Doctor
Follow
Find
27.3K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Andrew Spong
onto Doctor
Scoop.it!

An Uber for healthcare? New app brings docs to your door

An Uber for healthcare? New app brings docs to your door | Doctor | Scoop.it

Taking a hint from on-demand car service Uber, several US companies have developed smartphone apps that bring physicians directly to patients—often for less that it would cost to receive treatment elsewhere.

more...
Art Jones's curator insight, August 11, 2014 10:15 AM

The times they are a changing (for the better)!

From around the web

Doctor
Diagnosing the contemporary healthcare professional's digital habits
Curated by Andrew Spong
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Andrew Spong from Patient
Scoop.it!

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster.

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster. | Doctor | Scoop.it

Click on the link above to contact Andrew Spong, Managing Director, STweM Ltd.

more...
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Swallowing the doctor: nanotechnology in medicine

Swallowing the doctor: nanotechnology in medicine | Doctor | Scoop.it
Advancements in nanotechnology have created robots small enough to enter the human body.
more...
Francisco Rumiche's curator insight, February 4, 5:46 PM

Un ingeniero mecánico y su equipo de trabajo en Suiza  han desarrollado micro y nanorobots, que se mueven mediante el uso de campos magnéticos, con potenciales aplicaciones en medicina y remediacion ambiental.

María Paz's curator insight, February 12, 10:11 AM

Imposible no recordar Un viaje insólito, de Asimov. Los primeros nanobots capaces de recorrer nuestro cuerpo POR DENTRO ya se probaron en el humor vitreo y están listos para ser testeados en seres humanos. 

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

With a 3D printer, doctors get help prepping for complex surgeries

With a 3D printer, doctors get help prepping for complex surgeries | Doctor | Scoop.it

Boston Children's Hospital's ambitious programs to integrate 3D printing technology into medical care with the aim of avoiding surgical complications, reducing the length of operations, and ultimately cutting costs.

more...
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Bioprinting comes alive

Bioprinting comes alive | Doctor | Scoop.it

On the bioprinting of perfusable vasculature tissues that will allow fluids to circulate through blood vessels, and make printed organs a reality

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The quantified self: 85% hype?

The quantified self: 85% hype? | Doctor | Scoop.it
The patient-led, smartphone-based health care revolution is not knocking at the door of practices across America—at least not according to those doctors.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

How swimming micro-robots working in the body as ‘cargo transporters’ could change the face of medicine

How swimming micro-robots working in the body as ‘cargo transporters’ could change the face of medicine | Doctor | Scoop.it

Targeted interventions include:

 

Minimally invasive surgeryTargeted drug deliveryRemote sensingSingle cell manipulation
more...
Senior, Personnes Agées & Silver Economie's curator insight, November 23, 2014 3:49 AM

Une équipe Suisse de l'ETH Zurich y travaille

Art Jones's curator insight, November 23, 2014 9:39 AM

This sounds like the stuff of science fiction but it's not.   We have been making smaller and smaller technologies for a while now, that's why smartphones are so smart, packing the power only available in  room sized computers just a decade or more ago. Thanks to 3D printing we are making even more amazing strides in miniaturization, now it seems all things are possible. 


This excerpt explains what's possible now:

With an additive manufacturing technique, the scientists are able to use a complex method to create the micro-robots, or micro-actuators, which are then coated with biomedical materials. The scientists believe they could increase functionality and deliver medication to targets inside the body.


Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Tablet computers in healthcare settings: novelty or necessity?

Tablet computers in healthcare settings: novelty or necessity? | Doctor | Scoop.it

As things currently stands, tablet computers are more than a novelty but are not as yet a necessity. Tablets are useful for data retrieval during ward rounds but their use as a tool to engage patients in the care process remains limited. Individual health professionals or organisations contemplating the introduction of mHealth are advised to speak to their IT department prior to purchasing tablet computers to understand their local clinical information systems requirements (e.g., operating system compatibility) and any limitations associated with translating the systems to smaller devices. Such considerations are critical if tablet computers are to deliver on their full potential.

 

more...
Bart Collet's comment, November 7, 2014 5:24 AM
deploying task assignment and -registration via tablets as we speak :)
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

"Meaningfully engaging patients and families as true partners in their care remains the exception, not the rule"

"Meaningfully engaging patients and families as true partners in their care remains the exception, not the rule" | Doctor | Scoop.it
more...
Art Jones's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:49 PM

If patient engagement is the wonder drug of the 21st century why are we having such a hard time engaging?

