Primary HSIE Stage 1: SSS1.7 Explains how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants - Personal needs and wants
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TEACHER RESOURCE WITH A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE: Vital Water Graphics - An overview of the state of the world's fresh and marine waters

TEACHER RESOURCE WITH A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE: Vital Water Graphics - An overview of the state of the world's fresh and marine waters | Primary HSIE Stage 1: SSS1.7 Explains how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants - Personal needs and wants | Scoop.it
An Overview of the State of the World’s Fresh and Marine Waters - 2nd Edition - 2008
Harry Stiles's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTIONS: Do I want it or need it? How do I get it? What do I do with it?

 

As water is a universal need, it is essential for teachers to consider how other countries across the world are tackling water quality and accessibility to inform their teaching. The Vital Water Graphics 2008 report has been created by the United Nations Environment Programme and aims to provide people with information on the world’s water supply, needs, management and distribution, both today and for the future. The report provides information graphically with written elaborations.

 

Whilst teachers must teach the water needs at a local level to students, they must embed that understanding within the greater context of the world. Considering that Australia is the driest continent in the world and depends heavily on foreign trade, knowledge of the world’s water supply in relation to the world’s estimated population growth is essential for both teachers and students. Teachers can adapt the information from this report for Stage 1 by having students locate other countries with similar and different water supply levels. Students could further explore global water needs by examining how various countries use water in their industries or by considering the effect of a lack of fresh water to a family/community/country.

 

Global education is increasingly important with the advent of globalisation as it allows students to examine Australia’s interdependent relationships, natural resource sustainability - the implications of actions on a global level, and to develop an awareness of the beliefs, needs and desires of others, thereby fostering empathy and respect (Global Education, 2014, pp. 4-5).

 

Reference

 

Global Education (2014). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. [e-book] pp. 4-5. Retrieved from:

http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/GPS_web.pdf [Accessed: 6 Apr 2014].

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STUDENT RESOURCE: Caroline's Bathtime (interactive e-book)

STUDENT RESOURCE: Caroline's Bathtime (interactive e-book) | Primary HSIE Stage 1: SSS1.7 Explains how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants - Personal needs and wants | Scoop.it
Interactive eBooks for students in early Primary School that can be read by teachers, parents, and children
Harry Stiles's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTIONS: Do I want it or need it? How do I get it? What do I do with it?

 

The Save Water Alliance, a not-for-profit industry association of Victoria has created a selection of resources for primary school teachers that can be used in part or in whole in relation to water needs.

 

Caroline’s Bathtime is a simple children’s story (e-book) about a young girl and the ways in which she uses and saves water and by doing so relates the abstract concept of water conservation back to the individual and their home. This story links with literacy development and computer literacy whilst discussing the HSIE topic of personal needs and wants. With the explicit guidance of a teacher, this e-book could be used to relate the behaviour of the character in the story to that of students. A teacher could ask students to consider their own attitudes to water before reading: how students use water, where students get water from etc. Students could then read the story independently or as a group. There is a function on this e-book to have the story read aloud, this could be used in the case where Stage 1 readers are not yet able to read a book of this difficulty on their own, in which case the teacher could have the students read along with the computer.

 

After the story has been read, a teacher could ask students to list the various ways in which the character saved water and list further ways in which the students themselves save water at home or at school, thereby exploring the inquiry questions: “Do I want it or need it?” and “What do I do with it?”

 

Quintero (2010, pp.11-12) emphasises the importance of the use of story in teaching, suggesting that stories enable students to grasp abstract ideas by personalising and familiarising the content. In this way, Caroline’s Bathtime provides a fable where students can relate to the protagonist as a similar person to themselves and follow her example, providing for a better appreciation of the relevance and complexity of the issue of water conservation and their personal involvement in combatting water wastage.

 

Reference

Quintero, E. P. (2010). Something to Say: Children Learning Through Story.
Early Education and Development . 21 (3) Retrieved from: http://www.tandfonline.com.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/doi/pdf/10.1080/10409280903440612 [Accessed: 4 Apr 2014]

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STUDENT RESOURCE WITH AN ABORIGINAL/TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PERSPECTIVE: Tiddalik the Frog (animation)

STUDENT RESOURCE WITH AN ABORIGINAL/TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PERSPECTIVE: Tiddalik the Frog (animation) | Primary HSIE Stage 1: SSS1.7 Explains how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants - Personal needs and wants | Scoop.it
IndigiTUBE is an online community for sharing and accessing media made by and for Indigenous people in remote Australia.
Harry Stiles's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTIONS: Do I want it or need it? How do I get it? What do I do with it?

 

Tiddalik the Frog is an Aboriginal Dreamtime story of the Awabakal people of the Newcastle/Hunter region of NSW (Miromaa Aboriginal Language & Technology Centre, 2014). This animation has been produced by students of The Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education in Alice Springs, 2009, under the Traditional Stories unit and made accessible on the website, IndigiTUBE. IndigiTUBE is an Indigenous video streaming service funded under the Indigenous Broadcasting Program (IndigiTUBE, 2014).

 

Tiddalik the Frog is about a giant frog that drinks all the water of the land, leaving none for the other animals, thinking only of himself. The story discusses needs, wants and greed, prompting students to consider their own personal needs and wants against those of others. Another important element is that this story illustrates that water is a finite resource, requiring careful decision-making in its usage.

