Doctor
28.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Doctor
Diagnosing the contemporary healthcare professional's digital habits
Curated by Andrew Spong
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Smartphone app alerts doctor when patient exhibits symptoms

Smartphone app alerts doctor when patient exhibits symptoms | Doctor | Scoop.it
MIT researchers developed an app, Ginger.io, that collects data about its users behaviors, locations, health conditions and habits and then notes inconsistencies that may predict the onset of problems such as depression. The app alerts health care providers for intervention.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The doctor will Skype you now: is e-consulting a good idea?

The doctor will Skype you now: is e-consulting a good idea? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Electronic consultation systems use the Internet to deliver health services to people all around the world and has been shown to reduce unnecessary visits to specialists, with a meaningful percentage of cases being resolved without a face-to-face visit. As a result, wait times are less for those who really do need to see a specialist. Skype is one method that is popular among health-care providers today. 

more...
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

LinkedIn, HCP communities and facebook matter most to the 56% of clinicians who use social professionally

LinkedIn, HCP communities and facebook matter most to the 56% of clinicians who use social professionally | Doctor | Scoop.it

When it comes to social media, the top sites that doctors do seem to use for work are LinkedIn, online physician communities, and Facebook (see chart below). The specialities that reported the most use of online physician communities were ophthalmology, geriatrics, psychiatry, otolaryngology, and oncology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Surgeons who use 3D printing to help explain patients’ conditions to them

Surgeons who use 3D printing to help explain patients’ conditions to them | Doctor | Scoop.it

Bioprinting continues to make significant strides towards a process that will involve dispensing cells onto biocompatible scaffolding using successive layers to generate tissue-like 3D structures and organs.

 

Along the way, however, there will be a number of interim steps that can also benefit the healthcare community. An excellent example of this is highlighted in a new study Physical Models of Renal Malignancies Using Standard Cross-Sectional Imaging and 3-Dimensional Printers: A Pilot Study.

 

The authors of the study, who work in theDepartment of Urology at Tulane University School of Medicine; were looking for a method of providing 3-dimensional models of patient’s kidneys based on cross-sectional imaging. According to Jonathan Silberstein, Assistant Professor of Urology, providing such a model “may aid patients, trainees, and clinicians in their comprehension, characterization, localization, and extirpation of suspicious renal masses.”

more...
Bettina Gifford's curator insight, July 18, 2014 4:21 PM

Really interesting use of 3D printing

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Mount Sinai's Patient Itinerary app recognises that being organised and informed supports good outcomes

Mount Sinai's Patient Itinerary app recognises that being organised and informed supports good outcomes | Doctor | Scoop.it

A new “Patient Itinerary” app now gives patients at The Mount Sinai Hospital a detailed schedule of upcoming treatments, procedures and tests.

more...
Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, July 4, 2014 9:23 AM

This is brilliant! A pure WIN/WIN!

Time saved for hospital staff and visibility/transparency for patient.

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

We don’t need no FOAM Curriculum

We don’t need no FOAM Curriculum | Doctor | Scoop.it
Amid enthusiastic discussion (at opposite ends of the earth) of the need for a FOAM curriculum, I say no. Read on to find out why.
Andrew Spong's insight:

Only just stumbled across this eloquent exposition from 2013 of why #FOAMed is dismantling the idea of the curriculum in medical education.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Frederic Llordachs: “We’re returning to the health care model where the patient received all care at home”

Frederic Llordachs: “We’re returning to the health care model where the patient received all care at home” | Doctor | Scoop.it
Frederic Llordachs is what is called a health care and well being entrepreneur. He recognized the potential of the Internet in his field right away, and he admits that many colleagues didn’t take his initiative seriously at first. Currently, Doctoralia, of which Llordach is a founding partner, has more than 2 million users monthly and has a network of more than 73,000 medical professionals. Does the health care system as we know it have an expiration date?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The top 20 healthcare app categories, ranked by number of apps available

Mobile phone technologies have evolved to handle increasingly complex tasks. While the majority of apps are designed for simple tasks, some of the more sophisticated ones can handle high resolution imaging, real-time monitoring and other advanced functions.


Based on functional complexity, vision care apps lead the market, followed by medical sensors and specialised apps for patients with psoriasis, cardiovascular conditions, cancer support, apps for medical reference, baby care and others.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Samsung introduces Simband modular health band powered by open source SAMI platform

Samsung introduces Simband modular health band powered by open source SAMI platform | Doctor | Scoop.it

At a “Voice of the Body” event today in San Francisco, Samsung president and chief strategy officer Young Sohn announced the company’s vision of an open health-sensor platform. That vision results in the Simband modular wrist band.

