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Is the future of health beyond our imagination?

Is the future of health beyond our imagination? | Doctor | Scoop.it

In 2012 the World Economic Forum engaged more than 200 high-level decision-makers from the public sector and a broad range of private sector organizations in workshops and interviews. In each case participants discussed the uncertainties that might reshape the context in which health systems form and operate. Six uncertainties were identified as critical:

Attitudes towards solidarity:Will solidarity – the willingness of individuals to share the population’s health risks – increase, decrease or be conditional upon certain factors?Origins of governance: Will power and authority be predominantly located at the national, supranational or local level?Organization of the health innovation system: Will innovation come from within or outside the existing system? What will be the level of funding? What will be the types of innovation produced?Access to health information: Who will take responsibility for collecting and analysing health data? Will people give their consent for their personal data to be used?Influence over lifestyles: To what degree will active influence over individual lifestyles be accepted and implemented?Health culture: Will healthy living be a minority choice, a civic duty or an aspiration?

These critical uncertainties show us that health systems of the future can, and will, be very different from what we think of as healthcare today. The World Economic Forum’s new report, Sustainable Health Systems: Visions, Strategies and Scenarios, explores three ways in which these uncertainties could shape health systems in the future.

 

In Health Incorporated, the boundaries of the health industry are redefined. Corporations provide new products and services as markets liberalize, governments cut back on public services and a new sense of conditional solidarity emerges.

 

In New Social Contract, governments are responsible for driving health-system efficiency and for regulating organizations and individuals to pursue healthy living.

 

In Super-empowered Individuals, citizens use an array of products and services to manage their own health. Meanwhile, corporations compete for this lucrative market and governments try to address the consequences.

 

The ways we promote and deliver health services and outcomes in society today are unsustainable and will have to change. Health can no longer be thought of in terms of healthcare alone. The scenarios show us that the future of health lies less in a new magic pill and more in a shift in how we understand and strive for health in society. Health is created beyond the confines of hospital walls and doctors’ offices. It is being created in the places we work, the products we buy and (increasingly) the cities we live in.

 

The report shows that new visions for sustainable health systems can be achieved when actors from across government ministries, industries and civil society come together prepared to test their most central assumptions.

Despite their best efforts and resources, world leaders can’t predict or forecast exactly what the future will hold, but by being open to all the possibilities and challenging business-as-usual mindsets they can make better decisions today – decisions that will guide us towards a healthier future.

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Diagnosing the contemporary healthcare professional's digital habits
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Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster.

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster. | Doctor | Scoop.it

Click on the link above to contact Andrew Spong, Managing Director, STweM Ltd.

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3D printing a 'lab on a chip'

3D printing a 'lab on a chip' | Doctor | Scoop.it

A 'lab on a chip' can theoretically take a minuscule sample of blood, run all of the required tests at once inside tiny channels embedded in the chip, and produce nearly instantaneous results.

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Patients embrace sharing doctors' notes with family and caregivers

Patients embrace sharing doctors' notes with family and caregivers | Doctor | Scoop.it

Patients increasingly are using technology to share their health information with family or friends, and access to information is causing them to pay better attention to their care, according to a recent study.

 

Published this week in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, the research looked at patient use of OpenNotes, initially a one-year program that gave patients electronic access to medical notes written by their doctors.  

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Connected health is progressing, but obstacles remain (and some of them are doctors)

Connected health is progressing, but obstacles remain (and some of them are doctors) | Doctor | Scoop.it

Technological developments in the health care sector hold great promise for delivering a better standard of care in the United States. But just because you build it doesn’t mean they will come. Doctors, that is.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Healthcare professional reticence can have as much to do with concerns about patient safety as it can with personal skepticism.

 

Let's remember that the personalised medicine agenda extends to doctors, too. Many doctors do an outstanding job in terms of delivering exceptional care and supporting optimal patient outcomes without a battery of gizmos and gadgets.

