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Diagnosing the contemporary healthcare professional's digital habits
Curated by Andrew Spong
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How to grow your hospital's social media presences

How to grow your hospital's social media presences | Doctor | Scoop.it
"Perhaps one of the biggest social media challenges for a hospital is how to manage its expansion and growth into various groups or departments within the institution."
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What does it mean for a Resident Physician to be 'participatory'?

What does it mean for a Resident Physician to be 'participatory'? | Doctor | Scoop.it
"On the backdrop of an amazingly intense work environment is thrust a new movement, led by patients and providers alike, asking simply, How we can do better through participatory medicine?"
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Which generation of physicians uses the most mobile technology?

Which generation of physicians uses the most mobile technology? | Doctor | Scoop.it
"Smartphones and tablets have reached 80% of physicians across all practice types, locations and years in practice, and 25% of users are “Super Mobile” physicians who use both types of mobile devices. This is far beyond the general population’s 50% adoption of smartphones and 5% adoption of tablets."
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Hospital scans palms to track patients

Hospital scans palms to track patients | Doctor | Scoop.it
The New York University Langone Medical Center started scanning palms last month to reduce paperwork and prevent identity theft using a device that images the veins in a patient’s hand.
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Doctor-patient conversation: not just for the office

Doctor-patient conversation: not just for the office | Doctor | Scoop.it
Paul Cerrato writes:

"If you're old enough, you probably remember visiting the doctor's office in the 1950s. It was like walking into a church. The waiting room was quiet, and when you met with the doctor, it was: "Yes, doctor. No, doctor. Whatever you say, doctor." Mostly it was: Speak when you're spoken to.

That kind of reverential tone has disappeared from medical practice, mostly for the better. Patients have much higher expectations of their caregivers and shop around to find clinicians who are willing to communicate, not just face to face but electronically as well."
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How Aintree achieved digital switchover for patient records

How Aintree achieved digital switchover for patient records | Doctor | Scoop.it
Aintree University hospital trust has reduced C. difficile infections by 69 percent and improved patient satisfaction by 20 percent in just 18 months, after modernising its approach to patient record keeping and information sharing.
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Patients have problems finding health info on the Internet and using it appropriately

Patients have problems finding health info on the Internet and using it appropriately | Doctor | Scoop.it
Glen Laffel (@pizaazz) writes:

"What should we do?

First, we need to recognize there is a problem[...] It is dangerous and often flat-out wrong to assume that, just because the Internet has become ubiquitous, people know how to use it properly.

As for the age of the 'empowered e-patient', this study suggests that millions of people, perhaps tens or hundreds of millions, aren’t quite there yet.

Even today, medical professionals must act as curators of credible information. They shouldn’t assume their patients can identify and use evidence-based information from the Internet. Minimally, their job is to steer patients away from the sponsored sites and ones touting miracle cures, and towards the ones which are more reliable and free from bias."
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Does an iPad make a resident doctor's life easier?

Does an iPad make a resident doctor's life easier? | Doctor | Scoop.it
"The University of Chicago's Internal Medicine residency program has implemented iPads as tools for the doctors.

It looks like a great initiative, but the question is: will it make life easier or will the residents just spend more time typing into the iPad than they would if they used normal computers on the wards?"
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The importance of social media to healthcare professionals

The importance of social media to healthcare professionals | Doctor | Scoop.it
Social media allows doctors, nurses, other health professionals and health care companies to connect and engage with community and colleagues.
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LinkedIn for healthcare professionals: 10 tips

LinkedIn for healthcare professionals: 10 tips | Doctor | Scoop.it
Whilst many physicians create LinkedIn profiles and let them stagnate. painting a fuller professional online portrait is worth the effort for healthcare professionals.
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Who will drive Social Media use in healthcare?

Who will drive Social Media use in healthcare? | Doctor | Scoop.it
Jamie Rauscher (@jamierauscher) writes:

"If physicians are to remain a relevant source of medical information for patients, they will need to establish their presence online as well as offline."
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Some reflections on social media and primary health care

Some reflections on social media and primary health care | Doctor | Scoop.it
"Last week was pivotal for me in that I realised that I can no longer exist without a Twitter account."
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Paging Dr. Facebook

Paging Dr. Facebook | Doctor | Scoop.it
A provocative take on the recent 'Kawasaki disease diagnosed via facebook' story from pediatrician Russell Saunders, MD:

"I’m not a big, big fan of the Internet as source of medical information. I’m certainly no big fan of polling one’s friends for their diagnosis and using that as a basis for medical decision-making.

That said, two of the author’s facebook friends are pediatricians, and facebook was merely the medium by which informal medical advice was given. It’s really no different than when a good friend calls for a casual second opinion.

This article says more about the somewhat curious calm of this mother in the (literal) face of increasingly bad symptoms and seemingly piss-poor follow-up on the family doctor’s part. This mother shouldn’t have needed facebook, when an appropriately vigilant medical provider would have been the obvious choice."
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Connected Health and the doctor-patient relationship

Connected Health and the doctor-patient relationship | Doctor | Scoop.it
"Imagine a discussion with your doctor or nurse at your regular office visit. Instead of asking you about your weight, or your recent exercise level, the health professional looks at a screen and begins a dialogue with you about how adherent you have or haven’t been to the care plan you agreed on.

Scary thought? Nowhere to hide? Perhaps, but once you have embraced the need for certain health behavior changes, these tools promote an honest dialogue with your provider."
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Integrating Social Media into emergency-preparedness efforts

Integrating Social Media into emergency-preparedness efforts | Doctor | Scoop.it
'Despite blocked Internet service, new social media such as "speak-to-tweet” (which allows brief Twitter messages to be sent through a voice connection) were being used to improve communication about health and safety within the first few days of the 2011 Egyptian uprising, which had itself been organized by means of social media.

