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Rescooped by Lori Feldman from I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
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How Social Media Can Elevate Your Marketing Automation

How Social Media Can Elevate Your Marketing Automation | Drip Marketing | Scoop.it
Over the past two or three years, full-power marketing automation has finally become available to businesses of all sizes.

Via Riaz Khan
Lori Feldman's insight:

Even without social media, marketing automation is the newest market differentiator between you and another organization who's not using it.

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What a Messy Desk Says About You

What a Messy Desk Says About You | Drip Marketing | Scoop.it
It can be a good idea to clean up your desk. But not if you’re looking to be creative.
Lori Feldman's insight:

At times when I've "cleaned my desk" (or hired Cathy Sexton to "get me organized,"), I've relaxed in an ahhh state for, oh, about a week. Then the overwhelming urge to de-stack and spread out comes over me again.

 

Finally, the  University of Minnesota validated my fundamental belief that chaos and mess do drive natural creativity. Its research study found "virtue in disarray" and "disordered offices encourage originality." 

 

Which is great for my line of work. Developing unique and responsive marketing content for website landing pages, blog articles, social media, email or drip marketing campaigns requires explaining your unique expertise in ways no one else can easily mimick. So when you need to think outside the box, let the clutter begin! 

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New CEO getting a read on Nutrisystem

New CEO getting a read on Nutrisystem | Drip Marketing | Scoop.it
For its new chief executive, the board of the weight-loss company Nutrisystem Inc. picked a veteran of the publishing industry. On the face of it, helping people diet would seem to have little in...
Lori Feldman's insight:

What does a diet company resolve for its new year? For Nutrasystem's new CEO, it's better data mining of the 8 million, mostly female, "underleveraged" names in their customer database. Company profits have been getting skinnier since 2007, so stakeholders are ready to feast on something lean and mean. Dawn Zier: You go, girl! And don't forget to add drip marketing to your mix. Not everyone starts their diet in January!

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Was your daughter killed in a car crash? Database marketers want to know

Was your daughter killed in a car crash? Database marketers want to know | Drip Marketing | Scoop.it
You never know when you might be able to profit from someone else's tragedy, after all.
Lori Feldman's insight:

In the early 80s, before massive "Do Not Mail" legislation took effect, I was often asked in my job as a list broker for lists of widows and divorcees. Financial companies wanted these names to market their "rollover" services.

 

Death information was compiled from the USPS's "deceased database" which was, essentially, a change-of-address form completed by the widow on behalf of her deceased husband. "Divorce status" was typically compiled from white pages listings that changed from "John and Mary Smith" to just "Mary Smith" the following year.

 

Unfortunately, many widows and divorcees didn't know about or want to change their status publicly with the USPS or telecoms. So the lists I brokered were never 100% accurate (which I always explained to my customer).

 

There's nothing like handling a customer service call from a distraught widow or a steaming mad ex-wife--unless it's a broken-hearted call from the relative of a tragically killed family member.

 

In the OfficeMax story, however, this is a case of bad database management. What probably happened is that a customer service rep was told "update the customer's information after every phone call," but wasn't told where to put "custom" info that didn't fit into a defined data field.

 

I see that a lot with databases we help clean up where extra address lines are used for notes (like the above "daughter killed in car crash"), first name fields contain the first name and half of a hyphened last name or a title is populated with emotional entries like "Asshole."

 

You can blame some angry customer reactions on Big Data and the lack of privacy in today's society. But if you own a customer database, it's your responsibility to manage what you create--and train your staff to be accountable for the data their collecting.

 

Here are 5 ways to be a more responsible database marketer:

 

1. Track the "create date" and a "last updated date" on every entry. Make it your database manager's job to quarantine new entries for validation before they're emailed. Quarantine all entries older than 12 months until they can be updated via survey update form or phone call. 

 

2.  Identify customers and prospects separately. Customer data must be bullet-proof accurate.

 

3.  Identify the data source. How did that contact get into your database? You may find you have a breech in a data source (a bad web form or bad referral partner, for example) that may be damaging your online reputation.

 

4. Self-reported data is the best kind of customer information--but only when it's reliable. Check your web forms to be sure you don't have any "Donald Duck" or X-rated entries contaminating your database.

 

5. Give customers an easy way to update your misinformation about them, both on your website and in any email communications. Customers will appreciate it and you'll continue to be a welcomed solution provider in their time-challenged attention span.

 

It's true we all have less privacy than ever before. So as database marketers we have an enormous responsibility  to our customers and prospects not to transmit emotional pain and inaccurate crap into the world.

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Diana Nyad: Never, ever give up | Video on TED.com

In the pitch-black night, stung by jellyfish, choking on salt water, singing to herself, hallucinating … Diana Nyad just kept on swimming.
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A plea for brevity

A plea for brevity | Drip Marketing | Scoop.it
My editors at BtoB grant me 450 words for this column, and I love them for it. The length limit requires me to focus, get to the point and finish quickly. It demands the discipline to make each word count.
Lori Feldman's insight:

Mark Twain was one of the first to observe, ”I didn’t have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.” Here's an opinion from one of my favorite B2B columnists on whether you should write long or short copy (or as we call it today, "content.")

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