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Dramatic.Philosophy
philosophy; in schools;with children;and drama;and feminism; and humour;and happiness;and marketing philosophical practice
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The psychological importance of wasting time

The psychological importance of wasting time | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
There will always be an endless list of chores to complete and work to do, and a culture of relentless productivity tells us to get to it right away and feel terribly guilty about any time wasted. But the truth is, a life spent dutifully responding to emails is a dull one indeed. And “wasted” time is, in fact, highly fulfilling and necessary.

Don’t believe me? Take it from the creator of “Inbox Zero.” As Oliver Burkeman reports in The Guardian, Merlin Mann was commissioned to write a book about his streamlined email system. Two years later, he abandoned the project and instead posted a (since deleted) blog post on how he’d spent so long focusing on how to spend time well, he’d ended up missing valuable moments with his daughter.

The problem comes when we spend so long frantically chasing productivity, we refuse to take real breaks. We put off sleeping in, or going for a long walk, or reading by the window—and, even if we do manage time away from the grind, it comes with a looming awareness of the things we should be doing, and so the experience is weighed down by guilt.

Instead, there’s a tendency to turn to the least fulfilling tendency of them all: Sitting at our desk, in front of our computer, browsing websites and contributing to neither our happiness nor our productivity.

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The 50 Most Influential Living Philosophers | The Best Schools

The 50 Most Influential Living Philosophers | The Best Schools | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Here are the 50 most influential living philosophers, actively changing our understanding of ourselves and our world. Philosophy is far from dead!

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Why Foucault's work on power is more important than ever – Colin Koopman | Aeon Essays

Why Foucault's work on power is more important than ever – Colin Koopman | Aeon Essays | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Imagine you are asked to compose an ultra-short history of philosophy. Perhaps you’ve been challenged to squeeze the impossibly sprawling diversity of philosophy itself into just a few tweets. You could do worse than to search for the single word that best captures the ideas of every important philosopher. Plato had his ‘forms’. René Descartes had his ‘mind’ and John Locke his ‘ideas’. John Stuart Mill later had his ‘liberty’. In more recent philosophy, Jacques Derrida’s word was ‘text’, John Rawls’s was ‘justice’, and Judith Butler’s remains ‘gender’. Michel Foucault’s word, according to this innocent little parlour game, would certainly be ‘power’.

Foucault remains one of the most cited 20th-century thinkers and is, according to some lists, the single most cited figure across the humanities and social sciences. His two most referenced works, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (1975) and The History of Sexuality, Volume One (1976), are the central sources for his analyses of power. Interestingly enough, however, Foucault was not always known for his signature word. He first gained his massive influence in 1966 with the publication of The Order of Things. The original French title gives a better sense of the intellectual milieu in which it was written: Les mots et les choses, or ‘Words and Things’. Philosophy in the 1960s was all about words, especially among Foucault’s contemporaries.

In other parts of Paris, Derrida was busily asserting that ‘there is nothing outside the text’, and Jacques Lacan turned psychoanalysis into linguistics by claiming that ‘the unconscious is structured like a language’. This was not just a French fashion. In 1967 Richard Rorty, surely the most infamous American philosopher of his generation, summed up the new spirit in the title of his anthology of essays, The Linguistic Turn. That same year, Jürgen Habermas, soon to become Germany’s leading philosopher, published his attempt at ‘grounding the social sciences in a theory of language’.

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Seneca on Letting the Eminent Dead Guide You

Seneca on Letting the Eminent Dead Guide You | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Cherish some man of high character, and keep him ever before your eyes, living as if he were watching you, and ordering all your actions as if he beheld them.” Such, my dear Lucilius, is the counsel of Epicurus; he has quite properly given us a guardian and an attendant. We can get rid of most sins, if we have a witness who stands near us when we are likely to go wrong. The soul should have someone whom it can respect, – one by whose authority it may make even its inner shrine more hallowed. Happy is the man who can make others better, not merely when he is in their company, but even when he is in their thoughts! And happy also is he who can so revere a man as to calm and regulate himself by calling him to mind! One who can so revere another, will soon be himself worthy of reverence.

Choose therefore a Cato; or, if Cato seems too severe a model, choose some Laelius, a gentler spirit. Choose a master whose life, conversation, and soul-expressing face have satisfied you; picture him always to yourself as your protector or your pattern. For we must indeed have someone according to whom we may regulate our characters; you can never straighten that which is crooked unless you use a ruler.

