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Rescooped by Liz Ciccio from Gastroenterologist Connect
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Indicator of chronic fatigue syndrome found in gut bacteria | Cornell Chronicle

Indicator of chronic fatigue syndrome found in gut bacteria | Cornell Chronicle | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
Cornell Chronicle: Daily news from Cornell University
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Cedars-Sinai receives FDA approval to evaluate stem cell-gene therapy in ALS patients

Cedars-Sinai receives FDA approval to evaluate stem cell-gene therapy in ALS patients | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
The FDA has granted approval to Cedars-Sinai investigators to test a combination of stem cell-gene therapy for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
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Yale Medicine doctors combat heartbreaking hair loss > Yale Medicine | Yale School of Medicine

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Effect of soy on metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors: a randomized controlled trial

Effect of soy on metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors: a randomized controlled trial | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
Cardiovascular diseases are currently the commonest cause of death worldwide. Different strategies for their primary prevention have been planned, taking into account the main known risk factors, whic
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The limits to human lifespan must be respected

The limits to human lifespan must be respected | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
Lengthening our lives will come at a cost.

 

A study published online in Nature uses demographic data to reveal a lifespan that human beings cannot exceed, simply by virtue of being human. It’s like running, as an accompanying News and Views article points out. Elite athletes might shave a few milliseconds off the world record for the 100-meter sprint, but they’ll never run the same distance in, say, five seconds, or two. Human beings are simply not made that way. The same is true for longevity. The consequences of myriad factors related to our genetics, metabolism, reproduction and development, all shaped over millions of years of evolution, means that few humans will make it past their 120th birthdays. The name of Jeanne Calment, who died in 1997 at the age of 122, is likely to remain as long in the memory in the Methuselah stakes as that of Usain Bolt on the Olympic track.

 

Maximum lifespan is a bald measure of years accumulated. It is not the same as life expectancy, which is an actuarial measure of how long one is expected to live from birth, or indeed from any given age. Life expectancy at birth has increased in most countries over the past century, not because people have longer lifespans, but mainly because infectious disease does not kill as many infants as it once did. Factors such as poverty and warfare conspire to decrease life expectancy. Although life expectancy at birth has risen steadily for both men and women in France since 1900, for example, there are dramatic and poignant drops that coincide with the two world wars.

 

In Britain in the early twentieth century, many children still died from infectious diseases, and men would die shortly after retiring from physically demanding jobs. The National Health Service was the political response. It has become, in some ways, the victim of its own success. People live longer than they did even a few decades ago, and die (eventually) of different (and more expensive) complaints. As any beginning medical student is soon taught, gerontology is far from a dying discipline. So if we owe our increases in life expectancy to better public health, nutrition, sanitation and vaccination, is it not fair to ask whether more-effective treatments for diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s might also yield dividends in maximum lifespan? Will 120th birthday parties become routine, outmatched by a small yet increasing number of sesquicentenarians? The demographic data say no. People are living longer, and the population as a whole is greying, but the rate of increase in the number of centenarians is slowing, and might even have peaked.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Liz Ciccio from Hepatitis C New Drugs Review
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JCI - Insulin receptor Thr1160 phosphorylation mediates lipid-induced hepatic insulin resistance

JCI - Insulin receptor Thr1160 phosphorylation mediates lipid-induced hepatic insulin resistance | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
RT @jclinicalinvest: PKEe targets phosphorylated #insulin receptor Thr1160 in hepatic insulin resistance https://t.co/48g5bPxvJO @YaleMed #…

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but whether NAFLD plays a causal role in the pathogenesis of T2D is uncertain. One proposed mechanism linking NAFLD to hepatic insulin resistance involves diacylglycerol-mediated (DAG-mediated) activation of protein kinase C-ε (PKCε) and the consequent inhibition of insulin receptor (INSR) kinase activity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PKCε inhibition of INSR kinase activity is unknown. Here, we used mass spectrometry to identify the phosphorylation site Thr1160 as a PKCε substrate in the functionally critical INSR kinase activation loop. We hypothesized that Thr1160 phosphorylation impairs INSR kinase activity by destabilizing the active configuration of the INSR kinase, and our results confirmed this prediction by demonstrating severely impaired INSR kinase activity in phosphomimetic T1160E mutants. Conversely, the INSR T1160A mutant was not inhibited by PKCε in vitro. Furthermore, mice with a threonine-to-alanine mutation at the homologous residue Thr1150 (InsrT1150A mice) were protected from high fat diet–induced hepatic insulin resistance. InsrT1150A mice also displayed increased insulin signaling, suppression of hepatic glucose production, and increased hepatic glycogen synthesis compared with WT controls during hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. These data reveal a critical pathophysiological role for INSR Thr1160 phosphorylation and provide further mechanistic links between PKCε and INSR in mediating NAFLD-induced hepatic insulin resistance.