 

The demonstration Simband device shown at the event showed vitals in real-time. The wrist band uses light sensors and bio impedance sensors to measure your body. The information tracked is shared with the SAMI cloud network. The entire system is open to developers and modular.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Nano-electronics research centre Imec and Samsung join to accelerate innovation in digital health

Imec, the world-leading nano-electronics research centre announced today that it is collaborating with Samsung Electronics to accelerate innovation and collaboration among technology companies and researchers working in the burgeoning mobile wearable field.

 

The announcement comes as part of Samsung's recently announced digital health initiative, which aims to facilitate the development of wearable sensors that can help users gain new insights into their own wellness and enable them to live healthier lives. A centerpiece of the announcement is Samsung's Simband platform, which includes an open reference sensor module integrating the industry's most advanced sensing technologies from Imec.

 

The sensor array promises to bring a new understanding of the body's inner workings to the world of consumer health monitoring. 

Andrew Spong's insight:

This announcement sounds like a step forward, and makes Apple's HealthKit fluff look more and more like an exercise in chair-moving.

 

The Simband platform will take digital health a step towards a NIAP (non-invasive, all-pervasive) sensor-driven healthcare future based on prevention rather than treatment.

 

The notion of quantifying our health can be no more than a hobbyist indulgence for a minute and privileged subsection of the population until this point is reached.

 

And this creation of the conditions of possibility for informed health self-management is where we need to be if our future healthcare offering is going to be sustainable.

more...
Wax Sativa's curator insight, June 8, 2014 11:29 AM

no more hiv aid,cancer,epilepsy,pain and trauma

our research our %100 guarantee

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

ASCO highlights oncology clinician Twitter users, and the hashtags they favour

ASCO highlights oncology clinician Twitter users, and the hashtags they favour | Doctor | Scoop.it
Andrew Spong's insight:

This is the first time I've seen something like this.

 

I think ASCO have got it right straight out of the blocks, and offer a model of best practice with regard to how best to promote clinical conversation around their congress inside and outside the convention centre.

 

Next up will be a companion patient opinion leader infographic, I hope :)

more...
Gilbert C FAURE's curator insight, May 30, 2014 5:54 AM

do you like twitter congresses?

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

IBM Watson: The voice of the physician on the future of healthcare

Perspectives from top MDs and healthcare professionals on healthcare's most pressing challenges and IBM Watson's potential role in addressing them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

How the patient portal is changing medical practice

How the patient portal is changing medical practice | Doctor | Scoop.it

"Medical practice has begun its inevitable journey toward this transformation when, unless an exam or a procedure is required, most medical questions and answers, as well as virtually all medication refills and renewals, appointment requests, interpretation and discussion of the implications of lab and imaging results will be conducted online rather than in the office.

 

The reimbursement system in the health care of the future will simply have to take this into account, as we slowly transition to a fee-for-service to a care management."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Smartphones: the new stethoscopes

Smartphones: the new stethoscopes | Doctor | Scoop.it

Among the many instruments your doctor uses — stethoscope, thermometer, scale — the most valuable one may be in her pocket: a smartphone.   Due to increasingly compressed office visits, patients are becoming more active participants in managing their healthcare, and a new generation of Internet-savvy physicians is using social media to improve the way they run their practices. Currently, 67 percent of physicians use social media — sites like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Pinterest — for professional purposes, according to a recent report released by the Federation of State Medical Boards. One Yahoo Facebook user reported that her nurse practitioner gives advice over the social networking site, while another said sharing photos and videos can even save her a trip to the office.   “Social media is changing the way people give and receive information and, as a result, the medical profession is changing, too,” Lee Aase, social media director at the Mayo Clinic, tells Yahoo Health.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Survey: 80% of smartphone users would like to use their devices to interact with HCPs

Survey: 80% of smartphone users would like to use their devices to interact with HCPs | Doctor | Scoop.it

A survey (n=2,239) of smartphone users across geographies found that:

 

* 71% of smartphone users are open to offers of relevant health care services from businesses

* 80% of patients would like the option to use their smartphones to interact with health care providers

* 56% of people worldwide trust health care organisations with personal data and indicated that while e-health records have yet to take off in many countries, innovations around mobile alerts and information services are helping build trust

more...
Marcus Healey's curator insight, July 15, 2014 4:24 PM

The impending m-health revolution is in its infancy, but coming sooner than planned?

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

3D printing the human circulatory system

3D printing the human circulatory system | Doctor | Scoop.it

From skin to guns to customisable phone covers to mini-robots, the capacities of 3D printing are widening all the time.