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Rafeeq Hasan discusses Rousseau on freedom and happiness (Podcast)

Rafeeq Hasan discusses Rousseau on freedom and happiness (Podcast) | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it

In political discussions, we assume that there are two ways a person can lean. Either personal freedom and property, or harmonizing your needs with the needs of others in your community. We think of these two ideals as mutually exclusive.  Of course it’s impossible to lean both ways!

 

Jean-Jacques Rousseau was famous for leaning in the former direction. He thought that a just, well-ordered society should be one that maximizes the potential of each of its citizens to be free from interference from others. If everything is set up the way it should be, you should just be able to go about your own business. But in our discussion, Rafeeq Hasan argues that this interpretation of Rousseau, though not entirely incorrect, is missing half of the story...

 

Source : lucian.uchicago.edu


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Noam Chomsky and Michel Gondry, together at last

Noam Chomsky and Michel Gondry, together at last | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it

Eternal Sunshine director plus star lefty philosopher equals the weirdest animated film ever.

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Bertrand Russell and the case for 'Philosophy for Everyone'

Bertrand Russell and the case for 'Philosophy for Everyone' | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
One of the interesting questions we face as philosophers who are attempting to make philosophical ideas accessible for a general audience, is whether or not everyone can or should ‘do philosophy’.

Some philosophers wish to leave philosophy in the academy or university setting. Whereas others claim the downfall of modern philosophy came in the late 19th century when the subject was institutionalized within the research university setting. By condemning philosophy as only appropriate as a serious subject of study, philosophers have lost much widespread support and public recognition for its value.

Philosophers working in the public arena, such as those contributing to The Conversation and Cogito Philosophy Blog will defend the argument in favour of ‘philosophy for everyone’.
Bertrand Russell’s ‘Philosophy for Laymen’

In 1946 Bertrand Russell wrote an essay entitled Philosophy for Laymen, in which he defends the view that philosophy should be ‘a part of general education’. He proposes that,

even in the time that can easily be spared without injury to the learning of technical skills, philosophy can give certain things that will greatly increase the student’s value as a human being and as a citizen.

Clare Carlisle refers to Russell when she writes,

Russell revives an ancient conception of philosophy as a way of life in insisting that questions of cosmic meaning and value have an existential, ethical and spiritual urgency. (Of course, what we might mean by such terms is another issue for philosophers to grapple with.)

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How to Create Quality Facebook Canvas Ads : Social Media Examiner

How to Create Quality Facebook Canvas Ads : Social Media Examiner | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Do you want to reach more mobile Facebook users? Discover how to create quality Facebook Canvas ads.

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David Blundell's curator insight, May 13, 2016 4:08 AM
So what exactly is Facebook Canvas and do I need it, you might very well be asking yourself. Well if your social marketing focus is on mobile ads and video/images I believe you should read this post toot suite . . .
Sven Hirschmann's curator insight, May 15, 2016 9:13 AM
Sehr interessante neue Werbeform, die auch hohe Kosten für Landingpages sparen kann und dadurch mehr Budget für aktiven Kundendialog schafft.
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You Will Be Immediately Impacted by Twitter’s Revamped 140-Character Limit via Simply Measured

You Will Be Immediately Impacted by Twitter’s Revamped 140-Character Limit via Simply Measured | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
It's official: Twitter is stretching it's 140-character limit by no longer attributing photos, videos, GIFs, and polls to a Tweet's total. Source:

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David Blundell's curator insight, May 25, 2016 3:47 AM
All I can say is About Blimmin' Time! Good move Twitter . . .
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How to Use Facebook Messenger for Business : Social Media Examiner

How to Use Facebook Messenger for Business : Social Media Examiner | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Do your customers use Facebook Messenger? Discover how to connect and engage with customers using Facebook Messenger.

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David Blundell's curator insight, May 9, 2016 1:28 PM
Everything's going mobile and Facebook Messanger has great potential for direct marketing with customers. Here's the skinny from the excellent @KristiHines . . .
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How to Create Quality Facebook Canvas Ads : Social Media Examiner

How to Create Quality Facebook Canvas Ads : Social Media Examiner | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Do you want to reach more mobile Facebook users? Discover how to create quality Facebook Canvas ads.

