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Diagnosing the contemporary healthcare professional's digital habits
Curated by Andrew Spong
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Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster.

Healthcare is getting better. Let's talk about what you can do to make it even better, faster. | Doctor | Scoop.it

Click on the link above to contact Andrew Spong, Managing Director, STweM Ltd.

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Will patient-generated data from HealthKit reshape the EMR?

Will patient-generated data from HealthKit reshape the EMR? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Some industry stakeholders from providers to investors to consumer device makers think something like Apple’s HealthKit could be the catalyst that finally brings the patient — and patient-generated data — into the healthcare ecosystem in a way that electronic medical records have persistently failed to do.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Whilst I think the general theme delineated here -- consumer-collated, interoperable, personalised health data redefining what the 'electronic health record' is, and toppling legacy providers -- is germane, from what we know of HealthKit so far it seems unlikely to be the sort of epoch-defining release that the article's title suggests.

 

However, if Google were to acquire a company like Withings and integrate its products into Android...

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Doctors of data: ethics, law, and the electronic medical record

Doctors of data: ethics, law, and the electronic medical record | Doctor | Scoop.it
The convergence of life sciences and technology promises significant gains for public health, but are ethics and law ready for the consequences?
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Figure 1: a new clinical image sharing platform for doctors only

Figure 1: a new clinical image sharing platform for doctors only | Doctor | Scoop.it

An app which enables healthcare professionals to share photos is to be rolled out across western Europe by the end of the year.

 

The app was designed to enable doctors to share pictures of their patients, both with each other and with medical students.

 

So far, more than 150,000 doctors have uploaded case photos with the patient's identity obscured.

Andrew Spong's insight:

Not having access to this platform (for very good reasons) I can't comment on its functionality.

 

There are pros and cons to any image sharing resource, but my first question is: what is Figure 1's business model?

 

As the app is free, and I don't see any premium subscription product, does this mean anonymised data about clinician interests and behaviours is being sold to third parties?

 

On the plus side, I like the fact that Figure 1 is in keeping with the emerging interest in clinicians in #FOAMed-like peer-sourced medical education rather than legacy CME, which is looking less and less relevant.

 

The observation Dr. Landy makes in this piece about existing clinical decision support tools being 'highly curated repositories of articles written and edited by experts' is a polite way of saying that clinicians are increasingly uncomfortable with anything resembling 'eminence based medicine' which is not open to critique or emendation.

 

On the negative side, any clinical image-sharing platform is going to run up against the limitations of its own functionality when users wish, for example, to consider aspects of the clinical implications of the image against the fuller history of a patient's EHR.

 

Perhaps Figure 1 is looking to present itself as a modular solution which could be acquired by and integrated into one of the leading EHR's? Who knows.

 

I have broader concerns about consent, anonymity, verification, and abuse, but these would of course apply to any similar tool as well. Some of the language in the FAQ accessible from Figure 1's Twitter URL isn't as robust as I personally would have liked it to be.

 

It will be interesting to see what happens next.

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Marc Senterre's curator insight, October 14, 4:38 PM

Things are moving fast !

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Philips rolls out health applications for chronic care management at home

Philips rolls out health applications for chronic care management at home | Doctor | Scoop.it

Part of Philips Hospital to Home’s suite of telehealth programs, eCareCoordinator and eCareCompanion, received USDA’s 510(k) clearance, are focused on patient care within the home and the first clinical applications to be available through the cloud-based digital health platform.

 

The application gives clinicians real-time access to both objective health data – like vital signs, blood pressure and weight — as well as subjective responses collected via health questionnaires and other communication with the care team about the patient’s status.

