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'Django Unchained': Tarantino, DiCaprio, Foxx Answer Critics

"Nightline's" Cynthia McFadden's exclusive interview with superstars of controversial slavery film.
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How Hollywood Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Race - Businessweek

How Hollywood Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Race - Businessweek | Django | Scoop.it
How Hollywood Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Race
Businessweek
Last year saw films with racial themes like Beasts of the Southern Wild and Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained strike box office gold while scoring boatloads of Oscar nominations.
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Should a Film Try to Depict Slavery? - New Yorker (blog)

Should a Film Try to Depict Slavery? - New Yorker (blog) | Django | Scoop.it
New Yorker (blog)
Should a Film Try to Depict Slavery?
New Yorker (blog)
In “Django Unchained,” Quentin Tarantino presents the figure of the house slave (played by Samuel L.
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Quentin Tarantino defends depiction of slavery in Django Unchained

Quentin Tarantino defends depiction of slavery in Django Unchained | Django | Scoop.it
Director tells Bafta audience that, violent as his revenge western may be, the reality of slavery in the deep south was 'far worse'...

Via Simon Bray
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The Revenge Fantasy: Django Unchained vs. 12 Years a Slave

The Revenge Fantasy: Django Unchained vs. 12 Years a Slave | Django | Scoop.it
Many critics are praising 12 Years a Slave for its uncompromising honesty about slavery.

Via Thomas Faltin
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What art says about the past - Washington Post

What art says about the past - Washington Post | Django | Scoop.it
Boston Globe
What art says about the past
Washington Post
He doesn't focus on an institution or, as in Quentin Tarantino's somewhat cartoonish “Django Unchained,” on cruel whites but on the effect of slavery on a single black man.
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The Accents of Cinema: DJANGO UNCHAINED (Dir. Quentin Tarantino, 2012, US) - Re-imagining Slavery [Major Spoilers]

The Accents of Cinema: DJANGO UNCHAINED (Dir. Quentin Tarantino, 2012, US) - Re-imagining Slavery [Major Spoilers] | Django | Scoop.it

The exponential critical discourse on Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained poses an equally difficult task for anyone who wishes to write comprehensively about the film since it is ongoing, myriad like and most significantly caught up in a tide of reactionary criticism that threatens to obfuscate debates predicated on race and violence. Whatever I am about to say about this film has to be contextualised within a discourse that is both contemporary and immediate. Sometimes, looking back at a film with some critical distance is usually one of the least problematic and most objective ways of trying to determine the cultural worth of a film. Django Unchained is currently being discussed as part of a wider filmic interest in slavery but both this and Spielberg’s Lincolnare films written and directed by white middle class film artists, thus posing important questions to do with representation. Although Tarantino has previously made films with black characters, mainly played by Samuel L Jackson, Spielberg’s experience with slavery in terms of his film career has been more direct and visible; The ColourPurple and Amistad testifies to his interests in dealing with the guilt of America’s past crimes. What follows are observations which are not necessarily debating an existing discourse but instead trying to delineate critical junctures which could prove to be valuable in separating fact from fiction.


Via JW
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Shackles and Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America's ... - Truth-Out

Shackles and Ivy: The Secret History of How Slavery Helped Build America's ... - Truth-Out | Django | Scoop.it

A new book 10 years in the making examines how many major U.S. universities — Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown, Dartmouth, Rutgers, Williams and the University of North Carolina, among others — are drenched in the sweat, and sometimes the blood, of Africans brought to the United States as slaves. In "Ebony & Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities," Massachusetts Institute of Technology American history professor Craig Steven Wilder reveals how the slave economy and higher education grew up together. "When you think about the colonial world, until the American Revolution, there is only one college in the South, William & Mary ... The other eight colleges were all Northern schools, and they’re actually located in key sites, for the most part, of the merchant economy where the slave traders had come to power and rose as the financial and intellectual backers of new culture of the colonies," Wilder says.

 


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