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David Blundell's curator insight, May 13, 2016 4:08 AM
So what exactly is Facebook Canvas and do I need it, you might very well be asking yourself. Well if your social marketing focus is on mobile ads and video/images I believe you should read this post toot suite . . .
Sven Hirschmann's curator insight, May 15, 2016 9:13 AM
Sehr interessante neue Werbeform, die auch hohe Kosten für Landingpages sparen kann und dadurch mehr Budget für aktiven Kundendialog schafft.
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Teaching how to think is just as important as teaching anything else

Teaching how to think is just as important as teaching anything else | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
A new paper on teaching critical thinking skills in science has pointed out, yet again, the value of giving students experiences that go beyond simple recall or learned procedures.

It is a common lamentation that students are not taught to think, but there is usually an accompanying lack of clarity about exactly what that might mean.

There is a way of understanding this idea that is conceptually easy and delivers a sharp educational focus – a way that focuses on the explicit teaching of thinking skills through an inquiry process, and allows students to effectively evaluate their thinking.
What are thinking skills?

Let’s first understand what we might mean by thinking skills. Thinking skills, or cognitive skills, are, in large part, things you do with knowledge. Things like analysing, evaluating, synthesising, inferring, conjecturing, justifying, categorising and many other terms describe your cognitive events at a particular functional level.

Analysis, for example, involves identifying the constituent elements of something and examining their relationships with each other and to the whole. One can analyse a painting, a piece of text, a set of data or a graph.

Analysis is a widely valued cognitive skill and is not unique to any discipline context. It is a general thinking skill.

Most syllabuses from primary to tertiary level are organised by content only, with little mention of such cognitive skills. Usually, even if they are mentioned, little is said about how to teach them. The hope is they will be caught, not taught.

Rigour in course design is too often understood as equating to large amounts of recall of content and specific training in algorithms or set procedures. It is far less common, but far more valuable, to have courses in which rigour is found in the demand for high-level cognitive skill formation.

This is not to say that knowledge is not important in the curriculum. Our knowledge is hard won; we should value what we have learned for how it makes our lives more productive or meaningful.

But there is nothing mutually exclusive about developing high levels of cognitive skills with content knowledge in a discipline context. It just demands attention to these skills, using the content as an opportunity to explore them.

It is knowing how to provide students with these skill-building opportunities in context that is the mark of an outstanding teacher of effective thinking.

After all, we do not expect the scientific, cultural and political leaders of tomorrow simply to know stuff. They must also know what to do with it.

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The Philosophy of Creativity

The Philosophy of Creativity | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
This collection of new essays on creativity integrates philosophical insights with empirical research.
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Would you ditch your therapist for a “philosophical counselor”?

Would you ditch your therapist for a “philosophical counselor”? | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Instead of going to traditional psychotherapists for advice and support, growing numbers of people are turning to philosophical counselors for particularly wise guidance. These counselors work much like traditional psychotherapists. But instead of offering solutions based solely on their understanding of mental health or psychology, philosophical counselors offer solutions and guidance drawn from the writings of great thinkers.

Millennia of philosophical studies can provide practical advice for those experiencing practical difficulties: There’s an entire field of philosophy that explores moral issues; stoic philosophers show us how to weather hardship; the existentialists advise on anxiety; and Aristotle was one of the first thinkers to question what makes a “good life.” All these topics make up a good chunk of any therapy session, philosophical or otherwise.

Philosophical counseling has been available since the early 1990s, when Elliot Cohen came up with the idea and founded the National Philosophical Counseling Association (NPCA) with around 20 counselors. The NPCA’s website suggests writer’s block, job loss, procrastination, and rejection are all appropriate subjects for philosophical guidance. (However, counselors will refer clients to a psychiatrist if they think they’re suffering from a serious mental health issue.) Clients pay about $100 a session for philosophically guided advice, and each session lasts roughly an hour.

“I saw so many people who had all these problems of living that seemed to be amenable to the thinking that students do in Philosophy 101 and Introduction to Logic,” Cohen says. He often draws on French existentialist Jean Paul Sartre, who believed that you are nothing more than your own actions. “If you don’t act, you don’t define yourself and you don’t become anything but a disappointed dream or expectation,” he adds.