 

Push through the legions of techno-zombies and wild-eyed advocates, and find the solution that works for you, in whatever combination of digital and analog forms, in tandem with your care team.

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Will patient-generated data from HealthKit reshape the EMR?

Will patient-generated data from HealthKit reshape the EMR? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Some industry stakeholders from providers to investors to consumer device makers think something like Apple’s HealthKit could be the catalyst that finally brings the patient — and patient-generated data — into the healthcare ecosystem in a way that electronic medical records have persistently failed to do.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Whilst I think the general theme delineated here -- consumer-collated, interoperable, personalised health data redefining what the 'electronic health record' is, and toppling legacy providers -- is germane, from what we know of HealthKit so far it seems unlikely to be the sort of epoch-defining release that the article's title suggests.

 

However, if Google were to acquire a company like Withings and integrate its products into Android...

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Doctors of data: ethics, law, and the electronic medical record

Doctors of data: ethics, law, and the electronic medical record | Doctor | Scoop.it
The convergence of life sciences and technology promises significant gains for public health, but are ethics and law ready for the consequences?
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Figure 1: a new clinical image sharing platform for doctors only

Figure 1: a new clinical image sharing platform for doctors only | Doctor | Scoop.it

An app which enables healthcare professionals to share photos is to be rolled out across western Europe by the end of the year.

 

The app was designed to enable doctors to share pictures of their patients, both with each other and with medical students.

 

So far, more than 150,000 doctors have uploaded case photos with the patient's identity obscured.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Not having access to this platform (for very good reasons) I can't comment on its functionality.

 

There are pros and cons to any image sharing resource, but my first question is: what is Figure 1's business model?

 

As the app is free, and I don't see any premium subscription product, does this mean anonymised data about clinician interests and behaviours is being sold to third parties?

 

On the plus side, I like the fact that Figure 1 is in keeping with the emerging interest in clinicians in #FOAMed-like peer-sourced medical education rather than legacy CME, which is looking less and less relevant.

 

The observation Dr. Landy makes in this piece about existing clinical decision support tools being 'highly curated repositories of articles written and edited by experts' is a polite way of saying that clinicians are increasingly uncomfortable with anything resembling 'eminence based medicine' which is not open to critique or emendation.

 

On the negative side, any clinical image-sharing platform is going to run up against the limitations of its own functionality when users wish, for example, to consider aspects of the clinical implications of the image against the fuller history of a patient's EHR.

 

Perhaps Figure 1 is looking to present itself as a modular solution which could be acquired by and integrated into one of the leading EHR's? Who knows.

 

I have broader concerns about consent, anonymity, verification, and abuse, but these would of course apply to any similar tool as well. Some of the language in the FAQ accessible from Figure 1's Twitter URL isn't as robust as I personally would have liked it to be.

 

It will be interesting to see what happens next.

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Marc Senterre's curator insight, October 14, 4:38 PM

Things are moving fast !

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Philips rolls out health applications for chronic care management at home

Philips rolls out health applications for chronic care management at home | Doctor | Scoop.it

Part of Philips Hospital to Home’s suite of telehealth programs, eCareCoordinator and eCareCompanion, received USDA’s 510(k) clearance, are focused on patient care within the home and the first clinical applications to be available through the cloud-based digital health platform.

 

The application gives clinicians real-time access to both objective health data – like vital signs, blood pressure and weight — as well as subjective responses collected via health questionnaires and other communication with the care team about the patient’s status.

