DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges
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DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges
Provides resources to support students in Preliminary Geography course topic Global Challenges study area of Population, Development and Natural Resources
Curated by Sally Egan
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The Environmental Cost of Consumption

The Environmental Cost of Consumption | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it

Environmental artist J Henry Fair captures the beauty and destruction of industrial sites to illustrate the hidden impacts of the things we buy – the polluted air, destroyed habitats and the invisible carbon heating the planet


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Sally Egan's insight:
Photographic essay illustrates the impacts of human use of resources. The beautiful images illustrate the extreme impact on the environment.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 25, 3:23 PM

This artistic portrayal shows the extent of the massive modifications we've made to the landscape with some striking examples.  Pictured above is one of 17 images in this article that promotes the launch of the new book entitled, Industrial Scars: the Environmental Cost of Consumption.  In the image above we see mountaintop coal mining in West Virginia.  "This lonely stand of trees disappeared in barely a day. The small bulldozer on the upper level pushes loose material down to the loader, which scoops it up into the next earth mover in line, which will in turn dump it into a nearby ‘valley fill’, burying the stream there." This might be the most beautiful and ugly set of images that you'll see today. 

 

Tags: pollution, industry, sustainability, images, art, landscape, unit 6 industry.

Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 6:30 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impact of human activity on environments.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 5:37 PM

Production and consumption - interconnections and consequences 

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Falling under the megacity spell - Geography (7,8,10)

Falling under the megacity spell - Geography (7,8,10) | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
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A short video highlighting Jakarta as a mega city. Includes coverage of growth of the city, and focusses on a family who have moved from rural living into the city. Issues relating to housing, employment, access to services are presented along with a range of responses to these challenges at different levels of government, NGO and individual actions.
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Sally Egan's curator insight, May 24, 8:36 PM
A short video addressing the nature of Jakarta as a Mega city. Covers growth of the city, and focusses on a family who have migrated from the rural area to the city. Presents issues or challenges of the city and a range of responses to these at government, NGO and individual levels.
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World Population growth rate shows signs of slowing - eventually. | Geography | tutor2u

World Population growth rate shows signs of slowing - eventually. | Geography | tutor2u | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
Is the world's population going up or down? Well, both - the total population is going through its fastest phase of growth, but the growth rate is starting to s
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Succinct article about slowing of World Population growth rate. Includes an animated population pyramid when site opens.
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Classifications of population movement | Geography | tutor2u

Classifications of population movement | Geography | tutor2u | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
An important aspect of population studies is the movement of people from place to place. As there are many different types of movement it can help to classify t
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A summary of the types of migration relates to Global populaiton population movement topic.

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The Demographic Transition Model (DTM) | Geography | tutor2u

The Demographic Transition Model (DTM) | Geography | tutor2u | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
The DTM is a model of population change from a low stable population to a high stable population as a result of a preliminary fall in the death rate from a high
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Clear explanation of the demographic Transistion Model is provided. Each stage of the process is explanined and includes discussion of the value and issues of such a model in understanding global population changes.

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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

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These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

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Peyton Conner's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:51 AM

This article has an interesting look on the thought that Europe has a clustered population insides it's main land cities. I found it surprising that some of these cities have high unemployment rates but yet are doing very well in their economy. I would think Europe's population would be spreading not coming together. PC

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."


Via Seth Dixon
Sally Egan's insight:

Reflection son teh policy of China in attempts to control population growth and teh lasting effects that this policy has had. After almost 40 years this policy has been changed to allow for ctwo children in an effort to alleviate the growing issues of an ageing populaiton.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

Patty B's curator insight, April 29, 12:31 PM
This was, of course, massive news coming out of China. It is something that needed to be done, at least from the Chinese's standpoint. But this is also an important issue to the entire world. First and foremost, this article ties into the fact that the world's population reached 7 billion within the past couple of years and is continuing to rise. It ties into the fact that the human population is quickly approaching its maximum capacity. While China's new policy may or may not speed up the world population by any amount that will truly matter, any news related to global population at this point in time is a hot topic. But this policy was implemented to reverse some serious issues that have arisen in China as a result of its one-child policy. It's population is made up with a majority of retirement aged folk. China needs to ensure it has enough qualified working-aged people in the future and believe a two-child limit will aid in this happening. So of course China had many economic reasons for ending its one-child policy, but there are also certain social reasons for doing so I think. In a world where many human rights and civil rights issues have found their ways to the forefront of political and social discussions, China must have felt obligated to do something about the one-child policy to keep up with the wave of political correctness sweeping the globe. A one-child policy seemed extremely restrictive in a world that is becoming increasingly more apt to let people make decisions for themselves. 
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INFOGRAPHIC: What's Ahead for an Overpopulated Planet