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Would you ditch your therapist for a “philosophical counselor”?

Would you ditch your therapist for a “philosophical counselor”? | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Instead of going to traditional psychotherapists for advice and support, growing numbers of people are turning to philosophical counselors for particularly wise guidance. These counselors work much like traditional psychotherapists. But instead of offering solutions based solely on their understanding of mental health or psychology, philosophical counselors offer solutions and guidance drawn from the writings of great thinkers.

Millennia of philosophical studies can provide practical advice for those experiencing practical difficulties: There’s an entire field of philosophy that explores moral issues; stoic philosophers show us how to weather hardship; the existentialists advise on anxiety; and Aristotle was one of the first thinkers to question what makes a “good life.” All these topics make up a good chunk of any therapy session, philosophical or otherwise.

Philosophical counseling has been available since the early 1990s, when Elliot Cohen came up with the idea and founded the National Philosophical Counseling Association (NPCA) with around 20 counselors. The NPCA’s website suggests writer’s block, job loss, procrastination, and rejection are all appropriate subjects for philosophical guidance. (However, counselors will refer clients to a psychiatrist if they think they’re suffering from a serious mental health issue.) Clients pay about $100 a session for philosophically guided advice, and each session lasts roughly an hour.

“I saw so many people who had all these problems of living that seemed to be amenable to the thinking that students do in Philosophy 101 and Introduction to Logic,” Cohen says. He often draws on French existentialist Jean Paul Sartre, who believed that you are nothing more than your own actions. “If you don’t act, you don’t define yourself and you don’t become anything but a disappointed dream or expectation,” he adds.

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Massimo Pigliucci on Seneca’s Stoic philosophy of happiness – Massimo Pigliucci | Aeon Classics

Massimo Pigliucci on Seneca’s Stoic philosophy of happiness – Massimo Pigliucci | Aeon Classics | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Lucius Annaeus Seneca is a towering and controversial figure of antiquity. He lived from 4 BCE to 65 CE, was a Roman senator and political adviser to the emperor Nero, and experienced exile but came back to Rome to become one of the wealthiest citizens of the Empire. He tried to steer Nero toward good governance, but in the process became his indirect accomplice in murderous deeds. In the end, he was ‘invited’ to commit suicide by the emperor, and did so with dignity, in the presence of his friends.

Seneca wrote a number of tragedies that directly inspired William Shakespeare, but was also one of the main exponents of the Stoic school of philosophy, which has made a surprising comeback in recent years. Stoicism teaches us that the highest good in life is the pursuit of the four cardinal virtues of practical wisdom, temperance, justice and courage – because they are the only things that always do us good and can never be used for ill. It also tells us that the key to a serene life is the realisation that some things are under our control and others are not: under our control are our values, our judgments, and the actions we choose to perform. Everything else lies outside of our control, and we should focus our attention and efforts only on the first category.

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The daily habits of highly productive philosophers: Nietzsche, Marx & Immanuel Kant

The daily habits of highly productive philosophers: Nietzsche, Marx & Immanuel Kant | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it

The contemplative life requires discipline and hard work, for sure. But it also seems to require some time indulging carnal pleasures and much more time lost in thought.

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Derrida (2002)

Derrida is a 2002 American documentary film directed by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering Kofman about the French philosopher Jacques Derrida. It premiered at the 2...

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Michel Foucault: free lectures on truth, discourse & the self

Michel Foucault: free lectures on truth, discourse & the self | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it

Michel Foucault (1926-1984) was an enormously influential French philosopher who wrote, among other things, historical analyses of psychiatry, medicine, the prison system, and the function of sexuality in social organizations. He spent some time during the last years of his life at UC Berkeley, delivering several lectures in English. And happily they were recorded for posterity.

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How to Use Facebook Messenger for Business : Social Media Examiner

How to Use Facebook Messenger for Business : Social Media Examiner | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Do your customers use Facebook Messenger? Discover how to connect and engage with customers using Facebook Messenger.

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David Blundell's curator insight, May 9, 2016 1:28 PM
Everything's going mobile and Facebook Messanger has great potential for direct marketing with customers. Here's the skinny from the excellent @KristiHines . . .
seafowlericsson's comment, May 10, 2016 3:30 AM
Thats cold
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How to Find Facebook Post Ideas for Higher Organic Reach

How to Find Facebook Post Ideas for Higher Organic Reach | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
If you're looking for ideas to increase organic reach on Facebook, we have some Facebook post ideas and tools that will massively help.