 

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Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson to optimise pairing of patients with clinical trials

Mayo Clinic partners with IBM's Watson to optimise pairing of patients with clinical trials | Doctor | Scoop.it
Mayo hopes to speed up clinical trial timelines and increase participation with the help of the cognitive computer. 
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Virtual therapy sessions make mental health care more widely available

Virtual therapy sessions make mental health care more widely available | Doctor | Scoop.it
The mental health field is perhaps uniquely suited to transition from face-to-face meetings to online appointments. Despite hurdles related to insurance reimbursement and concerns about whether an interpersonal connection can survive in the virtual world, proponents say that online therapy is an effective solution to bring mental health care to those who might not otherwise get it.
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Why doctors want the FDA to regulate health and fitness apps

Why doctors want the FDA to regulate health and fitness apps | Doctor | Scoop.it
Technology is shaping the future of healthcare, and while technology has brought a number of innovative healthcare solutions, some are worried about the growing impact and potential danger of unregulated health IT apps. Plenty of health and fitness apps in the Apple App Store and Google Play range from harmless to helpful, but doctors are worried about untested and unregulated apps that claim to replace medical devices or diagnose illnesses. Doctors are now asking the FDA to take notice and are warning the public to evaluate these apps with a critical eye.
Andrew Spong's insight:

This. Will. Never. Happen...

 

...for reasons of resourcing alone.

 

However, once they're settled their first class action against a health app, I can still see Apple and Google hiring massive clinical faculties to assure the quality of apps in house.

 

For health app makers, the era of low-to-no scrutiny will soon be over.

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Joel Finkle's curator insight, August 7, 9:52 AM

Sensible - doctors don't want apps that are inaccurate leading to poor choices on patients' part.

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How the demands of healthcare delivery are superseding the privacy debate

How the demands of healthcare delivery are superseding the privacy debate | Doctor | Scoop.it

Technology has the ability to reduce the cost of delivering healthcare, and can be utilised effectively in order to reduce the personal and economic burden of care in single-payer healthcare systems.

 

It’s just a shame that this has had to be pointed out 50 million times in the UK, at untold cost to patients and their families.

 

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Fakebetes HCP challenge: the new nurse

Fakebetes HCP challenge: the new nurse | Doctor | Scoop.it

As a healthcare provider without diabetes, I will never fully understand what it is like to live with diabetes. I do however try my best to understand the day-to-day challenges as best as I can. I have tested my own blood sugars, worn all the insulin pumps and CGM devices, taken saline injections, etc.; I also engage in the DOC (diabetes online community).

 

To try to encourage other healthcare providers to gain better perspective on diabetes, I worked with members of the DOC to set-up a fakebetes challenge. Whitney, a new nursing graduate, and Kim Vlasnik both volunteered to be first to take this challenge, and were paired together.

 

In this fakebetes challenge, Kim text Whitney fake insulin doses, including a carb ratio and correction factor; and blood sugar readings from her own glucometer. Whitney was encouraged to check her own blood sugars and count carbohydrates, but take saline injections according to the blood sugars Kim had text text her. In this way there would be some blood sugar readings in different ranges to think about and respond to.

Andrew Spong's insight:

I'd be really interested to hear what the DOC thought of this initiative.

 

I'm conflicted, to be honest. On the one hand, I very much admire the commitment of the healthcare professionals involved to immerse themselves as fully as possible in the experience of living with diabetes.

 

However, in the last instance that does not extend beyond the routines involved with optimal management.

 

Also, for fear of stating the obvious, it can never take the provider inside the body and mind of a person living with diabetes to afford them first-hand experience of the multi-factorial inconveniences, physical discomforts and pain, and mental challenges of the disease.

 

Most significantly, their pancreas is still working. PWD don't have the option to stop being diabetic.

 

If this sounds more anti than pro, I don't mean it to -- there is simply a weight of things to say regarding the former.

 

Perhaps for people with diabetes, the gestural demonstration of wanting to understand what living with the disease is like to the best of the RN's ability is what they may consider most important.

 

I'd like to hear more, so please share any responses to this study that you may have seen from the DOC. Thanks!

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Smartphone app alerts doctor when patient exhibits symptoms

Smartphone app alerts doctor when patient exhibits symptoms | Doctor | Scoop.it
MIT researchers developed an app, Ginger.io, that collects data about its users behaviors, locations, health conditions and habits and then notes inconsistencies that may predict the onset of problems such as depression. The app alerts health care providers for intervention.
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The doctor will Skype you now: is e-consulting a good idea?

The doctor will Skype you now: is e-consulting a good idea? | Doctor | Scoop.it

Electronic consultation systems use the Internet to deliver health services to people all around the world and has been shown to reduce unnecessary visits to specialists, with a meaningful percentage of cases being resolved without a face-to-face visit. As a result, wait times are less for those who really do need to see a specialist. Skype is one method that is popular among health-care providers today. 