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Using digital strategies to promote health equity

Using digital strategies to promote health equity | Doctor | Scoop.it
Without addressing issues such as access, effectiveness and health literacy, implementing health and health care strategies that depend on digital technologies run a significant risk of increasing health disparities
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Philips and Radboud university medical center debut wearable diagnostic prototype for chronic illness

Philips and Radboud university medical center debut wearable diagnostic prototype for chronic illness | Doctor | Scoop.it

Philips and Radboud university medical center have announced the debut of a prototype to support patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

 

Management of COPD is challenging and often costly, as the progressive nature of the disease leads many patients to require complicated therapies and frequent hospital readmissions. At the same time, consumers are increasingly looking for new ways to take control of their personal health in order to live healthier and better lives.

 

"Unlike other wearable solutions recently introduced to the market, this prototype collects more than just wellness data from otherwise healthy people," said Jeroen Tas, CEO, Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services, Philips. "We are demonstrating the power of harnessing both clinical and personal health information to better manage chronic disease patients across the health continuum, from healthy living, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, recovery and home care."

 

The wearable diagnostic prototype for COPD patients feeds data collected from patients at home to clinicians through the PhilipsHealthSuite Digital Platform to two clinical applications currently available on the cloud-based platform – eCareCompanion and eCareCoordinator. Once a COPD patient has left the hospital, a wearable diagnostic prototype collects data day and night – including physical activity/inactivity, respiratory indicator, heart rhythm and heart rate variability.

 

That data is then sent via the cloud to the Philips HealthSuite Digital Platform, where it is shared with the appropriate care providers via the eCareCoordinator application, presenting a more complete view of the patient's illness

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Doctors remain skeptical of Apple's HealthKit

Doctors remain skeptical of Apple's HealthKit | Doctor | Scoop.it

Data accuracy is a concern: patient generated data has traditionally been self-reporting, which means it isn't always accurate or complete. The second issue is a concern about the accuracy of the devices used to record that data. Doctors and nurses trust certain device brands and sometimes discourage patients from selecting a device from another company, particularly new companies. Both of these can be serious concerns and are valid.

 

Another concern is that while there's a significant value to monitoring metrics for people with certain conditions, particularly chronic health problems like heart disease, diabetes, and COPD, tracking a huge range of metrics for people that are essentially healthy could load too much unneeded data into a person's health record. This seems to be a particular concern for primary care physicians, who are generally ranked as the most overworked doctors in the country.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Surgical social media: the physician-patient connection

Surgical social media: the physician-patient connection | Doctor | Scoop.it

Healthcare should consider social media as a way to better inform patients of procedure and treatment risks, and to streamline efficiencies across doctor-patient communications.

 

Although surgeons already are using the technology to communicate with one another, driving equity of care in the process, we're only just beginning to glimpse social media's potential as a meaningful communications channel linking patient and physician.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The present state and future implications of patient-specific 3D printing

The present state and future implications of patient-specific 3D printing | Doctor | Scoop.it

First results from the application of 3D models in clinical practice confirm the expectations for additive manufactured models in the medical field.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Exploring eight of Google's interventions in health

Exploring eight of Google's interventions in health | Doctor | Scoop.it
Google is moving into digital health perhaps more than you think.
more...
Service communication's curator insight, February 3, 9:03 AM

Les innovations de Google dans l'e-santé

Google's innovations about e-health

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

E-patients deserve e-doctors: addressing the needs of both to make healthcare better for all

E-patients deserve e-doctors: addressing the needs of both to make healthcare better for all | Doctor | Scoop.it

Matthew Katz, MD (@subatomicdoc) writes:

 

"We are all dissatisfied with an unhealthy health care system in a rapidly changing world. Empowering patients and doctors ensures they can work together. New technologies and tests are not solutions, they’re just tools. If patients and doctors don’t stand up for themselves, other stakeholders  (e.g. hospitals, insurers, industry)may unwittingly make things worse.


Thoughtful, vocal patients, caregivers and doctors should stand together. Even when we disagree, we can respect our differences while working toward solutions, both in clinic and for the health care system.

 

We both have a lot to bring to the table. Empowered patients are better able to collaborate. Empowered doctors are more able to adapt to each patients needs and communicate well to build trust. We need each other. And if we support each other, the entire health care system will be the better for it."

Andrew Spong's insight:

The best thing I've read this year, for sure. Nicely done, Matthew.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Wearable sensor clears path to long-term EKG, EMG monitoring

Wearable sensor clears path to long-term EKG, EMG monitoring | Doctor | Scoop.it

A new electrophysiological sensor developed at North Carolina State University is as accurate as the 'wet electrode' sensors used in hospitals for EKGs and EMGs, but can be used for long-term monitoring and is more accurate than existing sensors when a patient is moving. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

The promise of medical 3D priniting

The promise of medical 3D priniting | Doctor | Scoop.it
3D printing will have a transformative and revolutionary impact on the medical industry. We have already witnessed huge leaps in prosthetics and bioprinting, but the next few years will reveal the true power of 3D printing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

3D printing a 'lab on a chip'

3D printing a 'lab on a chip' | Doctor | Scoop.it

A 'lab on a chip' can theoretically take a minuscule sample of blood, run all of the required tests at once inside tiny channels embedded in the chip, and produce nearly instantaneous results.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Patients embrace sharing doctors' notes with family and caregivers

Patients embrace sharing doctors' notes with family and caregivers | Doctor | Scoop.it

Patients increasingly are using technology to share their health information with family or friends, and access to information is causing them to pay better attention to their care, according to a recent study.