Now, in a development that could have big implications in the transplant field, scientists have figured out how to print a circulatory system which is vital to keeping tissue alive.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

What can oncologists learn from social media?

What can oncologists learn from social media? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Dr. Matthew Katz (@subatomicdoc) describes how he uses social media to learn more about patient perceptions of cancer, how to decide which social media to use, and drawbacks to using social media in a professional capacity.

Andrew Spong's insight:

One of my long-time, trusted clinical voices in oncology shares his insights in this video.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Who will win the health app race?

Who will win the health app race? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Apple debuted HealthKit at its Worldwide Developers Conference and Google followed a few weeks later with GoogleFit at its I/O conference.

 

It is clear that Apple and Google see health apps as a major feature for future iPhones, iPads and Android devices. Where this gets interesting is how the two companies will vie for supremacy and where they identify their best marketplace opportunities...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Andrew Spong from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices

Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices | Doctor | Scoop.it

Eighty percent of smartphone users are interested in using their smartphones to interact with health care providers, according to a FICO survey of 2,239 adult smartphone users from the UK, Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, and the United States.

The survey analyzed how consumers prefer to interact with health care providers on mobile devices, online and in-person.


Via Alex Butler
more...
Helen Adams's curator insight, July 3, 2014 4:22 AM

Now that depends on what they mean by "interact", are they meaning consultation with their HCP or accessing test results and repeat prescriptions.

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Amazon Fire Phone's array of sensors could make it an attractive health platform

Amazon Fire Phone's array of sensors could make it an attractive health platform | Doctor | Scoop.it
Sensors on the Amazon Fire Phone could be a boon for mobile health apps that involve physical therapy, scanning the eyes and face and therapeutic gaming.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Digital health: from sensors to data fusion (video)

Digital health: from sensors to data fusion (video) | Doctor | Scoop.it

All grit, no fluff. One of the best digital healthcare surveys I've seen from the University of Oxford's Lionel Tarrasenko.

 

Note the emphasis on non-invasive sensors in digital health and data fusion in analytics.

 

If you only watch one digital health video this year, make it this one.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Apple's WWDC14 footshot raises clinician questions about validation of HealthKit's utility

Apple's WWDC14 footshot raises clinician questions about validation of HealthKit's utility | Doctor | Scoop.it

Yesterday at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference, an image flashed up on the screen behind VP of Software Engineering Craig Federighi. It was a screen shot from Apple’s new Health app (or a mockup thereof), showing a user’s blood glucose level.

 

But Apple biffed the measurement for blood glucose level, as Aaron Rowe of biochemical sampling device maker Integrated Plasmonics pointed out. It’s measured in mg/dL. Apple’s slide said “mL/dL.”

 

“It will be really important for companies to justify their interpretations of the information they provide to achieve physician buy in,” said Dr. Molly Maloof, a San Francisco Bay Area clinical physician focused on health optimization. “Otherwise, these consumer-focused devices will be written off as health toys rather than health tools.”


“I personally feel they should have an entire team of clinical researchers and medical doctors on their staff rather than just device experts because what they need is clinical validation that the tool is useful,” Dr. Maloof says.

more...
Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, June 5, 2014 7:18 AM

“I personally feel they should have an entire team of clinical researchers and medical doctors on their staff rather than just device experts because what they need is clinical validation that the tool is useful,” Dr. Maloof says"

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Survey: more than a third of physicians had recommended that patients use health apps in the past year

Survey: more than a third of physicians had recommended that patients use health apps in the past year | Doctor | Scoop.it

From Manhattan Research's 'Taking the Pulse U.S. 2014' study: 

 

* Forty-seven percent of physician smartphone owners had shown patients images or videos on their devices,

* More than a third of physicians had recommended that patients use health apps in the past year.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Clinician, patient, and family social media pioneers in UK health

Andrew Spong's insight:

This is great piece of work that serves to define the utility of social media in a healthcare setting, spotlight expert practitioners, and offer advice and encouragement to new entrants all at once.

 

Grab this free PDF right now.

more...
rob halkes's curator insight, May 28, 2014 1:02 PM

Great to see the original pioneers in the UK ;-)

Denise Silber's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:37 PM

I just scooped this from @andrewspong Come meet him in Paris at Doctors 2.0 & You June 5-6

 

 
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The importance of humanising healthcare Technology 

The importance of humanising healthcare Technology  | Doctor | Scoop.it

"Technology has seriously upped the ante when it comes to enabling patients to be informed and educated about their health. There are more than70,000 websites that disseminate health information.


As exciting as this may sound, access to the general public is often hindered by design issues (poor navigation, writing at graduate level, and disorganization) and questionable quality and accuracy of information.


We can do better."

more...
No comment yet.