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Diagnosing the contemporary healthcare professional's digital habits
Curated by Andrew Spong
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Mobile medical devices are no longer optional

Mobile medical devices are no longer optional | Doctor | Scoop.it

In interview with iMedical Apps, Eric Yablonka, CIO of the University of Chicago hospitals and Pritzker School of Medicine said:

 

"The coming evolution in the sector of biomedical devices that are now wireless enabled, such as sensor and body area networks, implantable sensors - we see these things coming fast and furious over the next four to five years.

 

Their evolution will come very rapidly and there has to be a way to connect those in a meaningful way. You know, the iPhone 4S has the Bluetooth Low Energy capability, the first device in the US with this technology.'

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'NHS staff aren't stupid. Their misuse of Facebook is'

'NHS staff aren't stupid. Their misuse of Facebook is' | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Ultimately, the onus is on individual staff to behave appropriately – and the majority do. But there are things that NHS organisations and the government can do to aid this process.'

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Doctors urged to tell obese patients of cancer danger

Doctors urged to tell obese patients of cancer danger | Doctor | Scoop.it

Healthcare workers are failing to tell obese patients about the risk of developing cancer because they do not know how to approach the subject, according to Scots researchers.

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Mindfulness and its impact on doctor-patient relations

Mindfulness and its impact on doctor-patient relations | Doctor | Scoop.it

'There has been a growing awareness among doctors that being mindful, or fully present and attentive to the moment, not only improves the way they engage with patients but also mitigates the stresses of clinical practice.

 

Mounting paperwork demands and other time and productivity pressures can lead to physician burnout, which affects as many as one in three doctors, recent studies have shown. The loss of enthusiasm and engagement that results can lead to increased errors, decreased empathy and compassion toward patients and poor professionalism. Other problems include physician substance abuse, abandonment of clinical practice and even suicide.'

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Your smartphone: social media interfacing vs. telephony

Your smartphone: social media interfacing vs. telephony | Doctor | Scoop.it

Taylor Martin writes:

 

'Over the past two years, my cell phone usage has almost entirely changed. I used to use it strictly for productivity – taking notes in class, keeping a schedule, making voice calls and a lot of other boring, mundane stuff. Recently, however, I have noticed that almost 90 percent of my use for cell phones is social.'

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App gives hospital a presence in patients' pockets

App gives hospital a presence in patients' pockets | Doctor | Scoop.it

"We wanted to have a presence in peoples' pockets. Cell phones are such a ubiquitous device, people are carrying them and using them for so many different things," said Lourdes Chief Medical Officer Dr. Robert Taylor.

 

And health care is one of those things. Hop on to the app store and there are dozens of apps that can aid patients in their health care. But just because there are hundreds of social media tools you can use to diagnose symptoms, track down the best medicine to take, or even track the progress of a pregnancy doesn't mean you can add 'MD' to the end of your name.

 

"The single best person to guide you through the health care maze is your own personal physician," Dr. Taylor said.'

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As Docs warm up to EHRs, Patients still want paper

As Docs warm up to EHRs, Patients still want paper | Doctor | Scoop.it

'There's a bit of a gap between patients and doctors when it comes to electronic health records (EHRs). A new survey indicates that, by a slight margin, the majority of doctors think EHRs are safer than paper records. But more than half of all patients prefer paper. A closer look at the data can help explain the difference of opinion.

 

In a recent survey of healthcare professionals and patients, of the physicians surveyed, 54% said they thought EHRs were safer. Only 18% selected paper as the more secure option. The remainder didn't answer or didn't know.

 

As for the patients surveyed, 47% said paper records are safer, with 39% saying digital records are more secure. The rest were unsure.'

 

[AS: Is this your experience? What do you make of this data?]

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American Telemedicine Association, mHealth Initiative weigh in on FDA’s mobile medical app guidelines

American Telemedicine Association, mHealth Initiative weigh in on FDA’s mobile medical app guidelines | Doctor | Scoop.it

Two more healthcare organizations are weighing in on guidelines proposed by the FDA to regulate mobile medical apps, joining other groups such as the mHealth Regulatory Coalition and HIMSS to offer comments and concerns on the future of mHealth regulation.

 

”The ATA recognizes the fundamental importance of government to regulate the practice of medicine and strongly supports a regulatory mechanism to assure patients, providers and payers that mobile health applications are safe,” wrote ATA CEO Jonathan D. Linkous. “However, in developing such regulations it is critical that the regulations be clearly and carefully written in order to advance mHealth.”

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Solutions in health: crossing borders

Solutions in health: crossing borders | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Health challenges are similar throughout the world, although they present themselves in different ways.