 

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Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson to optimise pairing of patients with clinical trials

Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson to optimise pairing of patients with clinical trials | Doctor | Scoop.it
Mayo hopes to speed up clinical trial timelines and increase participation with the help of the cognitive computer. 
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Virtual therapy sessions make mental health care more widely available

Virtual therapy sessions make mental health care more widely available | Doctor | Scoop.it
The mental health field is perhaps uniquely suited to transition from face-to-face meetings to online appointments. Despite hurdles related to insurance reimbursement and concerns about whether an interpersonal connection can survive in the virtual world, proponents say that online therapy is an effective solution to bring mental health care to those who might not otherwise get it.
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Why doctors want the FDA to regulate health and fitness apps

Why doctors want the FDA to regulate health and fitness apps | Doctor | Scoop.it
Technology is shaping the future of healthcare, and while technology has brought a number of innovative healthcare solutions, some are worried about the growing impact and potential danger of unregulated health IT apps. Plenty of health and fitness apps in the Apple App Store and Google Play range from harmless to helpful, but doctors are worried about untested and unregulated apps that claim to replace medical devices or diagnose illnesses. Doctors are now asking the FDA to take notice and are warning the public to evaluate these apps with a critical eye.
Andrew Spong's insight:

This. Will. Never. Happen...

 

...for reasons of resourcing alone.

 

However, once they're settled their first class action against a health app, I can still see Apple and Google hiring massive clinical faculties to assure the quality of apps in house.

 

For health app makers, the era of low-to-no scrutiny will soon be over.

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Joel Finkle's curator insight, August 7, 9:52 AM

Sensible - doctors don't want apps that are inaccurate leading to poor choices on patients' part.

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How the demands of healthcare delivery are superseding the privacy debate

How the demands of healthcare delivery are superseding the privacy debate | Doctor | Scoop.it

Technology has the ability to reduce the cost of delivering healthcare, and can be utilised effectively in order to reduce the personal and economic burden of care in single-payer healthcare systems.

 

It’s just a shame that this has had to be pointed out 50 million times in the UK, at untold cost to patients and their families.

 

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Fakebetes HCP challenge: the new nurse

Fakebetes HCP challenge: the new nurse | Doctor | Scoop.it

As a healthcare provider without diabetes, I will never fully understand what it is like to live with diabetes. I do however try my best to understand the day-to-day challenges as best as I can. I have tested my own blood sugars, worn all the insulin pumps and CGM devices, taken saline injections, etc.; I also engage in the DOC (diabetes online community).

 

To try to encourage other healthcare providers to gain better perspective on diabetes, I worked with members of the DOC to set-up a fakebetes challenge. Whitney, a new nursing graduate, and Kim Vlasnik both volunteered to be first to take this challenge, and were paired together.

 

In this fakebetes challenge, Kim text Whitney fake insulin doses, including a carb ratio and correction factor; and blood sugar readings from her own glucometer. Whitney was encouraged to check her own blood sugars and count carbohydrates, but take saline injections according to the blood sugars Kim had text text her. In this way there would be some blood sugar readings in different ranges to think about and respond to.

Andrew Spong's insight:

I'd be really interested to hear what the DOC thought of this initiative.

 

I'm conflicted, to be honest. On the one hand, I very much admire the commitment of the healthcare professionals involved to immerse themselves as fully as possible in the experience of living with diabetes.

 

However, in the last instance that does not extend beyond the routines involved with optimal management.

 

Also, for fear of stating the obvious, it can never take the provider inside the body and mind of a person living with diabetes to afford them first-hand experience of the multi-factorial inconveniences, physical discomforts and pain, and mental challenges of the disease.

 

Most significantly, their pancreas is still working. PWD don't have the option to stop being diabetic.

 

If this sounds more anti than pro, I don't mean it to -- there is simply a weight of things to say regarding the former.

 

Perhaps for people with diabetes, the gestural demonstration of wanting to understand what living with the disease is like to the best of the RN's ability is what they may consider most important.

 

I'd like to hear more, so please share any responses to this study that you may have seen from the DOC. Thanks!

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The quantified self: 85% hype?

