff, Wageningen University and Research Centre, the Netherlands

This book demonstrates that universities are subject to fundamental change, evolving from science-based, monodisciplinary institutions into transfunctional, ‘international know-how hubs’ named ‘third generation universities’ or 3GUs.

J.G. Wissema explores the combination of forces that propel this dramatic change, tracing the historic development of universities, and exploring the technology-based enterprises, technostarters and financiers for start-ups and young enterprises that are the main partners of these 3GUs. He goes on to illustrate that universities play a new role as incubators of new science- or technology-based enterprises and take an active role in the exploitation of the knowledge they create. The book concludes with suggestions regarding the way in which changes in the university’s mission should be reflected in subsequent organisational changes.

Offering practical advice on the route forward for universities, and elucidating the role of education in entrepreneurship, this unique book will prove invaluable to academics and practitioners who seek to implement and facilitate changes for 3GU status. It will also appeal to students and researchers with an interest in business and management, education, entrepreneurship and public policy on education.

Source:
Towards The Third Generation University; Managing the University in Transition. J. G. Wissema. Edward Elgar, 2009 272 pp Hardback 978 1 84844 216 0
 
ebook isbn 978 1 84844 618 2

 

J.G. Wissema, Managing Director, J.G. Wissema Associates bv and Professor Emeritus of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. http://www.wissema.com

 

Summary: http://www.wissema.com/sites/default/files/download/Summary%203GU.pdf

 

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Public No More: A New Path to Excellence for America’s Public Universities; how research universities can survive with reduced subsidies and increased competition from both non-profit and for-profi...

Public No More: A New Path to Excellence for America’s Public Universities; how research universities can survive with reduced subsidies and increased competition from both non-profit and for-profi... | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Public No More examines the quickly changing environment within higher education, including the permanent decline in state support for public universities. This book raises the question of how research universities can survive with reduced subsidies and increased competition from both non-profit and growing for-profit institutions. Authors Gary C. Fethke and Andrew J. Policano, both longtime university administrators, offer a strategic framework for determining how tuition and access should be set and how universities should decide on quality and program scope. Throughout the text, real-world examples illustrate successful and unsuccessful adoptions of the authors' proposals. 

Leadership within public higher education, policymakers, and researchers alike will find Public No More to be a sober and well-grounded guide to what lies ahead for universities across the nation.

 

Source:


Public No More; A New Path to Excellence for America’s Public Universities

Gary C. Fethke and Andrew J. Policano


Stanford University Press, 2012

 

Review: "Fethke and Policano do an excellent job of pinpointing the key issues in public higher education, and presenting strategic management solutions using lucid examples. Rigorous, but not overly technical, this book has a timely message, not just for higher education, but for the analysis of any situation in which strategic choices must be made and change is eminent."—John Kraft, Dean and Professor, University of Florida


Gary C. Fethke served as a university administrator for over twenty-five years, as Dean of the Business School and Interim President at the University of Iowa. He is the Leonard A. Hadley Professor of Leadership in the Tippie College of Business. 
Andrew J. Policano is the Dean's Leadership Circle Professor and Dean of the Paul Merage School of Business at the University of California at Irvine. He is widely recognized for his innovative leadership, which spans twenty-two years in three deanships.

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Are elite journals declining now emerging and established journals are publishing an increasing proportion of most cited papers?

Are elite journals declining now emerging and established journals are publishing an increasing proportion of most cited papers? | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it

Abstract:

Previous work indicates that over the past 20 years, the highest quality work have been published in an increasingly diverse and larger group of journals. In this paper we examine whether this diversification has also affected the handful of elite journals that are traditionally considered to be the best. We examine citation patterns over the past 40 years of 7 long-standing traditionally elite journals and 6 journals that have been increasing in importance over the past 20 years. To be among the top 5% or 1% cited papers, papers now need about twice as many citations as they did 40 years ago. Since the late 1980s and early 1990s elite journals have been publishing a decreasing proportion of these top cited papers. This also applies to the two journals that are typically considered as the top venues and often used as bibliometric indicators of "excellence", Science and Nature. On the other hand, several new and established journals are publishing an increasing proportion of most cited papers. These changes bring new challenges and opportunities for all parties. Journals can enact policies to increase or maintain their relative position in the journal hierarchy. Researchers now have the option to publish in more diverse venues knowing that their work can still reach the same audiences. Finally, evaluators and administrators need to know that although there will always be a certain prestige associated with publishing in "elite" journals, journal hierarchies are in constant flux so inclusion of journals into this group is not permanent.

 

The authors: "With all these new journals, elite and otherwise, researchers now have increasingly more venues where they can submit their papers, and benefit from a visibility and availability that formerly was possible only for the most widely distributed journals, the “elite” journals. Given the high rejection rates of elite journals, around 93% for Science, for example, researchers might prefer to save time and submit their papers to other journals that ultimately will reach the same audience faster and potentially obtain as many citations. In the digital age it is relatively easy to determine the actual citation rate of individual papers or authors, so the value of a journal’s reputation is now less important. Nevertheless, researchers might still prefer to publish in elite journals. Whether justifiable or not, journal reputation still has some value to the papers therein, through a Mathew effect (Larivière and Gingras 2010), particularly when the research is viewed and evaluated by non-experts."

 

Source:

Are elite journals declining?Vincent Lariviere, George A. Lozano, Yves Gingras(Submitted on 24 Apr 2013)arXiv:1304.6460 
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From bench to bedside: The societal orientation of research leaders

From bench to bedside: The societal orientation of research leaders | Dual impact of research; towards the impactelligent university | Scoop.it
Abstract

This paper answers five questions about the societal impact of research. Firstly, we examine the opinions of research group leaders about the increased emphasis on societal impact, i.e. does it influence their research agenda, communication with stakeholders, and knowledge dissemination to stakeholders? Furthermore, we investigate the quality of their societal output. We also study whether the societal and scholarly productivity of academic groups are positively or negatively related. In addition, we investigate which managerial and organisational factors (e.g. experience of the principal investigator, group size and funding) influence societal output. Finally, we show for one case (virology) that societal impact is also visible through indirect links. Our study shows that research group leaders have a slightly positive attitude towards the increased emphasis on the societal impact of research. The study also indicates a wide variety of societal-oriented output. Furthermore, the societal and scientific productivity of academic groups are unrelated, suggesting that stimulating social relevance requires specific organisational and contextual interventions.

 

The authors:"The process of knowledge transfer to society may be improved considerably by supporting the societal orientation of research leaders in a
more explicit manner. The current incentive structure in the science system, including research careers, still seems largely based on scientific performance in a narrow sense. It has been pointed out that ties to society and political bodies do not lead to pay-offs that can be mapped by the conventional indicators of successful scientific performance, including contract funding. Universities, for example, like to exhibit their societal engagement, but, in practice, these activities remain largely unrewarded."

Key wordssocietal outputresearch groupsresearch fundingscience communicationincentive structuresscience system

Source:

Inge van der Weijden,Maaike Verbreeand Peter van den Besselaar

From bench to bedside: The societal orientation of research leaders: The case of biomedical and health research in the Netherlands Science and Public Policy (2012) 39(3): 285-303 doi:10.1093/scipol/scr003

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