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Connecting the Physical & Digital Worlds: Smarter Systems for Smart Cities

Connecting the Physical & Digital Worlds: Smarter Systems for Smart Cities | Documentalista o Content Curator, purchè X.0 | Scoop.it
Technology is being used in ways you would never expect to help solve fundamental problems, from managing a football stadium on game day, to helping manage transportation systems and emergency operations.

As organizations and large facilities like stadiums, museums, schools and government buildings continue to grow and provide more people with faster, better, innovative services, we need to make them more efficient--not by cutting back services, but by getting insight and intelligence on how our physical world functions.
From roads to vehicles to buildings to HVAC systems and lights, thousands of objects not only need to be managed, but how they interact and affect each other must be optimized. By addressing and answering these fundamental questions, we can get real insight to drive better decision making and efficiency.

If we analyze this data, we can find inefficiencies or make connections we never would have imagined. By connecting the physical and digital worlds, these massive organizations that are part of our daily lives can deliver more efficient services to us all...
Via Lauren Moss, scatol8
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Rescooped by Alessandro Mazzoli from The Information Professional
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7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload, curated by Beth Kanter

7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload, curated by Beth Kanter | Documentalista o Content Curator, purchè X.0 | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

"The advice is from 1962 study and has been updated for today's daily battle with digital overload.   The techniques are very much still valid.

 

 

1. Omission – The concept is simple: you can’t consume everything, so just ignore some. This is a bit dangerous since some of the omitted information might be the most critical. Imagine that the email you ignored was the one where your most important client alerts you to a new opportunity.

 

2. Error – Respond to information without giving due consideration. While a seemingly poor strategy, this is more common than you might think; I mean, who hasn’t reacted to an email, report, or telephone call without thinking through all the consequences because of time constraints or lack of attention?

 

 

3. Queuing – Putting information aside until there is time catch up later. An example is processing email early in the morning, before the business day begins, or reading important reports late at night.

 

 

4. Filtering – This is similar to omission except filtering employs a priority scheme for processing some information while ignoring others. Automated tools are particularly well suited to help filter information. Recommendation engines, search tools, email Inbox rule engines and Tivo are all good examples of tools that can help filter and prioritize information.

 

5. Employing multiple/parallel channels – Doling out information processing tasks; for example, assigning the tracking of Twitter feeds to one person and blog coverage to another person on your team.

 

6. Approximation – Processing information with limited precision. Skimming is an example of approximation. Like omission and error, you can process more information by approximating, but you run the risk of making critical mistakes

 

7. Escaping from the task – Making this someone else’s problem. While it sounds irresponsible, admitting you can’t ‘do it all’ and giving an assignment to someone else is sometimes the best strategy of all."

 

 

 

 

 


Via Beth Kanter, Karen du Toit
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Robin Martin's comment, November 4, 2012 4:12 PM
Great info...thanks for "scooping" Deb!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 4, 2012 9:51 PM
You are welcome Robin. There's definitely some good interest in this topic!
Rescooped by Alessandro Mazzoli from The Information Professional
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Why Wikipedians should love librarians — Wikimedia blog

Why Wikipedians should love librarians — Wikimedia blog | Documentalista o Content Curator, purchè X.0 | Scoop.it

Posted by Sarah Stierch:

"Last year marked the start of Wikipedia Loves Libraries (WLL), and in 2012, WLL activities are in full swing, with many events planned in the coming month."

[...]

"The bottom line is that we share a common mission. We are dedicated to providing free access to information and knowledge. Wikipedians want to strengthen their articles by citing credible sources. If those sources are in print, or hidden behind paywalls, it undermines the important tenant of free access.
Libraries collect those same credible sources and make them freely available to patrons. Partnering with libraries helps keep sources free. Librarians value “information literacy,” which means teaching the general public to recognize, appreciate and rely on credible sources. Sound familiar? Teaching basic Wikipedia editing skills can be a great, practical way to re-enforce information literacy skills."


Via Karen du Toit
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