The quantified self: 85% hype? | Doctor | Scoop.it
The patient-led, smartphone-based health care revolution is not knocking at the door of practices across America—at least not according to those doctors.
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How swimming micro-robots working in the body as ‘cargo transporters’ could change the face of medicine

How swimming micro-robots working in the body as ‘cargo transporters’ could change the face of medicine | Doctor | Scoop.it

Targeted interventions include:

 

Minimally invasive surgeryTargeted drug deliveryRemote sensingSingle cell manipulation
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Senior, Personnes Agées & Silver Economie's curator insight, November 23, 3:49 AM

Une équipe Suisse de l'ETH Zurich y travaille

Art Jones's curator insight, November 23, 9:39 AM

This sounds like the stuff of science fiction but it's not.   We have been making smaller and smaller technologies for a while now, that's why smartphones are so smart, packing the power only available in  room sized computers just a decade or more ago. Thanks to 3D printing we are making even more amazing strides in miniaturization, now it seems all things are possible. 


This excerpt explains what's possible now:

With an additive manufacturing technique, the scientists are able to use a complex method to create the micro-robots, or micro-actuators, which are then coated with biomedical materials. The scientists believe they could increase functionality and deliver medication to targets inside the body.


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Tablet computers in healthcare settings: novelty or necessity?

Tablet computers in healthcare settings: novelty or necessity? | Doctor | Scoop.it

As things currently stands, tablet computers are more than a novelty but are not as yet a necessity. Tablets are useful for data retrieval during ward rounds but their use as a tool to engage patients in the care process remains limited. Individual health professionals or organisations contemplating the introduction of mHealth are advised to speak to their IT department prior to purchasing tablet computers to understand their local clinical information systems requirements (e.g., operating system compatibility) and any limitations associated with translating the systems to smaller devices. Such considerations are critical if tablet computers are to deliver on their full potential.

 

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Bart Collet's comment, November 7, 5:24 AM
deploying task assignment and -registration via tablets as we speak :)
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"Meaningfully engaging patients and families as true partners in their care remains the exception, not the rule"

"Meaningfully engaging patients and families as true partners in their care remains the exception, not the rule" | Doctor | Scoop.it
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Art Jones's curator insight, October 20, 12:49 PM

If patient engagement is the wonder drug of the 21st century why are we having such a hard time engaging?

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Using digital strategies to promote health equity

Using digital strategies to promote health equity | Doctor | Scoop.it
Without addressing issues such as access, effectiveness and health literacy, implementing health and health care strategies that depend on digital technologies run a significant risk of increasing health disparities
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Philips and Radboud university medical center debut wearable diagnostic prototype for chronic illness

Philips and Radboud university medical center debut wearable diagnostic prototype for chronic illness | Doctor | Scoop.it

Philips and Radboud university medical center have announced the debut of a prototype to support patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

 

Management of COPD is challenging and often costly, as the progressive nature of the disease leads many patients to require complicated therapies and frequent hospital readmissions. At the same time, consumers are increasingly looking for new ways to take control of their personal health in order to live healthier and better lives.

 

"Unlike other wearable solutions recently introduced to the market, this prototype collects more than just wellness data from otherwise healthy people," said Jeroen Tas, CEO, Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services, Philips. "We are demonstrating the power of harnessing both clinical and personal health information to better manage chronic disease patients across the health continuum, from healthy living, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, recovery and home care."

 

The wearable diagnostic prototype for COPD patients feeds data collected from patients at home to clinicians through the PhilipsHealthSuite Digital Platform to two clinical applications currently available on the cloud-based platform – eCareCompanion and eCareCoordinator. Once a COPD patient has left the hospital, a wearable diagnostic prototype collects data day and night – including physical activity/inactivity, respiratory indicator, heart rhythm and heart rate variability.

 

That data is then sent via the cloud to the Philips HealthSuite Digital Platform, where it is shared with the appropriate care providers via the eCareCoordinator application, presenting a more complete view of the patient's illness

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Doctors remain skeptical of Apple's HealthKit

Doctors remain skeptical of Apple's HealthKit | Doctor | Scoop.it

Data accuracy is a concern: patient generated data has traditionally been self-reporting, which means it isn't always accurate or complete. The second issue is a concern about the accuracy of the devices used to record that data. Doctors and nurses trust certain device brands and sometimes discourage patients from selecting a device from another company, particularly new companies. Both of these can be serious concerns and are valid.

