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Social media has already changed the healthcare landscape irrevocably

Social media has already changed the healthcare landscape irrevocably | Doctor | Scoop.it

As patients increasingly turn toward social media to access healthcare and self-diagnose, the patient-provider relationship is changing, the book argues. The first step in this change came when patients gained access to medical information online. Now they're adding the power of crowd sourcing, which means the healthcare industry isn't just seeing a more educated patient but also patients interpreting information and, essentially, becoming a member of their healthcare team.

 

"Patients are becoming our colleagues," said co-author of 'Social Media For Nurses' Ramona Nelson. "It's changing relationships and the kinds of questions and services a patient asks for."

 

With healthcare becoming increasingly virtual, said Wolf, it's becoming the provider's responsibility to direct patients to the best online resources.

Looking ahead, Wolf advises that nurses and practitioners need to incorporate social media into a strategic plan to determine how they're going to use different platforms and extend services through them. This plan, she said, should be created from a clinical perspective as well as an IT perspective, allowing for an interdisciplinary approach.

 

"Clinicians in services may not understand websites or synchronized information versus unsynchronized information," she said. "They need help to get them out there virtually."

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rob halkes's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:18 AM

Surely socia media do have changed health care and patients' care for their proper health. But I guess, it is still at the outside realms of the interactive care process itself: not directly to the interaction and communication wtihtin the care process itself!

Indeed, for some, attitutes of patients (informed empowerment) have been developed. Attitudes of physicians and other caregivers might also have been influenced, for some. But how to use social media to reconstruct the very caring process itself so as to create a more open and direct shared decision making between patients and hs caregivers? Theres is a lot to be learned and reserached still.BUt as you can read in this blog, resp. book, you will see that we go onwards, not backwards, for sure. ;-)

 

Sven Awege's comment, January 31, 2013 2:13 AM
We're all patients or caregivers, and some of us are pushing very hard, asking for much better service and taking responsibility about our health. We will prevail!
rob halkes's comment, January 31, 2013 2:55 AM
Indeed Sven, that's my spirit! SO, let's make it happen! ;-)
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Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster.

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster. | Doctor | Scoop.it

Click on the link above to contact Andrew Spong, Managing Director, STweM Ltd.

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Fakebetes HCP challenge: the new nurse

Fakebetes HCP challenge: the new nurse | Doctor | Scoop.it

As a healthcare provider without diabetes, I will never fully understand what it is like to live with diabetes. I do however try my best to understand the day-to-day challenges as best as I can. I have tested my own blood sugars, worn all the insulin pumps and CGM devices, taken saline injections, etc.; I also engage in the DOC (diabetes online community).

 

To try to encourage other healthcare providers to gain better perspective on diabetes, I worked with members of the DOC to set-up a fakebetes challenge. Whitney, a new nursing graduate, and Kim Vlasnik both volunteered to be first to take this challenge, and were paired together.

 

In this fakebetes challenge, Kim text Whitney fake insulin doses, including a carb ratio and correction factor; and blood sugar readings from her own glucometer. Whitney was encouraged to check her own blood sugars and count carbohydrates, but take saline injections according to the blood sugars Kim had text text her. In this way there would be some blood sugar readings in different ranges to think about and respond to.

Andrew Spong's insight:

I'd be really interested to hear what the DOC thought of this initiative.

 

I'm conflicted, to be honest. On the one hand, I very much admire the commitment of the healthcare professionals involved to immerse themselves as fully as possible in the experience of living with diabetes.

 

However, in the last instance that does not extend beyond the routines involved with optimal management.

 

Also, for fear of stating the obvious, it can never take the provider inside the body and mind of a person living with diabetes to afford them first-hand experience of the multi-factorial inconveniences, physical discomforts and pain, and mental challenges of the disease.

 

Most significantly, their pancreas is still working. PWD don't have the option to stop being diabetic.

 

If this sounds more anti than pro, I don't mean it to -- there is simply a weight of things to say regarding the former.

 

Perhaps for people with diabetes, the gestural demonstration of wanting to understand what living with the disease is like to the best of the RN's ability is what they may consider most important.

 

I'd like to hear more, so please share any responses to this study that you may have seen from the DOC. Thanks!

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Smartphone app alerts doctor when patient exhibits symptoms

Smartphone app alerts doctor when patient exhibits symptoms | Doctor | Scoop.it
MIT researchers developed an app, Ginger.io, that collects data about its users behaviors, locations, health conditions and habits and then notes inconsistencies that may predict the onset of problems such as depression. The app alerts health care providers for intervention.
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The doctor will Skype you now: is e-consulting a good idea?