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David Blundell's curator insight, May 19, 2016 3:27 AM
Is organic reach dead on Facebook? Not according to @RazorSocial 's Ian Cleary. Find out out tips and tools to improve your chances of success . . .
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Coming Soon: New Instagram Business Tools

Coming Soon: New Instagram Business Tools | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Instagram is a place where people can turn their passions into livelihoods. For instance, handmade accessory business JACKSON AND HYDE started an account a year and a half ago to raise awarenes

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David Blundell's curator insight, June 7, 2016 7:18 AM
We knew it was coming - Instagram For Business gives you new tools to make your Instagram page much more like an e market place - here's the skinny . . .
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Bertrand Russell and the case for 'Philosophy for Everyone'

Bertrand Russell and the case for 'Philosophy for Everyone' | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
One of the interesting questions we face as philosophers who are attempting to make philosophical ideas accessible for a general audience, is whether or not everyone can or should ‘do philosophy’.

Some philosophers wish to leave philosophy in the academy or university setting. Whereas others claim the downfall of modern philosophy came in the late 19th century when the subject was institutionalized within the research university setting. By condemning philosophy as only appropriate as a serious subject of study, philosophers have lost much widespread support and public recognition for its value.

Philosophers working in the public arena, such as those contributing to The Conversation and Cogito Philosophy Blog will defend the argument in favour of ‘philosophy for everyone’.
Bertrand Russell’s ‘Philosophy for Laymen’

In 1946 Bertrand Russell wrote an essay entitled Philosophy for Laymen, in which he defends the view that philosophy should be ‘a part of general education’. He proposes that,

even in the time that can easily be spared without injury to the learning of technical skills, philosophy can give certain things that will greatly increase the student’s value as a human being and as a citizen.

Clare Carlisle refers to Russell when she writes,

Russell revives an ancient conception of philosophy as a way of life in insisting that questions of cosmic meaning and value have an existential, ethical and spiritual urgency. (Of course, what we might mean by such terms is another issue for philosophers to grapple with.)

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Consciousness Isn’t a Mystery. It’s Matter.

Consciousness Isn’t a Mystery. It’s Matter. | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
Every day, it seems, some verifiably intelligent person tells us that we don’t know what consciousness is. The nature of consciousness, they say, is an awesome mystery. It’s the ultimate hard problem. The current Wikipedia entry is typical: Consciousness “is the most mysterious aspect of our lives”; philosophers “have struggled to comprehend the nature of consciousness.”

I find this odd because we know exactly what consciousness is — where by “consciousness” I mean what most people mean in this debate: experience of any kind whatever. It’s the most familiar thing there is, whether it’s experience of emotion, pain, understanding what someone is saying, seeing, hearing, touching, tasting or feeling. It is in fact the only thing in the universe whose ultimate intrinsic nature we can claim to know. It is utterly unmysterious.

The nature of physical stuff, by contrast, is deeply mysterious, and physics grows stranger by the hour. (Richard Feynman’s remark about quantum theory — “I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics” — seems as true as ever.) Or rather, more carefully: The nature of physical stuff is mysterious except insofar as consciousness is itself a form of physical stuff. This point, which is at first extremely startling, was well put by Bertrand Russell in the 1950s in his essay “Mind and Matter”: “We know nothing about the intrinsic quality of physical events,” he wrote, “except when these are mental events that we directly experience.” In having conscious experience, he claims, we learn something about the intrinsic nature of physical stuff, for conscious experience is itself a form of physical stuff.

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Pinning for PR: 3 successful Pinterest campaigns

Pinning for PR: 3 successful Pinterest campaigns | Dramatic.Philosophy | Scoop.it
PR professionals are going visual to tell their brands’ stories, and with over a third of U.S. women using Pinterest, the social platform is a huge draw for campaigns.

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David Blundell's curator insight, August 1, 2014 5:33 AM

Looking for some new ways to use Pinterest for marketing?  Here are 3 really imaginative campaigns to help spark your creativity . . .

Cool Invent's curator insight, August 3, 2014 2:50 PM

Can pinning contests get you more followers?