 

Published this week in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, the research looked at patient use of OpenNotes, initially a one-year program that gave patients electronic access to medical notes written by their doctors.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Connected health is progressing, but obstacles remain (and some of them are doctors)

Connected health is progressing, but obstacles remain (and some of them are doctors) | Doctor | Scoop.it

Technological developments in the health care sector hold great promise for delivering a better standard of care in the United States. But just because you build it doesn’t mean they will come. Doctors, that is.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Healthcare professional reticence can have as much to do with concerns about patient safety as it can with personal skepticism.

 

Let's remember that the personalised medicine agenda extends to doctors, too. Many doctors do an outstanding job in terms of delivering exceptional care and supporting optimal patient outcomes without a battery of gizmos and gadgets.

 

Push through the legions of techno-zombies and wild-eyed advocates, and find the solution that works for you, in whatever combination of digital and analog forms, in tandem with your care team.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Will patient-generated data from HealthKit reshape the EMR?

Will patient-generated data from HealthKit reshape the EMR? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Some industry stakeholders from providers to investors to consumer device makers think something like Apple’s HealthKit could be the catalyst that finally brings the patient — and patient-generated data — into the healthcare ecosystem in a way that electronic medical records have persistently failed to do.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Whilst I think the general theme delineated here -- consumer-collated, interoperable, personalised health data redefining what the 'electronic health record' is, and toppling legacy providers -- is germane, from what we know of HealthKit so far it seems unlikely to be the sort of epoch-defining release that the article's title suggests.

 

However, if Google were to acquire a company like Withings and integrate its products into Android...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Doctors of data: ethics, law, and the electronic medical record

Doctors of data: ethics, law, and the electronic medical record | Doctor | Scoop.it
The convergence of life sciences and technology promises significant gains for public health, but are ethics and law ready for the consequences?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Figure 1: a new clinical image sharing platform for doctors only

Figure 1: a new clinical image sharing platform for doctors only | Doctor | Scoop.it

An app which enables healthcare professionals to share photos is to be rolled out across western Europe by the end of the year.

 

The app was designed to enable doctors to share pictures of their patients, both with each other and with medical students.

 

So far, more than 150,000 doctors have uploaded case photos with the patient's identity obscured.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Not having access to this platform (for very good reasons) I can't comment on its functionality.

 

There are pros and cons to any image sharing resource, but my first question is: what is Figure 1's business model?

 

As the app is free, and I don't see any premium subscription product, does this mean anonymised data about clinician interests and behaviours is being sold to third parties?

 

On the plus side, I like the fact that Figure 1 is in keeping with the emerging interest in clinicians in #FOAMed-like peer-sourced medical education rather than legacy CME, which is looking less and less relevant.

 

The observation Dr. Landy makes in this piece about existing clinical decision support tools being 'highly curated repositories of articles written and edited by experts' is a polite way of saying that clinicians are increasingly uncomfortable with anything resembling 'eminence based medicine' which is not open to critique or emendation.

 

On the negative side, any clinical image-sharing platform is going to run up against the limitations of its own functionality when users wish, for example, to consider aspects of the clinical implications of the image against the fuller history of a patient's EHR.

 

Perhaps Figure 1 is looking to present itself as a modular solution which could be acquired by and integrated into one of the leading EHR's? Who knows.

 

I have broader concerns about consent, anonymity, verification, and abuse, but these would of course apply to any similar tool as well. Some of the language in the FAQ accessible from Figure 1's Twitter URL isn't as robust as I personally would have liked it to be.

 

It will be interesting to see what happens next.

more...
Marc Senterre's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:38 PM

Things are moving fast !

Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Philips rolls out health applications for chronic care management at home

Philips rolls out health applications for chronic care management at home | Doctor | Scoop.it

Part of Philips Hospital to Home’s suite of telehealth programs, eCareCoordinator and eCareCompanion, received USDA’s 510(k) clearance, are focused on patient care within the home and the first clinical applications to be available through the cloud-based digital health platform.

 

The application gives clinicians real-time access to both objective health data – like vital signs, blood pressure and weight — as well as subjective responses collected via health questionnaires and other communication with the care team about the patient’s status.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew Spong
Scoop.it!

Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson to optimise pairing of patients with clinical trials

Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson to optimise pairing of patients with clinical trials | Doctor | Scoop.it
Mayo hopes to speed up clinical trial timelines and increase participation with the help of the cognitive computer. 
more...
No comment yet.