INFOGRAPHIC: What's Ahead for an Overpopulated Planet | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
Norwich University explains what the future holds for an overpopulated planet.
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This is a great presentation of the changing global population and its implications. Really well set out and easily understood for the topic Global Challenges in Prelimination Geography.

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Adventures in Population Growth | Laird Research

Adventures in Population Growth | Laird Research | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
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This is a great interactive site showing changes in population and the population pyramid for a selectionof countries over 35 year period. It demonstrates well the changing structure of populations and the overall change to teh size of the popluation.

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See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas

See How Humans Have Reshaped the Globe With This Interactive Atlas | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it

"

Earth is changing rapidly, and an increasing number of scientists say that humans have become the dominant force driving these changes. While the term has no formal definition, many agree that we are now living in an age shaped by human activity: the Anthropocene.

Evidence for the Anthropocene ranges from worldwide population booms to the expansive transformation of the landscape. But solutions are cropping up at the local level that could help create a more resilient global community." 

 

Tags: ESRI, anthropocene, environment depend, sustainability. 


Via Seth Dixon
Sally Egan's insight:

A great intereactive showing impacts of people on the global environments. Great for Global challenges and also for Ecosystems at Risk topic in Stage 6 Geography.

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Olga Boldina's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:25 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Truthbehere2's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:01 AM

Well duh...we are very greedy leeches that don't want to take the time to restore and repair what we take and destroy...

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, December 8, 2014 10:58 AM

Excellent use of an Esri Storymap to outline how humans have changed Earth over time.

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An Interactive Infographic Showing the Global Migration of People ...

An Interactive Infographic Showing the Global Migration of People ... | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
“The Global Flow of People” is a fascinating interactive infographic that visualizes human migration between world regions from 1990 to 2010. The visualization can be viewed in five year increments, which gives a sense of ...
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An interactive infographic which allows the reader to explore new estimates of migration flows between and within regions for five-year periods, 1990 to 2010. By clicking on a region of the World it is possible to discover flows country-by-country.

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Record Number of Internally Displaced Persons

Record Number of Internally Displaced Persons | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
WORLD A record 33.3 million people around the world had been internally displaced by conflict at the end of 2013—that's 4.5 million more than 2012, an international report said this week. (Reuters)...
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This article provides map and discussion ideas relating to IDPs, reasons for displacement and areas of displacement. Very usefl for Global Challenges Population tooic on movements of the World's people.

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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The Best News You Don’t Know

The Best News You Don’t Know | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it

I’ve covered massacres in South Sudan, concentration camps in Myanmar and widespread stunting in India, but it’s also important to acknowledge the backdrop of global progress. Otherwise, the public may perceive poverty as hopeless and see no point in carrying on the fight — at just the point when we’re making the most rapid gains ever recorded.


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This article provides a positive look at the advances made in global development measures.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 3:37 PM

The world is winning the war on extreme poverty, but most Americans think that poverty is getting worse. Doom and gloom can dominate media coverage because a horrific tragedy gets better rating than slow incremental improvements.  The general public is often ignorant of the measurable improvements going on in the world today.  No, the world isn’t perfect, but it is getting better. 

 

Tags: mediapoverty, development, economic, perspective.

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The Sydney suburb that will dwarf London's squeeze

The Sydney suburb that will dwarf London's squeeze | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
Apartment density of the scale seen only in pockets of New York and Hong Kong is being planned for Sydney.
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A great article looking at the issue of urban consolidation within Sydney as a result of the planned development of Waterloo and development of a new series of train stations to enhance inner city living. Relevant to Sydney as a case study of a large city in the developed world or a study of an urban dynamic operating within a suburb.