The doctor will Skype you now: is e-consulting a good idea? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Electronic consultation systems use the Internet to deliver health services to people all around the world and has been shown to reduce unnecessary visits to specialists, with a meaningful percentage of cases being resolved without a face-to-face visit. As a result, wait times are less for those who really do need to see a specialist. Skype is one method that is popular among health-care providers today. 

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LinkedIn, HCP communities and facebook matter most to the 56% of clinicians who use social professionally

LinkedIn, HCP communities and facebook matter most to the 56% of clinicians who use social professionally | Doctor | Scoop.it

When it comes to social media, the top sites that doctors do seem to use for work are LinkedIn, online physician communities, and Facebook (see chart below). The specialities that reported the most use of online physician communities were ophthalmology, geriatrics, psychiatry, otolaryngology, and oncology.

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Surgeons who use 3D printing to help explain patients’ conditions to them

Surgeons who use 3D printing to help explain patients’ conditions to them | Doctor | Scoop.it

Bioprinting continues to make significant strides towards a process that will involve dispensing cells onto biocompatible scaffolding using successive layers to generate tissue-like 3D structures and organs.

 

Along the way, however, there will be a number of interim steps that can also benefit the healthcare community. An excellent example of this is highlighted in a new study Physical Models of Renal Malignancies Using Standard Cross-Sectional Imaging and 3-Dimensional Printers: A Pilot Study.

 

The authors of the study, who work in theDepartment of Urology at Tulane University School of Medicine; were looking for a method of providing 3-dimensional models of patient’s kidneys based on cross-sectional imaging. According to Jonathan Silberstein, Assistant Professor of Urology, providing such a model “may aid patients, trainees, and clinicians in their comprehension, characterization, localization, and extirpation of suspicious renal masses.”

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Bettina Gifford's curator insight, July 18, 1:21 PM

Really interesting use of 3D printing

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Mount Sinai's Patient Itinerary app recognises that being organised and informed supports good outcomes

Mount Sinai's Patient Itinerary app recognises that being organised and informed supports good outcomes | Doctor | Scoop.it

A new “Patient Itinerary” app now gives patients at The Mount Sinai Hospital a detailed schedule of upcoming treatments, procedures and tests.

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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, July 4, 6:23 AM

This is brilliant! A pure WIN/WIN!

Time saved for hospital staff and visibility/transparency for patient.

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We don’t need no FOAM Curriculum

We don’t need no FOAM Curriculum | Doctor | Scoop.it
Amid enthusiastic discussion (at opposite ends of the earth) of the need for a FOAM curriculum, I say no. Read on to find out why.
Andrew Spong's insight:

Only just stumbled across this eloquent exposition from 2013 of why #FOAMed is dismantling the idea of the curriculum in medical education.

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Frederic Llordachs: “We’re returning to the health care model where the patient received all care at home”

Frederic Llordachs: “We’re returning to the health care model where the patient received all care at home” | Doctor | Scoop.it
Frederic Llordachs is what is called a health care and well being entrepreneur. He recognized the potential of the Internet in his field right away, and he admits that many colleagues didn’t take his initiative seriously at first. Currently, Doctoralia, of which Llordach is a founding partner, has more than 2 million users monthly and has a network of more than 73,000 medical professionals. Does the health care system as we know it have an expiration date?
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The top 20 healthcare app categories, ranked by number of apps available

Mobile phone technologies have evolved to handle increasingly complex tasks. While the majority of apps are designed for simple tasks, some of the more sophisticated ones can handle high resolution imaging, real-time monitoring and other advanced functions.


Based on functional complexity, vision care apps lead the market, followed by medical sensors and specialised apps for patients with psoriasis, cardiovascular conditions, cancer support, apps for medical reference, baby care and others.

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Samsung introduces Simband modular health band powered by open source SAMI platform

Samsung introduces Simband modular health band powered by open source SAMI platform | Doctor | Scoop.it

At a “Voice of the Body” event today in San Francisco, Samsung president and chief strategy officer Young Sohn announced the company’s vision of an open health-sensor platform. That vision results in the Simband modular wrist band.

 

The demonstration Simband device shown at the event showed vitals in real-time. The wrist band uses light sensors and bio impedance sensors to measure your body. The information tracked is shared with the SAMI cloud network. The entire system is open to developers and modular.