 

Health care is too costly, both for governments and individuals, and there isn’t enough of it; the doctor-patient ratio in most countries in the world is too low to allow everyone to access to a physician; preventative health is often overlooked and creates great long-term health challenges down the line. These are stories are common all over the world.'

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9 out of 10 Physicians feel Mood Disorders negatively impact diabetes care

9 out of 10 Physicians feel Mood Disorders negatively impact diabetes care | Doctor | Scoop.it

A new study of over 5,000 clinicians by QuantiaMD, suggests:

 

* Nearly 90% of clinicians indicate that mood disorders result in non-adherence to self-care instructions. Also of note, study participants believe lack of patient motivation is a greater barrier to reaching critical care goals than lack of education.

* A majority of respondents (56%) report that at least one-quarter of their patients have a mood disorder such as depression, while 13% say that over half of their patients have a mood disorder.

* Respondents report that many patients are not reaching critical care goals, with only 26% of patients reaching exercise goals and 31% reaching weight loss goals in their first year after diagnosis. Over half of clinicians say patients fall short of their weight and exercise goals due to their own lack of motivation, while only a small fraction of physicians (3%) feel that insufficient understanding of what they need to do is solely responsible, clearly highlighting patient motivation as fundamental to successful diabetes treatment.

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$42M to improve doctor-patient relations 'a waste of money'

$42M to improve doctor-patient relations 'a waste of money' | Doctor | Scoop.it

Malcom Kushner writes:

 

 

'The University of Chicago recently announced a donation of $42 million to create an institute dedicated to the improvement of doctor-patient relations.

 

How will the $42 million be spent? The article in The New York Times suggested much of it would go to developing new classes to "empower med students to be nicer to patients."

 

Really? That seems like a waste of money. Why create new classes when a whole curriculum of tried-and-true courses already exists. It's called vet school.

 

Think about it. Veterinarians are always nice to their patients. And their patients never complain about doctor-patient relations. So if med students could get the same training -- problem solved.

 

Of course I could be completely wrong about this.'

 

[AS: Yes, being wrong about this is a distinct possibility.]

 

 

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A unified patient information management system

A unified patient information management system | Doctor | Scoop.it

'UPIM is a patient-centric approach to healthcare information management. It provides single-source access to integrated administrative, clinical and financial information from health plans, patients, physicians and other sources of data — improving the delivery, sharing and management of patient data. And as a result, improving patient care.'

 

[AS: this teeters on the verge of being an advert, which I don't curate, but I was interested in the way the health data management issue was presented by UPIM. What do you think: spin, or substance?]

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St. Jude may be exploring smartphone integration with its remote cardiac monitoring system

St. Jude may be exploring smartphone integration with its remote cardiac monitoring system | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Remote monitoring systems integrating implanted cardiac devices, like St. Jude's Merlin.net, have a lot of potential for integration with mobile devices.'

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Mobisante to bring their smartphone ultrasound probe to Android phones

Mobisante to bring their smartphone ultrasound probe to Android phones | Doctor | Scoop.it

'With the release of their Ice Cream Sandwich OS, also called Android 4.0, Google will robustly support USB host mode — enabling phones to use USB devices similar to a traditional computer.

 

This type of robust connectivity prompted me to contact Mobisante, makers of the much heralded smartphone ultrasound device, MobiUS. One of their biggest limitations has been the inability to have proper USB 2.0 host support to connect to smartphones, forcing them to use an outdated Windows Mobile 6.5 OS on a Toshiba smartphone.'

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Consumers' use, preference & expectations of hospital social media

Consumers' use, preference & expectations of hospital social media | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Consumers’ Use, Preference and Expectations of Hospital Social Media' is the first in the Decision Support Series from YouGov Healthcare. The report examines consumer expectations of hospital social media presence, and how that presence impacts consumers’ perceptions of hospitals and hospital selection. The report also looks at the changing demographics of likely hospital social media audiences. Report topline results:

 

* 57 percent said that a social media connection with a hospital was likely to have a strong impact on their decision to seek treatment at that hospital.

* One in four consumers said that they are likely to connect with hospitals in the future.

* Those most likely to connect are women between the age of 36 and 64

* 81 percent of consumers believe that if a hospital has a strong social media presence, they are likely to be more cutting edge, creating a halo effect across clinical functions

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Doctors' manners can affect patient outcomes

Doctors' manners can affect patient outcomes | Doctor | Scoop.it

'In today's harried medical environment, what doctors and other medical professionals say or don't say to patients may matter more than ever.

 

A recent study done by the University of Michigan Health System that videotaped 18 doctors' interactions with 36 patients, and then interviewed both participants afterward.