 

This story could be used to introduce the topic of water conservation by asking students to consider the various perspectives of the characters and their needs and wants. Following on from this viewing, students could examine their daily water intake (answering the inquiry questions) and participate in various sorting/classification activities (concrete, visual and written).

 

As part of a larger unit of work surrounding the Awabakal people, students could explore oral story telling as a traditional Indigenous method of passing on information to others. Students could re-enact Tiddalik the Frog and use it to teach other students in the school about water needs/wants, emphasising the social significance of Dreamtime storytelling.

 

Another possible activity for students would be to divide an amount of water equally. Students work in small groups and are given a jug of water and a cup for each student. Students must find a way of distributing the water so that everyone receives an equal portion.

 

References

 

IndigiTUBE. (2014). About - indigiTUBE | The Voice of Remote Indigenous Australia. [online] Retrieved from: http://indigitube.com.au/about-us [Accessed: 5 Apr 2014].

 

Miromaa Aboriginal Language & Technology Centre. (2014). Awabakal Dreaming. [online] Retrieved from: http://www.miromaa.org.au/Culture/Awabakal-Dreaming.html [Accessed: 5 Apr 2014].

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TEACHER RESOURCE: Urban Water System - Sydney Water

TEACHER RESOURCE: Urban Water System - Sydney Water | Primary HSIE Stage 1: SSS1.7 Explains how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants - Personal needs and wants | Scoop.it
Harry Stiles's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTIONS: Do I want it or need it? How do I get it? What do I do with it?

 

This website could act as a primary resource for teachers when designing projects for students about how Sydney gets its water.Sydney Water provides an interactive map of the elaborate system that is behind Sydney’s water supply as well as a variety of other student and teacher resources suitable for Stage 1-3 students. However this website primarily contains information suitable for Stage 2 and 3 students. With a teacher’s assistance, this website could be accessed by Stage 1 students to deconstruct the visuals and written information.

 

In addition to this website, a teacher may also consult the Sydney Catchment Authority’s Warragamba Dam website for more specific information and videos about Sydney’s largest dam and its processes:

http://www.sca.nsw.gov.au/water/visit/warragamba-dam.

 

An example of a project that could be developed from this site is for students to draw a simple flow chart of Sydney’s water system or create a simple model using Marble Maze tubing to represent how to transport water (see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDEjUk4j7e4 for an example). A concrete representation such as this would allow students to investigate the exact requirements for a functioning water system and specifically answer the inquiry question “How do I get it?” Moch (2001, p. 7) amongst others, stresses the use of “manipulative” examples, as they enable students to develop a physical understanding that will assist them to develop an abstract understanding of the concept. When using the Marble Maze tubing it would become clear that the tubing must be joined seamlessly to be most effective and that for water to flow uphill it requires substantial force or mechanical assistance. This further explores students’ notions of forces and links to prior experiences of the behaviour of water.

 

Reference

 

Moch, P. L. (2001). Manipulatives work! The Educational Forum, 66(1), 81. Retrieved from

http://ezproxy.library.usyd.edu.au/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/220694902?accountid=14757 [Accessed 4 Apr 2014].

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TEACHER RESOURCE: Water - Learn it for life! (unit of work)

Harry Stiles's insight:

INQUIRY QUESTIONS: Do I want it or need it? How do I get it? What do I do with it?

 

Water: Learn it for Life! is a unit of work created by the Queensland Government Department of Natural Resources and Mines to promote an awareness of the issues surrounding water for Stage 1 primary students. The unit is aligned with the Australian Curriculum key learning area of Science.


This unit of work could be used to provide an interdisciplinary approach to the topic of Personal Needs and Wants/Resource Systems in relation to water. As this is a science orientated unit of work, it would be essential for teachers to adapt the lessons in a way that further interprets the content with an HSIE focus, i.e. rather than being a direct lesson guide, this unit of work provides a framework for teachers when planning lessons and assessments.

 

It provides a lesson sequence that allows students to consider their own personal water usage as well as that of others in their local and greater community. By using an interdisciplinary approach we are better able to provide students with a holistic understanding of water: as a basic human need, its properties/forms, uses and users, and as a finite resource. This detail enables students to fully appreciate the inquiry questions:

 

Do I want it or need it?How do I get it?What do I do with it?

 

The inquiry question “Do I want or need it?” is the overarching question that students need to be able to think about and answer with some complexity. By nature, HSIE lends itself to such an interdisciplinary approach as its subject matter generally encompasses various ways of thinking about aspects of life. Pearson (as cited by Harris and Alexander, 1998, p.118) explains the benefits of such an approach recognising that learning in one domain promotes learning in others. Drawing parallels in knowledge enables students to develop complex schemas that juxtapose agendas and foster critical reflection. Dufficy (2005, p.35) also promotes such an approach and suggests that it creates “a conversation where knowledge [is not] a fixed body of information but a ‘problematic.’”

 

References

 

Dufficy, P. (2005). Designing learning for diverse classrooms. Sydney: Southwood Press, p. 35.

 

Harris, K. R., & Alexander, P. (1998). Integrated constructivist education: Challenge and reality. Educational Psychology Review, 10, p. 118.

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