 
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Nano-electronics research centre Imec and Samsung join to accelerate innovation in digital health

Imec, the world-leading nano-electronics research centre announced today that it is collaborating with Samsung Electronics to accelerate innovation and collaboration among technology companies and researchers working in the burgeoning mobile wearable field.

 

The announcement comes as part of Samsung's recently announced digital health initiative, which aims to facilitate the development of wearable sensors that can help users gain new insights into their own wellness and enable them to live healthier lives. A centerpiece of the announcement is Samsung's Simband platform, which includes an open reference sensor module integrating the industry's most advanced sensing technologies from Imec.

 

The sensor array promises to bring a new understanding of the body's inner workings to the world of consumer health monitoring. 

Andrew Spong's insight:

This announcement sounds like a step forward, and makes Apple's HealthKit fluff look more and more like an exercise in chair-moving.

 

The Simband platform will take digital health a step towards a NIAP (non-invasive, all-pervasive) sensor-driven healthcare future based on prevention rather than treatment.

 

The notion of quantifying our health can be no more than a hobbyist indulgence for a minute and privileged subsection of the population until this point is reached.

 

And this creation of the conditions of possibility for informed health self-management is where we need to be if our future healthcare offering is going to be sustainable.

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Wax Sativa's curator insight, June 8, 8:29 AM

no more hiv aid,cancer,epilepsy,pain and trauma

our research our %100 guarantee

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ASCO highlights oncology clinician Twitter users, and the hashtags they favour

ASCO highlights oncology clinician Twitter users, and the hashtags they favour | Doctor | Scoop.it
Andrew Spong's insight:

This is the first time I've seen something like this.

 

I think ASCO have got it right straight out of the blocks, and offer a model of best practice with regard to how best to promote clinical conversation around their congress inside and outside the convention centre.

 

Next up will be a companion patient opinion leader infographic, I hope :)

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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, May 30, 2:54 AM

do you like twitter congresses?

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Personalised medicine for kids: 3D printing's pediatric possibilities

Personalised medicine for kids: 3D printing's pediatric possibilities | Doctor | Scoop.it
3D Pediatrics is taking part in DreamIt Ventures' Open Canvas@CHOP. It wants to use 3D printing technology to provide customized medical devices for kids.
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81% of HCPs want more direct connection between CME and patient health outcomes

81% of HCPs want more direct connection between CME and patient health outcomes | Doctor | Scoop.it

When asked whether users would like to see a more direct connection between the CME they take and patient outcomes, eighty-one percent of HCPs surveyed responded affirmatively.

 

Seventy-eight percent of respondents said "yes" when asked whether CME delivered at the point of care (in the form of decision support) could lend valuable insights into the management of patients.

 

The survey also found that less than one percent of respondents currently consume CME through an EHR system, demonstrating a significant unmet need in the marketplace for new approaches to CME delivery.

 

 

Andrew Spong's insight:

What did the other 19 percent want? <boggle>

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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, July 24, 4:41 AM
EHR Electronic Health Records
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Smartphones: the new stethoscopes

Smartphones: the new stethoscopes | Doctor | Scoop.it

Among the many instruments your doctor uses — stethoscope, thermometer, scale — the most valuable one may be in her pocket: a smartphone.   Due to increasingly compressed office visits, patients are becoming more active participants in managing their healthcare, and a new generation of Internet-savvy physicians is using social media to improve the way they run their practices. Currently, 67 percent of physicians use social media — sites like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Pinterest — for professional purposes, according to a recent report released by the Federation of State Medical Boards. One Yahoo Facebook user reported that her nurse practitioner gives advice over the social networking site, while another said sharing photos and videos can even save her a trip to the office.   “Social media is changing the way people give and receive information and, as a result, the medical profession is changing, too,” Lee Aase, social media director at the Mayo Clinic, tells Yahoo Health.

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Survey: 80% of smartphone users would like to use their devices to interact with HCPs

Survey: 80% of smartphone users would like to use their devices to interact with HCPs | Doctor | Scoop.it

A survey (n=2,239) of smartphone users across geographies found that:

 

* 71% of smartphone users are open to offers of relevant health care services from businesses

* 80% of patients would like the option to use their smartphones to interact with health care providers

* 56% of people worldwide trust health care organisations with personal data and indicated that while e-health records have yet to take off in many countries, innovations around mobile alerts and information services are helping build trust

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Marcus Healey's curator insight, July 15, 1:24 PM

The impending m-health revolution is in its infancy, but coming sooner than planned?