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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, October 17, 7:45 PM
Insulin receptor Thr1160 phosphorylation mediates lipid-induced hepatic insulin resistance Max C. Petersen ... Jesse Rinehart, Gerald I. Shulman Published October 17, 2016 Citation Information: J Clin Invest. 2016. doi:10.1172/JCI86013.
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News Detail

News Detail | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
Artificial structures of tumour antigens, mimotopes, applied in vaccinations of cancer patients can trigger a long-term immune response. For the vaccine, however, a carrier is required that triggers an immune response itself. Researchers from the Messerli Research Institute at Vetmeduni Vienna thus produced mimotopes for HER2, a tumour antigen of about 30 percent of breast tumours, at virus-like particles of harmless adeno-associated viruses (AAV) without chemical after-treatment and used them directly as a specific vaccine. This vaccine could serve as a prophylaxis for high-risk patients or breast cancer patients that have already received a therapy. Treatment of canine breast tumours likewise seems possible. The results were published in OncoImmunology and Oncology Letters.
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Doctor Develops New Method to Significantly Reduce Cost and Improve Effectiveness of Cancer Treatment

Doctor Develops New Method to Significantly Reduce Cost and Improve Effectiveness of Cancer Treatment | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
MEXICO CITY, Oct. 13, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Doctor Develops New Method to Significantly Reduce Cost and Improve Effectiveness of Cance
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Rescooped by Liz Ciccio from Gastroenterologist Connect
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IIDR study: Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn’s disease |

IIDR study: Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn’s disease | | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
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Even partial steroid treatment can benefit extremely preterm infants, NIH study suggests

Infants exposed to partial treatment in the womb healthier than those not exposed.
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Medical students need exposure to chronic pain patients

Medical students need exposure to chronic pain patients | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
We need exposure to these patients, to understand what we are facing, so we are not surprised when we reach intern year.
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Rescooped by Liz Ciccio from Autoimmune diseases (Lupus, RA), Vaccines and Stem Cell Therapies Highlights
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GSK announces US regulatory submission of candidate vaccine for prevention of shingles | GSK

GSK announces US regulatory submission of candidate vaccine for prevention of shingles | GSK | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it

Regulatory submissions in the EU and Canada remain on track for 2016


GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE/NYSE: GSK) today announced that it has submitted a Biologics License Application (BLA) for its candidate shingles vaccine, ShingrixTM, to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), seeking approval for the prevention of herpes zoster (shingles) in people aged 50 years or over.


The regulatory submission for Shingrix is based on a comprehensive phase III clinical trial programme evaluating its efficacy, safety and immunogenicity in more than 37,000 people. This includes the ZOE-50 and ZOE-70 studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine in April 2015 and September 2016, respectively.1,2


Via Krishan Maggon
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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, October 24, 10:27 AM
The candidate vaccine is a non-live, recombinant vaccine to help prevent shingles and its complications. The phase III clinical trial programme showed that by reducing the incidence of shingles, the candidate vaccine also reduced the overall incidence of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a form of chronic pain associated with shingles. Regulatory approval is being sought for the vaccine to be given intramuscularly in two doses, with a two to six month interval between doses.
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Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1

Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
Summary Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals.

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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, October 22, 7:22 PM
Cell Volume 167, Issue 3, p750–762.e14, 20 October 2016 

 Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 

 Tian Hua, Kiran Vemuri, Mengchen Pu, Lu Qu, Gye Won Han, Yiran Wu, Suwen Zhao, Wenqing Shui, Shanshan Li, Anisha Korde, Robert B. Laprairie, Edward L. Stahl, Jo-Hao Ho, Nikolai Zvonok, Han Zhou, Irina Kufareva, Beili Wu, Qiang Zhao, Michael A. Hanson, Laura M. Bohn, Alexandros Makriyannis, Raymond C. Stevens, Zhi-Jie Liu 

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NIH study determines key differences between allergic and non-allergic dust mite proteins

Finding may lead to better therapies for individuals with dust mite allergies.
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Dietary Intake of Protein in Early Childhood Is Associated with Growth Trajectories between 1 and 9 Years of Age. - PubMed - NCBI

Dietary Intake of Protein in Early Childhood Is Associated with Growth Trajectories between 1 and 9 Years of Age. - PubMed - NCBI | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
J Nutr. 2016 Oct 12. pii: jn237164. [Epub ahead of print]
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Common Prostate Cancer Treatment Tied to Dementia

A common hormone therapy to treat prostate cancer may double a man’s risk of dementia, regardless of his age, Penn Medicine researchers reported in a study published online today in JAMA Oncology.
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Private or salaried practice: how do young general practitioners make their career choice? A qualitative study. - PubMed - NCBI

BMC Med Educ. 2016 Sep 1;16(1):231. doi: 10.1186/s12909-016-0754-6.
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Telephone-Delivered Stepped Collaborative Care for Treating Anxiety in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial. - PubMed - NCBI

Telephone-Delivered Stepped Collaborative Care for Treating Anxiety in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial. - PubMed - NCBI | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
J Gen Intern Med. 2016 Oct 6. [Epub ahead of print]
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Cannabis excess linked to bone thinning | The University of Edinburgh

People who regularly smoke large amounts of cannabis have reduced bone density and are more prone to fractures, research has found.
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Racial Differences in the Incidence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older Black and White Adults. - PubMed - NCBI

Racial Differences in the Incidence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older Black and White Adults. - PubMed - NCBI | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Sep 26. doi: 10.1111/jgs.14472. [Epub ahead of print]
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Rescooped by Liz Ciccio from Radiologist Connect
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Imaging Stroke Risk in 4D

Imaging Stroke Risk in 4D | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
New MRI technique detects blood flow velocity to identify who is most at risk for stroke, so they can be treated accordingly.
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UCI News - UCI-SUNY research details how workplace stress contributes to cardiovascular disease

UCI News - UCI-SUNY research details how workplace stress contributes to cardiovascular disease | Doctor Unite | Scoop.it
Study authors recommend policies to lessen stressful employment conditions
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