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Are Vertical Farms the Future of Agriculture? | Geography | tutor2u

Are Vertical Farms the Future of Agriculture? | Geography | tutor2u | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
Let your students watch this engaging 10 minute video on Vertical Farms and see how they respond.
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A great short (10 minute) video on vertical farms for increasing food production. Matches with Sustainable biomes topic.

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The push-pull factors of migration | Geography | tutor2u

The push-pull factors of migration | Geography | tutor2u | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
There are many economic, social and physical reasons why people emigrate and they can usually be classified into push and pull factors.
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A great summary of reasons for migration. Global challenges - population movements topic.
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Emma's curator insight, June 13, 10:29 PM

Great summary of the push and pull factors of migration.

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Hans Rosling on why most of the world is better off than you think - YouTube

Hans Rosling explains why despite global inequalities, most of the world is better off than you think - and better off than it has ever been before. Subscrib...
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Overpopulation, overconsumption – in pictures

Overpopulation, overconsumption – in pictures | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people

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Global challenges

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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth

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The recent overturning of China's one child policy is reviewed in this article with a summary of lessons learnt and how this could be applied in the US.

 

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:00 PM

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

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China Drops One-Child Cap After Three Decades to Lift Growth

China Drops One-Child Cap After Three Decades to Lift Growth | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
China’s ruling Communist Party will abandon the one-child policy introduced in the late 1970s to defuse a demographic time bomb that threatens to choke growth in the world’s second biggest economy.

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Great account of teh changed of china's population policy.

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Why Do Rivers Curve?


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A very siual form using simple language to explain the meandering of rivers. Applicable to the course work on Hydrosphere.

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YEC Geo's curator insight, December 7, 2014 8:15 PM

Actually a very good video.  My one quibble is with the introduction, when the narrator talks about mountain streams "carving" their gorges.  The puzzle of how small streams could possibly carve out deep bedrock canyons is an ongoing research problem, and is difficult to resolve from a gradualistic perspective.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:07 AM

Australian curriculum


The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform (ACHGK050)


GeoWorld

Chapter 1: Distinctive landform features

Chapter 3: Restless Earth: geomorphic processes 

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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
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An outstanding videao explaining the population oyramid and how and why the world's population pyramid is changing fro the traditional pyramid to a block or column shaped graph.

 

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Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:47 AM

unit 2

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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INFOGRAPHIC: War in Syria: Where do the refugees go? - EurActiv

INFOGRAPHIC: War in Syria: Where do the refugees go? - EurActiv | DSODE Preliminary Geography Global Challenges | Scoop.it
EurActiv
INFOGRAPHIC: War in Syria: Where do the refugees go?
EurActiv
Only 2.5 to 3 million Syrians have fled the country, residing mostly in refugee camps in the neighbouring countries of Lebanon, Turkey, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt.
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The Syrian crisis has caused the exile of millions of citizens. This infographic explains the destinations of theses refugees. This is a contemporary example fitting the course topic populaiton movements.

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future

"Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples."


Via Seth Dixon
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Well presented explanation of population pyramids and the important data they contain. outlines the shape and how this changes during demographic and econmomic transition, factors that cause change and how population data is used to predict futre and reflects the past social events of a country. Examples of different nations are provided.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 26, 2014 4:04 PM

Population unit

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 1:51 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This video was about how demographers categorize data and analyze it. This video showed a few different population pyramids in order to show differences in population in different countries. It showed China as an example and pointed out the remnants of the one child policy 35 years before and how the number of men were higher due to sex selective abortions. They also talked about how the population pyramids could show what stage in the demographic transition model a country was in and how they use them to predict future patterns and changes. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it covers topics such as population change, demographic transition models, sex composition, population policies and much more. Population pyramids are very useful due to the visualization of sex, age and number composition in a countries population. They are very important in the use of predicting the future change in population because it can tell what the population has gone through in the past and what to expect in the DTM. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:43 PM

This video illustrates how population pyramids have the ability to show how populations will rise and fall over time. Pyramids specifically show the population based on a specific age, and illustrates a country's amount of young people in comparison to the elderly.