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3D printing the human circulatory system

3D printing the human circulatory system | Doctor | Scoop.it

From skin to guns to customisable phone covers to mini-robots, the capacities of 3D printing are widening all the time.

Now, in a development that could have big implications in the transplant field, scientists have figured out how to print a circulatory system which is vital to keeping tissue alive.

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What can oncologists learn from social media?

What can oncologists learn from social media? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Dr. Matthew Katz (@subatomicdoc) describes how he uses social media to learn more about patient perceptions of cancer, how to decide which social media to use, and drawbacks to using social media in a professional capacity.

Andrew Spong's insight:

One of my long-time, trusted clinical voices in oncology shares his insights in this video.

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Who will win the health app race?

Who will win the health app race? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Apple debuted HealthKit at its Worldwide Developers Conference and Google followed a few weeks later with GoogleFit at its I/O conference.

 

It is clear that Apple and Google see health apps as a major feature for future iPhones, iPads and Android devices. Where this gets interesting is how the two companies will vie for supremacy and where they identify their best marketplace opportunities...

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Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices

Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices | Doctor | Scoop.it

Eighty percent of smartphone users are interested in using their smartphones to interact with health care providers, according to a FICO survey of 2,239 adult smartphone users from the UK, Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, and the United States.

The survey analyzed how consumers prefer to interact with health care providers on mobile devices, online and in-person.


Via Alex Butler
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Helen Adams's curator insight, July 3, 1:22 AM

Now that depends on what they mean by "interact", are they meaning consultation with their HCP or accessing test results and repeat prescriptions.

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Amazon Fire Phone's array of sensors could make it an attractive health platform

Amazon Fire Phone's array of sensors could make it an attractive health platform | Doctor | Scoop.it
Sensors on the Amazon Fire Phone could be a boon for mobile health apps that involve physical therapy, scanning the eyes and face and therapeutic gaming.
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Digital health: from sensors to data fusion (video)

Digital health: from sensors to data fusion (video) | Doctor | Scoop.it

All grit, no fluff. One of the best digital healthcare surveys I've seen from the University of Oxford's Lionel Tarrasenko.

 

Note the emphasis on non-invasive sensors in digital health and data fusion in analytics.

 

If you only watch one digital health video this year, make it this one.

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Apple's WWDC14 footshot raises clinician questions about validation of HealthKit's utility

Apple's WWDC14 footshot raises clinician questions about validation of HealthKit's utility | Doctor | Scoop.it

Yesterday at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference, an image flashed up on the screen behind VP of Software Engineering Craig Federighi. It was a screen shot from Apple’s new Health app (or a mockup thereof), showing a user’s blood glucose level.

 

But Apple biffed the measurement for blood glucose level, as Aaron Rowe of biochemical sampling device maker Integrated Plasmonics pointed out. It’s measured in mg/dL. Apple’s slide said “mL/dL.”

 

“It will be really important for companies to justify their interpretations of the information they provide to achieve physician buy in,” said Dr. Molly Maloof, a San Francisco Bay Area clinical physician focused on health optimization. “Otherwise, these consumer-focused devices will be written off as health toys rather than health tools.”


“I personally feel they should have an entire team of clinical researchers and medical doctors on their staff rather than just device experts because what they need is clinical validation that the tool is useful,” Dr. Maloof says.

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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, June 5, 4:18 AM

“I personally feel they should have an entire team of clinical researchers and medical doctors on their staff rather than just device experts because what they need is clinical validation that the tool is useful,” Dr. Maloof says"

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Survey: more than a third of physicians had recommended that patients use health apps in the past year

Survey: more than a third of physicians had recommended that patients use health apps in the past year | Doctor | Scoop.it

From Manhattan Research's 'Taking the Pulse U.S. 2014' study: 

 

* Forty-seven percent of physician smartphone owners had shown patients images or videos on their devices,

* More than a third of physicians had recommended that patients use health apps in the past year.

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Clinician, patient, and family social media pioneers in UK health

Andrew Spong's insight:

This is great piece of work that serves to define the utility of social media in a healthcare setting, spotlight expert practitioners, and offer advice and encouragement to new entrants all at once.

 

Grab this free PDF right now.

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rob halkes's curator insight, May 28, 10:02 AM

Great to see the original pioneers in the UK ;-)

Denise Silber's curator insight, May 28, 3:37 PM

I just scooped this from @andrewspong Come meet him in Paris at Doctors 2.0 & You June 5-6