After Haiti's 2010 earthquake, Ushahidi, an open-source Web platform that uses “crowd-sourced” information to support crisis management, linked health care providers requiring supplies to those who had them, and victims trapped under the rubble used Facebook to reach out for help'
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Social Media use by US hospitals: the statistics

Social Media use by US hospitals: the statistics | Doctor | Scoop.it
Walter van den Broek (@DrShock) summarizes the findings of a paper published in the Annals of Interval Medicine that presents a structured review of websites of 1,800 US hospitals focusing on their Facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts:

* 21% use social media
* More likely to be large, urban hospitals run by nonprofit, nongovernment organisations
* More likely to participate in graduate medical education
* Use social media to target a general audience (97%)
* Provide content about the entire organization (93%)
* Announce news and events (91%)
* Further public relations (89%)
* Promote health (90%).
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On doctors practicing what they preach in the age of shared decision making

On doctors practicing what they preach in the age of shared decision making | Doctor | Scoop.it
Anthony Youn, MD (@TonyYounMD) writes:

"What do you call a chain-smoking, morbidly obese, soda addict who just graduated medical school?

Yep. Doctor.

How would you feel if he were your doctor? Would you listen to him if he asked you to adopt a healthier lifestyle?"

I thought his observations particularly germane to the question of healthcare professional-patient relations in the age of participatory medicine and shared decision making.
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Log on to Social Media to reach service users

Log on to Social Media to reach service users | Doctor | Scoop.it
Jenni Middleton (@nursingtimesed) writes:

"People’s expectations are higher than they were 10 years ago - of their local restaurant, their business hotel and yes, rightly or wrongly, of [their] hospital, GP surgery or clinic.

The lessons being learnt by big businesses about social media are equally applicable to [healthcare]. And, it’s often easier, more effective and cheaper to use these sites rather than traditional methods."
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eDischarge helps manage summertime patients in Cornwall

eDischarge helps manage summertime patients in Cornwall | Doctor | Scoop.it
Cornwall’s population doubles every summer, putting extra pressure on Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust (RCHT) as the hospital’s pediatrics department is flooded with young patients suffering from illness or injury while on holiday.

The eDischarge solution from IMS MAXIMS helps the hospital manage patients more efficiently, ensuring faster service.
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Practices must define the investment before considering the return

Practices must define the investment before considering the return | Doctor | Scoop.it
"Investment should be looked at from two different perspectives - the initial investment and the ongoing investment.

Within these two different perspectives, investment will take one of two forms – either time or money."
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Social media presents a medical ethics challenge

Social media presents a medical ethics challenge | Doctor | Scoop.it
"I’d say in two years of Twitter I’ve been astounded at a health professional’s tweet maybe seven times. The most outrageous was a series of sexually explicit comments (from a shady lady) which had been happily retweeted by a paramedic I was ‘following’. How they could possibly have thought they were appropriate to share with a public audience I don’t know.

Medical students and, on occasion juniors, can also be thoughtless. I know of a nurse who is now subject to disciplinary proceedings for taking a picture of a patient’s wound with her phone and posting it on Facebook under the heading “Urrgghh!”. I’ve never seen a tweet from a doctor or medical student that breaches patient confidentiality like that, but I have read comments that compromise both individual and collective professionalism.

Expletive laden tirades about forthcoming exams, the end of a night shift, or the prospect of a night on the tiles, have been the most common. Medical students are infamous for their bar room antics, but what they need to understand is that social media takes their comments out of the college bar and drops them in squarely in the public bar, where there might be a lot of other people ‘listening’."
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Doctors cautiously wade into social media

Doctors cautiously wade into social media | Doctor | Scoop.it
As they follow their patients' online migration, medical professionals have to tread especially carefully when it comes to privacy and legal concerns.
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Doctors and staff are key to patient satisfaction in hospital care

Doctors and staff are key to patient satisfaction in hospital care | Doctor | Scoop.it
Data from nearly 3,800 US hospitals says that there’s been a 1.6 percent annual increase in the number of positive responses in the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey.

The findings are from HealthGrades, which looked at HCAHPS survey data from April 2009 to March 2010.

Patients were most satisfied with the discharge instructions; 81 percent of respondents said they received this information. And patients were least satisfied with the quietness of their rooms (55 percent satisfied) and explanation of medications (58 percent satisfied).
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Smartphone bans: Does your hospital need a policy?

Smartphone bans: Does your hospital need a policy? | Doctor | Scoop.it
Do physicians and patients alike consider themselves entitled to use their mobile devices anytime, anywhere?

This article suggests that some hospitals are reporting that their patients are texting during clinical procedures.
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Sermo develops realtime medical mobile app for docs

Sermo develops realtime medical mobile app for docs | Doctor | Scoop.it
Online physician community Sermo has launched Sermo Mobile, a free medical app for its exclusive network of more than 120,000 physicians which allows doctors to access medical information in real-time.

The mobile app was derived from Sermo's current web platform, which provides an online resource to physicians nationwide across 68 specialties to consult and confer with on the highest quality care for their patients.
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Andrew Spong's comment, July 19, 2011 7:09 AM
I'm left wondering whether an exclusive app for an exclusive community is helping bring Sermo's professional membership any closer to its patients, or whether there is in fact real value in niche apps such as this to help healthcare professionals support the shared decision making agenda more effectively.

I don't have an iPhone, so could someone please verify whether the app is visible in the App store, and that downloaders have to enter a Sermo ID?