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Doctors 2.0 & You
Best Conference in Europe. Paris June 4-5, 2015. http://www.doctors20.com
Curated by Denise Silber
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Big Data: the key to solving healthcare's data problems?

Big Data: the key to solving healthcare's data problems? | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it

Lorraine Lawson writes:

 

'Oracle recently released a report noting, among other things, that healthcare isn’t prepared to manage Big Data. That’s hardly shocking, since healthcare seems largely inept at managing any data, much less Big Data, which is generally defined as having one or more of these characteristics:

 

* Variety, meaning structured, semi-structured and unstructured data
* Velocity, meaning you want it moved at high speeds
* Volume, think petabytes and terabytes

 

Maybe health care IT doesn’t have a data problem so much as it has a Big Data problem.

 

What do I mean? Well, most health care records actually fall into the domain of Big Data more than your typical, relational database kind of data. Specifically:

 

* Most health care records are actually unstructured data, e.g., text documents or images. Doctor’s notes on patients, nurse’s care plans, lab results, x-rays and MRI results all fall well outside the domain of structured data. I


* Health care data is often high volume, particularly when you’re talking about a state or national electronic health records system. What’s more, when you deal with images, like x-rays or other scans, you’re increasing the data’s volume in terms of storage requirements.


* Finally, most health care records need to be moved relatively quickly, and as individual records. So, if I’m having a consult tomorrow with a surgeon, then the x-rays need to be at the office by morning.

 

It looks like there’s a clear use case for Big Data technologies in health care.

 

In fact, if I may be so bold, maybe health care’s data problems are not entirely caused by niche vendors, data silos and a lack of investment.

 

Maybe the reason health care IT is such a mess is because the existing tools couldn’t handle Big Data needs in an affordable way.

 
Via Andrew Spong
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ONTD_Political - No More Skipping Your Medicine -- FDA Approves First Digital Pill

The Food and Drug Administration has just approved a device that is integrated into pills and let’s doctors know when patients take their medicine – and when they don’t.
 
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Rescooped by Denise Silber from ePatients
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Get Excited! Medicine X in 7 Weeks! | Medicine X Stanford

Get Excited! Medicine X in 7 Weeks! | Medicine X Stanford | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
The combination of practical experiences in the C3N project and preliminary research at the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence suggests that the online connectedness among patients of IBD should be improved.

 

 
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A New Mystery Awaits Crowdsourcers!

A New Mystery Awaits Crowdsourcers! | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
Since my recent keynote (A Geek Doctor Crowdsources Medicine) was published, I’ve been getting requests to find/crowdsource a diagnosis. Just take a look at the mystery of a mum I’ve been writing about in the past couple of days.
 
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Some Added Benefits of Patient Portals | iClinic World

Some Added Benefits of Patient Portals | iClinic World | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
Three out of four surveyed wanted their physicians to provide online services to schedule appointments, get test results, access medical records and exchange e‐mail. Confirming the attitude of consumers to embrace portals, ...
 
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Do we need mHealth to communicate the benefits of connecting ...

Do we need mHealth to communicate the benefits of connecting ... | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
mHealth Insight: the blog of 3G Doctor ... From there, the sell leaps at the speed of light to tech blogs, mags, Twitter, Facebook, to be analysed by geeks and translated for the rest of us into the manifesto of a better world.
 
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Kaiser’s Online Patient Portal Keeps Members in the Fold | PNN - Physicians News Network

Kaiser’s Online Patient Portal Keeps Members in the Fold | PNN - Physicians News Network | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
Let #patients #access their #medical #records! what a #concept. #kaiser has figured it out and its #paying off.

 

 
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A Doctor's Visit Without the Cold Stethoscope

A Doctor's Visit Without the Cold Stethoscope | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
It can take weeks to get a doctor's appointment and visiting the emergency room for a curious, but not so serious, ailment can be costly.
 
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Why do people go online for health information ? | World of DTC Marketing.com

Why do people go online for health information ? | World of DTC Marketing.com | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
More Than 8 in 10 Rate Nurses, Doctors Highly, in addition 70% of patients believe what their doctors tell them and don't get a second opinion. (Interesting stats --> Why do people go online for health information?
 
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Safeguarding Patient-Generated Health Information Created or Shared Through Mobile Devices

Safeguarding Patient-Generated Health Information Created or Shared Through Mobile Devices | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
Mobile health technologies are increasingly becoming a valuable tool for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare. A current example of work...
 
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Looking for an appointment with doctor? Check out eMedWorld ...

Looking for an appointment with doctor? Check out eMedWorld ... | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
eMedWorld is integrated with DocLynk.com, Medigrity's free-to-use professional and private networking platform designed for medical practitioners like physicians, surgeons, dentists, and medical students in India and abroad.
 