 

Another concern is that while there's a significant value to monitoring metrics for people with certain conditions, particularly chronic health problems like heart disease, diabetes, and COPD, tracking a huge range of metrics for people that are essentially healthy could load too much unneeded data into a person's health record. This seems to be a particular concern for primary care physicians, who are generally ranked as the most overworked doctors in the country.

 
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Surgical social media: the physician-patient connection

Surgical social media: the physician-patient connection | Doctor | Scoop.it

Healthcare should consider social media as a way to better inform patients of procedure and treatment risks, and to streamline efficiencies across doctor-patient communications.

 

Although surgeons already are using the technology to communicate with one another, driving equity of care in the process, we're only just beginning to glimpse social media's potential as a meaningful communications channel linking patient and physician.

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Apple envisions wireless wristbands for hospital stays

Apple envisions wireless wristbands for hospital stays | Doctor | Scoop.it

Apple patents indicate the development of technologies that could be used in a disposable wristband that stores and transmits health information to a doctor's smartphone.

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Senior, Personnes Agées & Silver Economie's curator insight, November 23, 3:52 AM

Des dépôts de brevets semblent montrer que Apple s'intéresse au sujet

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An Uber for healthcare? New app brings docs to your door

An Uber for healthcare? New app brings docs to your door | Doctor | Scoop.it

Taking a hint from on-demand car service Uber, several US companies have developed smartphone apps that bring physicians directly to patients—often for less that it would cost to receive treatment elsewhere.

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 11, 10:15 AM

The times they are a changing (for the better)!

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Five things that are missing from digital health

Five things that are missing from digital health | Doctor | Scoop.it

1. A practical digital health fellowship for providers and post-graduates

2. True interoperability

3. More women in leadership positions

4. A more robust representation of people involved in healthcare

5. A Hippocratic oath for the digital age

Andrew Spong's insight:

All sound enough observations.

 

Would any of them have made your top five?

 

Right now, mine would include:

 

1. A primary focus on patient outcomes as the driver of innovation

2. A secondary focus on reducing the personal and economic burden of care

3. A strong emphasis on design and the promotion of user uptake, utilisation, and retention

4. Interoperability (my definition includes not just connected systems, but also integrated workflows, and assumes a commitment to promoting open, anonymised data)

5. Dialogue: by which I do not mean ceaseless pronouncements about the seductive distractions of novelty, but rather the nurturing of ongoing, iterative, analytic discussions between designers, healthcare systems, clinicians, and users regarding objectives and outcomes (as well as the UX and UI) at every stage of the developmental process -- before, during, and after initiation

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Personalised medicine for kids: 3D printing's pediatric possibilities

Personalised medicine for kids: 3D printing's pediatric possibilities | Doctor | Scoop.it
3D Pediatrics is taking part in DreamIt Ventures' Open Canvas@CHOP. It wants to use 3D printing technology to provide customized medical devices for kids.
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81% of HCPs want more direct connection between CME and patient health outcomes

81% of HCPs want more direct connection between CME and patient health outcomes | Doctor | Scoop.it

When asked whether users would like to see a more direct connection between the CME they take and patient outcomes, eighty-one percent of HCPs surveyed responded affirmatively.

 

Seventy-eight percent of respondents said "yes" when asked whether CME delivered at the point of care (in the form of decision support) could lend valuable insights into the management of patients.

 

The survey also found that less than one percent of respondents currently consume CME through an EHR system, demonstrating a significant unmet need in the marketplace for new approaches to CME delivery.

 

 

Andrew Spong's insight:

What did the other 19 percent want? <boggle>

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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, July 24, 7:41 AM
EHR Electronic Health Records