 

Overwhelmingly, the patients focused on whether the doc seemed in a rush, made eye contact and listened carefully to what they said.'

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Challenges of using social media for patient feedback

Challenges of using social media for patient feedback | Doctor | Scoop.it

Salma Patel (@salma_patel) writes:

 

'Over the past six months, I have seen first hand the benefits of using social media (in particular Twitter) to interact, engage and build relationships outside of my own professional circle. As a researcher interested in the use of social media in healthcare, I have come across many advocates of social media in healthcare, mainly found on Twitter I must admit, such as the many wonderful contributors to #nhssm (Social Media in the NHS).

 

However, I must say as much as I can see benefits of using social media in healthcare, there are some challenges that need addressing with regards to gathering and elliciting patient feedback using social media'

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A virtual cardiology consultation on World Heart Day

A virtual cardiology consultation on World Heart Day | Doctor | Scoop.it

Dr. Bertalan Meskó (@Berci) writes:

 

'A few weeks ago, I talked about how the first Hungarian virtual cardiology consultation would be organized by Webicina.com and finally it turned out to be a really successful event. We hope to organize even more similar events in many topics'.

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Physicians worry about patient misinformation on the Internet

Physicians worry about patient misinformation on the Internet | Doctor | Scoop.it

'The Internet puts solid health information at a patient's fingertips, but two new studies suggest that too many of those fingertips stray into questionable territory.

 

In a survey from Wolters Kluwer Health, 78% of physicians said that lack of time is one of the most common challenges for physician-patient communication. The next biggest problem in this regard — cited by 53% of physicians — is misinformed patients.

 

The phone survey, conducted in August, included more than 300 US physicians, roughly split between primary care physicians and specialists.'

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The primary care physician and the patient-centered medical home

The primary care physician and the patient-centered medical home | Doctor | Scoop.it

'There is an undercurrent established and ready to carry your patients either away from your practice or toward it. That movement is called the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH).

 

The key to the medical home is this: Medical homes will be driven by a primary care physician who will make the decision where the patient needs to go and whom they will need to see. Outcome measures will be used as data points marking the performance of care within the practice. This performance will be used to determine reimbursement and will also be compared to other practices organized as a medical home.

 

Will this new model save the health care system money? Actually, yes.'

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Mobile device use among nurses increasing

Mobile device use among nurses increasing | Doctor | Scoop.it

'A recent study by Springer Publishing Company discovered that more nurses are using mobile devices including smartphones, tablets and e-Book readers.

 

The report found that 74.6% own a smartphone or tablet, while almost half – 41.5% – own an e-Book reader.

 

However, only 31.4% of these owners said that they have purchased nursing or medical eBooks for their device, compared to a rate of 53.6% for smartphone and tablet users.'

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Why Steve Jobs' magic doesn't work in medicine

Why Steve Jobs' magic doesn't work in medicine | Doctor | Scoop.it

Matthew Herper (@matthewherper) writes:

 

'There’s more here than just the simple lesson that people with cancer should listen to their doctors about getting their tumor cut out, or that you can’t cure cancer with diet or acupuncture, as Jobs apparently hoped he could.

 

The kind of innovation Steve Jobs practiced, probably the type of innovation we mythologize and lionize most since personal computers started changing the fabric of society three decades ago, does not and has not translated to medicine in the same way.'

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Vodafone mHealth Solutions releases first Health Debate publication

Vodafone mHealth Solutions releases first Health Debate publication | Doctor | Scoop.it

“Our aim is to provide some evidence-based stimulus that will encourage all those working in the different areas of healthcare to consider the innovation opportunities that are now available to them,” said Axel Nemetz, Head of Vodafone mHealth Solutions.

 

“We believe that real progress can only be initiated when all stakeholders look beyond traditional horizons and share ideas that challenge the status quo so that together we can identify new ways of addressing current issues.”

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I'm your doctor, not your 'provider'

I'm your doctor, not your 'provider' | Doctor | Scoop.it

Dr. Murray Feingold writes:

 

'Call me old fashioned, but I have always had difficulty calling patients "clients" or "consumers." I also don't like it that the health care system refers to me as a "provider" and not as a doctor.'

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Will Doctors pay for licenses to share content via apps?

Will Doctors pay for licenses to share content via apps? | Doctor | Scoop.it

'Copyright Clearance Center offers iPad-toting doctors a new in-app licensing button for CHEST, a journal read by chest physicians.

 

The button appears as a “get permissions” link at the bottom of the app. Tapping the permissions link calls to rights-licensing options and allows the user to obtain copyright clearance without leaving the app.'

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