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Boom in e-cigarette sales divides smoking campaigners - The Guardian

Boom in e-cigarette sales divides smoking campaigners - The Guardian | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Boom in e-cigarette sales divides smoking campaigners
The Guardian
This month, British American Tobacco ran its first advert on television in years – for a brand of e-cigarette made by a subsidiary company.
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Teen girls' brains hit harder by booze.

This article shows that because of how teenage girls are built and the faster development of the brain, that they are more vunerable to the effects of alcohol than teenage boys. This conveys a warning to teenage girls that they have to be more aware of how much they drink.


Via Stephanie McEwan
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Stephanie McEwan's comment, April 23, 2012 10:14 PM
This article shows that because of how teenage girls are built and the faster development of the brain, that they are more vunerable to the effects of alcohol than teenage boys. This conveys a warning to teenage girls that they have to be more aware of how much they drink.
Alex Lavalle's curator insight, April 26, 2013 4:20 AM

Teenagers girls' brains develop two years faster than males this article says. This means drinking for girls can have a longer lasting effect than boys.

Girls should be aware of how much they drink as too much drinking may lead to unwanted pregnancy and boys taking advantage of girls. Girls should watch what they drink and how much they drink. We have covered most of this in class.

stephanie shalala's curator insight, May 19, 2013 1:01 AM

This article tells us that teenage girls are more vunerable to the effects of alcohol than teenage boys. The reasons for this is because 

girls brains develop one to two years earlier than males So, alcohol use during a different developmental stage (despite the same age)  could account for the gender differences.

Other reasons include hormonal differences between girls and boys, and girls' slower rates of metabolism, higher body fat ratios, and lower body weight.

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Candy Flavored Methamphetamine, The New Trend to get kids ...

Candy Flavored Methamphetamine, The New Trend to get kids ... | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
By Donna Leinwand, USA TODAY Reports of candy-flavored methamphetamine are emerging around the nation, stirring concern among police and abuse prevention experts that drug dealers are marketing the drug to ...

Via REAL Prevention
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Study Drugs: Most Parents Unaware When Teens Take Stimulants Without ... - Huffington Post

Study Drugs: Most Parents Unaware When Teens Take Stimulants Without ... - Huffington Post | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
RedOrbit
Study Drugs: Most Parents Unaware When Teens Take Stimulants Without ...
Huffington Post
That is much lower than the percentage of teens that surveys suggest are using the drugs.
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Rescooped by Michelle Miller-Day from Alcohol & other drug issues in the media
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EU's alcohol strategy needs further push, MEPs say

EU's alcohol strategy needs further push, MEPs say | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
Europeans are the heaviest drinkers in the world and in some EU member
states, such as Luxembourg and the Czech Republic, the alcohol consumption is
2.5 times more than what an average person in the world drinks.

Via ReGenUC
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Rising Trend: Sniffing Gasoline | Huffing & Inhalants | Addiction ...

Rising Trend: Sniffing Gasoline | Huffing & Inhalants | Addiction ... | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
Teens and Pre-teens are experimenting with inhalants, the latest is huffing Gasoline. The dangers of this trend include: organ damage, cancer and SSDS.

Via National Inhalants Information Service
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Rescooped by Michelle Miller-Day from Teenage alcohol use
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No safe level of alcohol for teens

No safe level of alcohol for teens | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it

This article shows that teenagers who even drink small amounts of alchoal have a significantly higher risk or developing alcohol abuse or risky sexual behaviour. It show that there is no safe drrinking level for people under the age of 18.


Via Stephanie McEwan
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Stephanie McEwan's comment, April 23, 2012 10:14 PM
This article shows that teenagers who even drink small amounts of alchoal have a significantly higher risk or developing alcohol abuse or risky sexual behaviour. It show that there is no safe drrinking level for people under the age of 18.
Alex Lavalle's curator insight, April 26, 2013 4:38 AM

In this article it shows that if your underage drinking there is no safe level until the age of 18. Teenagers who drink are most likely to develop developing alcohol abuse or risky sexual behaviour than those who wait. A lot of research has been taken shows that waiting until your 18 to drink is the best option for everyone. We havent really discussed this issue so it was good to read the article and to wait until the age of 18.

Perin Leach's curator insight, May 20, 2013 7:22 AM
This article was extremelly insightfull as is explains that teenagers who even drink small amounts of alcohol have the same risks (mentally/sexually/physically) at those who drink alot if you are under the age of 18. People under the age of 18 who are drinking are most likely to develope certain types of brain malfunctions/disorders caused by the alcohol/drugs being consumed. I think this article is extremelly relevent even though we haven't discussed this in class because it just good to know in gerneral.  
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Underage drinking rates 'alarming'

Underage drinking rates 'alarming' | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
Underage drinking rates 'alarming'...

Via Stephanie McEwan
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Alex Lavalle's curator insight, April 26, 2013 4:02 AM

In this article it gives statics and talks about teenage alcohol use. Although this article is not recent it shows how much money was spent and how much each age group drank. This articles makes you realise if that many teenagers were drinking back then, what are the rates for 2013?

dylan lees's curator insight, May 20, 2013 6:10 AM

This shows that the age of underage drinking is getting lower and lower by the year kids trying to be to inpress there friends or by peer pressure when there are 12.

breedennis's curator insight, June 1, 2013 9:32 AM

Although this article is a couple of years old, it clearly shows the alarming rates of young adults who are drinking and the effects that this has on a young person. This refers to what we were talking about in class about safe drinking and underage drinking.

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Study shows college women binge drink more alcohol than men - Metro.us

Study shows college women binge drink more alcohol than men - Metro.us | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
Metro.us
Study shows college women binge drink more alcohol than men
Metro.us
“Weekly cut-offs are recommended to prevent long-term harmful effects due to alcohol, such as liver disease and breast cancer.
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“Tobacco smoking leads to low sperm count, weak erection”

“Tobacco smoking leads to low sperm count, weak erection” | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
Dr Joseph Natsah of General Hospital Kachia in Kaduna State, has advised youths against tobacco smoking, saying it leads to impotence. (Good reason to #quitsmoking!
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Most Parents Unaware of Teens' Use of Study Drugs | Psych Central ...

Most Parents Unaware of Teens' Use of Study Drugs | Psych Central ... | REAL Prevention | Scoop.it
As students prepare for final exams, some will turn to a prescription amphetamine or other stimulant to gain an academic edge. Yet a new University of.
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