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LinkedIn, HCP communities and facebook matter most to the 56% of clinicians who use social professionally

LinkedIn, HCP communities and facebook matter most to the 56% of clinicians who use social professionally | Doctor | Scoop.it

When it comes to social media, the top sites that doctors do seem to use for work are LinkedIn, online physician communities, and Facebook (see chart below). The specialities that reported the most use of online physician communities were ophthalmology, geriatrics, psychiatry, otolaryngology, and oncology.

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"Meaningfully engaging patients and families as true partners in their care remains the exception, not the rule"

"Meaningfully engaging patients and families as true partners in their care remains the exception, not the rule" | Doctor | Scoop.it
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Art Jones's curator insight, October 20, 12:49 PM

If patient engagement is the wonder drug of the 21st century why are we having such a hard time engaging?

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Using digital strategies to promote health equity

Using digital strategies to promote health equity | Doctor | Scoop.it
Without addressing issues such as access, effectiveness and health literacy, implementing health and health care strategies that depend on digital technologies run a significant risk of increasing health disparities
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Philips and Radboud university medical center debut wearable diagnostic prototype for chronic illness

Philips and Radboud university medical center debut wearable diagnostic prototype for chronic illness | Doctor | Scoop.it

Philips and Radboud university medical center have announced the debut of a prototype to support patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

 

Management of COPD is challenging and often costly, as the progressive nature of the disease leads many patients to require complicated therapies and frequent hospital readmissions. At the same time, consumers are increasingly looking for new ways to take control of their personal health in order to live healthier and better lives.

 

"Unlike other wearable solutions recently introduced to the market, this prototype collects more than just wellness data from otherwise healthy people," said Jeroen Tas, CEO, Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services, Philips. "We are demonstrating the power of harnessing both clinical and personal health information to better manage chronic disease patients across the health continuum, from healthy living, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, recovery and home care."

 

The wearable diagnostic prototype for COPD patients feeds data collected from patients at home to clinicians through the PhilipsHealthSuite Digital Platform to two clinical applications currently available on the cloud-based platform – eCareCompanion and eCareCoordinator. Once a COPD patient has left the hospital, a wearable diagnostic prototype collects data day and night – including physical activity/inactivity, respiratory indicator, heart rhythm and heart rate variability.

 

That data is then sent via the cloud to the Philips HealthSuite Digital Platform, where it is shared with the appropriate care providers via the eCareCoordinator application, presenting a more complete view of the patient's illness

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Doctors remain skeptical of Apple's HealthKit

Doctors remain skeptical of Apple's HealthKit | Doctor | Scoop.it

Data accuracy is a concern: patient generated data has traditionally been self-reporting, which means it isn't always accurate or complete. The second issue is a concern about the accuracy of the devices used to record that data. Doctors and nurses trust certain device brands and sometimes discourage patients from selecting a device from another company, particularly new companies. Both of these can be serious concerns and are valid.

 

Another concern is that while there's a significant value to monitoring metrics for people with certain conditions, particularly chronic health problems like heart disease, diabetes, and COPD, tracking a huge range of metrics for people that are essentially healthy could load too much unneeded data into a person's health record. This seems to be a particular concern for primary care physicians, who are generally ranked as the most overworked doctors in the country.

 
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Surgical social media: the physician-patient connection

Surgical social media: the physician-patient connection | Doctor | Scoop.it

Healthcare should consider social media as a way to better inform patients of procedure and treatment risks, and to streamline efficiencies across doctor-patient communications.

 

Although surgeons already are using the technology to communicate with one another, driving equity of care in the process, we're only just beginning to glimpse social media's potential as a meaningful communications channel linking patient and physician.

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Apple envisions wireless wristbands for hospital stays

Apple envisions wireless wristbands for hospital stays | Doctor | Scoop.it

Apple patents indicate the development of technologies that could be used in a disposable wristband that stores and transmits health information to a doctor's smartphone.