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Rescooped by Denise Silber from Mobile Healthcare
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The Age of 'Wearatronics': Advances for remote patient monitoring

The Age of 'Wearatronics': Advances for remote patient monitoring | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
In the beginning there was the triode, a vacuum-tube that heralded the early age of electronics. However, this age was limited because the triode was relatively bulky, required a lot of energy and, since it was made of glass, extremely fragile. Its replacement, the solid state field-effect transistor, was perhaps the greatest technological leap of the 20th century. The transistor reduced the size & power load of electronics while simultaneously improving their durability.We are now entering a new age of electronics, one in which new materials and interconnects have made circuit assemblies flexible (‘Flextronics‘) and, as a result, embeddable. We at Medgadget have been closely following flextronics as well as its subfield of wearable electronics, or “wearatronics,” over the last few years. The fundamental concept is that flexible electronic arrays may be embedded into textiles in order to, for example, measure the wearer’s vital signs or even generate and store power. In this post we would like to provide one timely example and two resources that you may use to learn more about wearatronics and stay ahead of the curve:

MC10, a leading company developing flexible electronics, informed Medgadget that it has signed an R&D contract with the US Army Natick Soldier Research, Development, & Engineering Center (NSRDEC) to “develop solar cells that are directly integrated into the fabric cover of combat helmets and rucksacks.” We have covered MC10 before because of their work on adding conformal electronics to medical devices, such as catheters and stents, and are interested by this new partnership that more directly relates to embedding electronics into textiles. Their CEO, David Icke, explains the recent move:

Soldiers today carry a lot of high-tech gear, but often go long periods of time without access to power. MC10 is providing a renewable power source that doesn’t add to the heavy load our soldiers already carry.

Given MC10′s existing partnerships with Reebok, Mass General Hospital, and others, we can expect to hear more about their work in the field of wearatronics.

In terms of the resource to learn more about wearatronics, our colleagues at GigaOm just released a research briefing earlier this week entitled “The wearable-computing market: a global analysis.” One highlight from the report is that the wearatronics market for just health and fitness products is estimated to reach 170 million devices within the next five years. We’ve quoted the report summary below:

What do Google’s Project Glass, Zephyr Technology and the Hug Shirt have in common? All are examples of wearables: computing devices that are always on, always accessible and easily worn on the body. With the growth of sensors and microelectronics, the potential uses of wearable-computing technologies now reach to health and fitness, gaming, fashion, disabilities and augmented reality. Most importantly, the widespread adoption of wearables will drive the form function and market for mobiles in vital ways. This report provides a historical background, an overview of the technologies in the wearables market and possible future trends as the market expands.
 
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National Archives Uses Web 2.0 Tools to Reach the Masses ...

When Dr. Rafael Lugo posted photos of a rare tumor to iRounds -- a social network for doctors-- he received immediate feedback from specialists nationwide and ultimately referred his patient to the appropriate doctor for treatment.
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New ad model fosters pharmas leap to digital, publisher finds

New ad model fosters pharmas leap to digital, publisher finds | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
Statistics show medical professionals are migrating toward iPads. Now, one medical journal publisher says, advertisers have followed.

Wolters Kluwer, publisher of medical journals and texts, says 50 companies, including five out of the top 20 pharmaceutical companies and six out of the top 20 device companies, have committed to advertise in 12 medical journals apps offered by the company.

 

“We're saying to advertisers, ‘We have a new way to reach physicians,'” said Karen Abramson, president and CEO of Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research, which includes Lippincott Williams and Wilkins journals as well as the Ovid print titles.

To be sure, adapting ads for any new medium needs to be carefully considered in light of FDA regulations, and many advertisers have been hesitant to enter the new space, says Wolters Kluwer.

To encourage them to make the jump to advertise on its apps, the publisher launched a new ad model. In January it stopped offering advertisers the option of purchasing print-only ads. Print and digital apps are bundled together at one price. The decision “is aimed at helping advertisers innovate their marketing strategies and benefit from the opportunity to offer ads in multimedia format (videos, tutorials on products, etc.),” said a spokesperson.

 

Meanwhile, the firm has migrated 52 of its journals, which cover new surgical techniques and medical advances, onto the iPad. Preliminary data across six specialties show the average amount of time an iPad reader spends interacting with an ad is on average between 10 and 40 seconds. Also, the addition of the iPad increased digital (web and app) page views between 30% and 70%. (The company said it doesn't have metrics on the subsequent digital ad engagement rate, or on how many seconds readers typically spend viewing print ads for its journals.)

 

“When someone is reading a print page, they're very unlikely to spend 10-30 seconds viewing an ad,” Abramson said. “The apps are able to engage their readers in a way that, quite frankly, journals in the print world cannot.”

 

Several of its journals now feature ads running on their iPad apps that allow readers to access video content. The videos display, in some cases, manufacturer presentation slides and live patient demonstrations.

