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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon, gina lockton
Sally Egan's insight:

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 10:35 PM

This article was great in that it left me with some great visuals and details on each of the models. For me, it's hard to remember each one of the models but this article really allowed me to compare each one and read about each one all in one place. The layout of the article was also nice and I think that it was just a great overall reminder of the models.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 11:56 PM

This article teaches you mainly about the Burgess and Hoyt Model. It compares the two, and it gives you detailed information on lots of the urbanization terms.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about how geographers drew up cities and made models of how cities were drawn up. It teaches you how they thought back then, and how urbanization has evolved from then to now.

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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

Via Seth Dixon
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Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 10, 10:23 AM

This article shows the difference between extremely urbanized areas and relatively urbanized areas. Florence and Atlanta are compared. Florence has narrow streets with sharp intersections, which causes cars to drive slowly. This is safer for pedestrians. In Atlanta, the roads are wider and curves are less sharp. The most this will do is help people in Atlanta get tp their jobs slightly faster. Miami and a seaside town are also compared. The interstate in Miami takes up most of the room and there is few real estate options. In the seaside town, options are not limited, around 80% available for use. The less urbanized places are more efficient. 

 

-A.L.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

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The death of Kings Cross as we know it

The death of Kings Cross as we know it | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
There is big change underway in Sydney's Golden Mile. All the way down the strip in Sydney's Kings Cross, shops that once housed liquor, fast food, sex and convenience have been plastered with For Lease signs.
Sally Egan's insight:

Great article, with video on the SMH site, relating to the changing economic and residential functions within the Kings Cross Darlinghurst area of Sydney. Great contemporary data is presented for teh case study of Sydney as a large city in the developed world.

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Are Indian cities getting too big to manage?

Are Indian cities getting too big to manage? | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it

Managing cities is one of the world’s greatest challenges. Cities are increasingly driving countries’ economies, and more and more people are migrating to them.


Via Felicity Southwell
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Interesting and relevant to responses to challenges in mega cities of the developing world.

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
Sally Egan's insight:

A different perspective on challenges for mega cities.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

Via Seth Dixon
Sally Egan's insight:

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

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Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, June 26, 2014 5:25 PM

Just a few years ago there were only  20 cities with a pop over 10 million.  I'll use this with my  10 geography class to compare Australia's population and size with these cities and  look at debates around policies.  I,ll try and get the students to debate around ecological sustainability.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Population projections for Sydney deliver urban planning wake-up call

Population projections for Sydney deliver urban planning wake-up call | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Sydney will need more than 600,000 extra homes for an additional 1.6 million people in the next two decades, according to state government figures.
Sally Egan's insight:

Great relevance to case study of Sydney and the changing character of the city and the urban dynamics occuring within Sydney. 

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Mumbai’s population growth rate is twice that of the state

Mumbai’s population growth rate is twice that of the state | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Census figures point out that over 50 per cent of migration into the state was due to the availability of employment and business opportunitie at large.
Sally Egan's insight:

Detailed account of teh population growth of Mumbai. Applicable to study of Mega Cities.

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Reshaping the West: Sydney's growing challenge

Reshaping the West: Sydney's growing challenge | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
A land of opportunity awaits if policymakers rethink western Sydney's jobs, childcare, transport and planning needs.
Sally Egan's insight:

Provides an account of the changes occuring in western sydney adn factors that have brought about these changes. Applicable to case study of Sydney as a large city in developed world.

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New Sydney CBD 40km/h speed limit put to the test - Sydney Morning Herald

The Motor Report
New Sydney CBD 40km/h speed limit put to the test
Sydney Morning Herald
Debate is continuing on how effective a new 40km/h speed limit in Sydney's CBD will be in reducing the number of pedestrians killed on Sydney's roads.
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Adeevee - Banamex/CDC: Houses, Gardens, Buildings, Development

Adeevee - Banamex/CDC: Houses, Gardens, Buildings, Development | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Sally Egan's insight:

Great images of the contrast of housing between the rich and poor in Mexico City. These images formed part of an advertising campaign drawing attention to this gap within the city. Good examples of spatial exclusion for urban dynamics.

 

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Mumbai: Bright lights, tight city

Mumbai: Bright lights, tight city | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
In Mumbai, one of the world's fastest-growing cities, up to a million people can be crammed into one square kilometre. Amrit Dhillon reports on a megacity collapsing under its own weight.

Via dilaycock
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dilaycock's curator insight, February 20, 2014 5:52 PM

Stark description of the issues facing a large portion of Mumbai's 13 million inhabitants.

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RE.WORK Cities says urban innovation is key to sustainable future ...

RE.WORK Cities says urban innovation is key to sustainable future ... | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
With the future lying in the world's cities, policy-makers, developers and designers are focusing on innovations for the urban landscape.
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Urbanization to focus on smaller cities - Global Times

Urbanization to focus on smaller cities - Global Times | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Xinhua
Urbanization to focus on smaller cities
Global Times
China is to inject more resources into the development of small and mid-level cities, while at the same time, seeking to control the population of the nation's megacities.
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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.


Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
Sally Egan's insight:
Relevant tothe challenges of mega cities in the developing world.
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 10:16 AM

This shows just how important water is the human race. It also shows how humans have no sense of urgency in conserving water until it's too late. The saying "you never know a good thing until it's gone" applies in this case. The Brazilian government did not take any sufficient measures to conserve water until it realized how depleted the reservoir is. This event demonstrates the environmental impact of  water depletion on humans, and how humans have such a huge impact on the geographical landscape on Earth. As seen in the picture above, many greens turned yellow as a result of the lowering water levels. The river beds are soon going to be overgrown by shrubbery as water no longer exists there. These are all results of a combination of natural (lack of rain) and human causes of resource depletion.

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smh.com.au - The Sydney Morning Herald

"New Centre of wealth emerges"

Sally Egan's insight:

"New Centre of wealth emerges" identifies the economic growth of the Macquarie Park and North Ryde area of Sydney. This article is a great insight into the changing econmomic character of Sydney.

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Elderly to be forced out of Millers Point as cheap rent deal comes to an end

Elderly to be forced out of Millers Point as cheap rent deal comes to an end | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Non-profit community groups are being forced to pay hundreds of dollars a week in rent, throwing their viability into doubt, as the NSW government abandons "peppercorn rent" agreements that have been in place for decades.

Via Louise Woods
Sally Egan's insight:

This article is relevant to the issue of residential areas of Sydney and accesss to housing, appropriate to the case study of Sydney as a large city in the developed world.

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Megacities' explosive growth poses epic challenges

Megacities' explosive growth poses epic challenges | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
A historic migration is under way as the world's booming population moves to cities in search of opportunity. The trend should change society by 2039.
Sally Egan's insight:

This article outlines the challenges that the rapid and often unplanned growth of megacities creates. Contains an interactive map showing megacity populations in 2030. a good overview article for challenges and responses in meagacities.

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Tracking Detroit's Decay Through Google Street View

Though it's easy to crack jokes about Detroit's downfall from afar, it doesn't change the fact that there are very real people forced to look on as the place they call home slowly descends into decay. One of the most poignant depictions of this has come from none other than Google Maps.
Sally Egan's insight:

Great use of Google Street View images showing teh urban decay in Detroit over a short period of time 2009-2014.

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12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.
Sally Egan's insight:

This set of 12 graphics all show a particular facet on the topic of global poverty, including life expectanceyand income, access to energy, literecy rates, national population growth rates and forecasts of growth, birth rates and mortality statistics. This compilation is definitely helpful in unsderstanding the topic Global challenges.  In the graphic above, the connection between low female literacy rates and poverty is demonstrated quite powerfully.   

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Sydney Olympic Park: how the west was won

Sydney Olympic Park: how the west was won | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Sydney Olympic Park is playing an increasingly important role in the state economy nearly a decade-and-a-half after being at the centre of the world's biggest sporting event.
Sally Egan's insight:

Sydney as a case study of a large city in teh developed world. This article provides an insight into the decentalisation of employment to the Sydney Olympic Park sight. 

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Infrastructure & Cities - Sustainable Cities - Siemens

Infrastructure & Cities - Sustainable Cities - Siemens | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
5 of the World’s Most Successful Urban #Infrastructure Projects - #Delhi Metro. Read more: http://t.co/P6mdwmTdzr http://t.co/avpgB8K3kC
Sally Egan's insight:

Provides an overview and then 5 infrastructure projects from 5 cities  illustrate the application of technology to address issues of the urban places including Delhi. Infographic is a simple summary of technology in the 5 cities.

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Our Urban Future in Film

Our Urban Future in Film | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
By Ryan Schleeter, National Geographic More than 50% of the world’s population already lives in cities, and this number is expected to grow to a whopping 70% by 2050. More and more people move to t...
Sally Egan's insight:

A great account of the way urban places are shown in film, from early movies to recent and even futuristic cities. This is a good read about the growing world population and the increasing urbanisation of where people live.

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Sydney's global economic corridor

Sydney's global economic corridor | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
A proliferation of knowledge based firms clustered in Sydney's inner suburbs present an uplifting counter-narrative to Australia's recent manufacturing gloom. Matt Wade and Sophia Phan report.

Via gina lockton
Sally Egan's insight:

Great relevance to Sydney case study and changing economic character of the city.

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gina lockton's curator insight, March 9, 2014 7:21 PM

an interesting snippet for Urban Geography

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


Via Seth Dixon
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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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Demographer predicts big changes for the West's housing landscape - Glenwood Springs Post Independent

Demographer predicts big changes for the West's housing landscape - Glenwood Springs Post Independent | DSODE HSC Geog Urban Places | Scoop.it
Demographer predicts big changes for the West's housing landscape
Glenwood Springs Post Independent
A native Oregonian, he spent over 20 years teaching urban planning, public policy and urban finance at colleges in the South.
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