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An Uber for healthcare? New app brings docs to your door

An Uber for healthcare? New app brings docs to your door | Doctor | Scoop.it

Taking a hint from on-demand car service Uber, several US companies have developed smartphone apps that bring physicians directly to patients—often for less that it would cost to receive treatment elsewhere.

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 11, 10:15 AM

The times they are a changing (for the better)!

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Five things that are missing from digital health

Five things that are missing from digital health | Doctor | Scoop.it

1. A practical digital health fellowship for providers and post-graduates

2. True interoperability

3. More women in leadership positions

4. A more robust representation of people involved in healthcare

5. A Hippocratic oath for the digital age

Andrew Spong's insight:

All sound enough observations.

 

Would any of them have made your top five?

 

Right now, mine would include:

 

1. A primary focus on patient outcomes as the driver of innovation

2. A secondary focus on reducing the personal and economic burden of care

3. A strong emphasis on design and the promotion of user uptake, utilisation, and retention

4. Interoperability (my definition includes not just connected systems, but also integrated workflows, and assumes a commitment to promoting open, anonymised data)

5. Dialogue: by which I do not mean ceaseless pronouncements about the seductive distractions of novelty, but rather the nurturing of ongoing, iterative, analytic discussions between designers, healthcare systems, clinicians, and users regarding objectives and outcomes (as well as the UX and UI) at every stage of the developmental process -- before, during, and after initiation

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Personalised medicine for kids: 3D printing's pediatric possibilities

Personalised medicine for kids: 3D printing's pediatric possibilities | Doctor | Scoop.it
3D Pediatrics is taking part in DreamIt Ventures' Open Canvas@CHOP. It wants to use 3D printing technology to provide customized medical devices for kids.
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81% of HCPs want more direct connection between CME and patient health outcomes

81% of HCPs want more direct connection between CME and patient health outcomes | Doctor | Scoop.it

When asked whether users would like to see a more direct connection between the CME they take and patient outcomes, eighty-one percent of HCPs surveyed responded affirmatively.

 

Seventy-eight percent of respondents said "yes" when asked whether CME delivered at the point of care (in the form of decision support) could lend valuable insights into the management of patients.

 

The survey also found that less than one percent of respondents currently consume CME through an EHR system, demonstrating a significant unmet need in the marketplace for new approaches to CME delivery.

 

 

Andrew Spong's insight:

What did the other 19 percent want? <boggle>

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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, July 24, 7:41 AM
EHR Electronic Health Records
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Smartphones: the new stethoscopes

Smartphones: the new stethoscopes | Doctor | Scoop.it

Among the many instruments your doctor uses — stethoscope, thermometer, scale — the most valuable one may be in her pocket: a smartphone.   Due to increasingly compressed office visits, patients are becoming more active participants in managing their healthcare, and a new generation of Internet-savvy physicians is using social media to improve the way they run their practices. Currently, 67 percent of physicians use social media — sites like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Pinterest — for professional purposes, according to a recent report released by the Federation of State Medical Boards. One Yahoo Facebook user reported that her nurse practitioner gives advice over the social networking site, while another said sharing photos and videos can even save her a trip to the office.   “Social media is changing the way people give and receive information and, as a result, the medical profession is changing, too,” Lee Aase, social media director at the Mayo Clinic, tells Yahoo Health.

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Survey: 80% of smartphone users would like to use their devices to interact with HCPs

Survey: 80% of smartphone users would like to use their devices to interact with HCPs | Doctor | Scoop.it

A survey (n=2,239) of smartphone users across geographies found that:

 

* 71% of smartphone users are open to offers of relevant health care services from businesses

* 80% of patients would like the option to use their smartphones to interact with health care providers

* 56% of people worldwide trust health care organisations with personal data and indicated that while e-health records have yet to take off in many countries, innovations around mobile alerts and information services are helping build trust

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Marcus Healey's curator insight, July 15, 4:24 PM

The impending m-health revolution is in its infancy, but coming sooner than planned?

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3D printing the human circulatory system

3D printing the human circulatory system | Doctor | Scoop.it

From skin to guns to customisable phone covers to mini-robots, the capacities of 3D printing are widening all the time.

Now, in a development that could have big implications in the transplant field, scientists have figured out how to print a circulatory system which is vital to keeping tissue alive.

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