 

An ad for Acorda Therapeutics drug Ampyra (dalfampridine), appearing in the July 10 issue of Neurology, offers a video demonstrating the increased motor skills of a patient with multiple sclerosis (the drug is approved to improve walking in patients with MS). The ad is part of a campaign the drugmaker has been running since January. An earlier ad had offered users an animation of Ampyra's mode of action.

 

On the device side, the June issue of Journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons features on its iPad app a full-page ad from device firm LifeCell with a play button taking users to a video showing LifeCell's SPY Elite System during an actual surgery.

Because the app drives a different customer experience than print, getting more pharma and device advertisers to take advantage of the medium will require education. “We are teaching advertisers about the notion of audience and not just print circulation, and that's been very appealing,” Abramson continued. “The typical behavior around print is you read it, put it on the shelf and don't come back. The behavior around digital is you repeat and repeat and repeat your view of the journal.”

 

On average, Wolters Kluwer has found, readers are coming back to a digitally published journal issue nine times, and peak use for an issue happens three to four weeks after the issue is published. There is a “long tail and a lot of repeat use, so you get considerably more exposure when you deal with a digital audience…than when dealing with a static print circulation.”

 
Via Thibaud Guymard
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Your doctor as a Facebook 'friend'? - The Seattle Times

Your doctor as a Facebook 'friend'? - The Seattle Times | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
The Seattle TimesYour doctor as a Facebook 'friend'?The Seattle TimesYour doctor as a Facebook 'friend'? Physicians are torn about using Facebook, Twitter and blogs in their practices.
 
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Patients use Google check a doctor reference check

Patients use Google check a doctor reference check | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
It’s time to get your reputations in order and realize what your patients are doing. Step 1, go Google your name!
 
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London NHS trusts: Let's BORG up our patient data :: WES Computing

“It would give us the opportunity to create a world leading institution, capable of attracting the best clinicians, that our patients, communities and staff can be proud of.” This article was originally published at Government ...
 
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Coverage Dropped? A Student Wages War on Twitter - WebMD (blog)

Coverage Dropped? A Student Wages War on Twitter - WebMD (blog) | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
WebMD (blog)Coverage Dropped? A Student Wages War on TwitterWebMD (blog)After some tests, doctors told him that he had Stage IV colon cancer that had invaded his abdominal wall.
 
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In My Humble Opinion: Is Social Media The New Doctor's Lounge?

That's right, for the last week I have been almost absent on Facebook and Twitter. Of course I ... It's been quite some time since the hub of physician social life and activism was centered around the doctor's lounge.
 
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'Virtual' Patients New Addition to Psychiatry? - MedicineNet

'Virtual' Patients New Addition to Psychiatry? - MedicineNet | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
A new generation of ('Virtual' Patients New Addition to Psychiatry?: Title: 'Virtual' Patients New Addition to Psychiatry?
 
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Cancer Patients Differ With Docs on QoL Issues : IMNG Oncology Report

Cancer Patients Differ With Docs on QoL Issues : IMNG Oncology Report | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
AMSTERDAM  – Ask a hematologist about the most serious quality of life issues for patients with multiple myeloma, and neuropathy typically tops the list.
 
Via Giovanna Marsico
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Get Excited! Medicine X in 7 Weeks! | Medicine X Stanford

Get Excited! Medicine X in 7 Weeks! | Medicine X Stanford | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
The combination of practical experiences in the C3N project and preliminary research at the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence suggests that the online connectedness among patients of IBD should be improved.

 

 
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What guidelines docs follow when interacting with patients online? | Doctor | PHARMAGEEK & SOCIAL MEDIA

What guidelines docs follow when interacting with patients online? | Doctor | PHARMAGEEK & SOCIAL MEDIA | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it
Doctors must remember that, when using social media as a means to communicate with people, they may not be able to verify that the person on the other end of the computer / tablet / mobile device is truly the patient; and likewise, the patient may...
 
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A Geek Doctor Crowdsources Medicine: Video (@Berci)

My recent keynote at the Doctors 2.0 and You event in Paris got a new, catchy title. I talked about how I met the old structures of medical communication and education as a geek and what kind of solutions I implemented through crowdsourcing.
 
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When smartphone apps play doctor

When smartphone apps play doctor | Doctors 2.0 & You | Scoop.it

Health app developers initially focused on consumer diet and exercise, said Brian Dolan, editor of Boston-based MobiHealthNews.com, which tracks advances in mobile health and medical technology. "Now we're seeing them look into more serious health conditions where there's a real need for innovation."


Glen Stream, president of the American Academy of Family Physicians, sees an "explosion" of mobile medical apps, and gives the trend a qualified endorsement. He's an "iPhone guy" who uses about 20 medical or health-oriented apps.
"People want to be empowered to take care of their health," Stream said. The devices and apps, Stream said, "certainly are not going to replace the need for a collaborative relationship with a family physician."

 
Via Andrew Spong
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