DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine
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DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine
Work as if you live in the early days of a better nation
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Edinburgh the perfect city right now for Hibs' Ryan McGivern - Scotsman (blog)

Edinburgh the perfect city right now for Hibs' Ryan McGivern - Scotsman (blog) | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
Scotsman (blog) Edinburgh the perfect city right now for Hibs' Ryan McGivern Scotsman (blog) “The Northern Ireland manager [former Hibs player Michael O'Neill, who lives in Edinburgh] is on my doorstep as well, so it enhances my chances there as...
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Ofcom awards six new community radio licences in Scotland

Ofcom awards six new community radio licences in Scotland | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
January 17, 2013 Ofcom has today announced the award of six new community radio licences for services in Scotland. Community radio services are provided on a not-for-profit basis focusing on the de...
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Resurgence • Resurgence

Resurgence • Resurgence | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it

Welcome to Resurgence, where you’ll find positive, informed and original perspectives on environmental issues, engaged activism, philosophy, arts and ethical living.


To start the New Year we take on the big challenges and the big obstacles, starting with the oil industry and what we’re really up against. Environmentalist Lester Brown asks whether it is too late to avoid a complete breakdown in the food industry and we feature Sebastião Salgado’s new exhibition on our disappearing wilderness.

This issue brings together change-makers working to restore the balance and presents practical solutions to tackle our environmental crisis: local currency initiatives, renewable energy strategies, national schemes to restore land to wildlands in the Netherlands and more.

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Aapl, Goog & Msft in class war - Companies in the running for share of £60m contract

Aapl, Goog & Msft in class war - Companies in the running for share of £60m contract | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
Four companies are being touted by educators as possible contenders to provide tablet PCs for educational purposes in Scotland.
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Video Happening in Leith

Projected onto Lambs House with rush hour traffic
3MenInABlog's insight:

Nae Even a Ruf Cut | Mair tae follae

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Thursday, at 6pm we (KSLD) are projecting a little christmas animation onto Lambs House in Leith

Tomorrow night, thats Thursday, at 6pm at Lambs House in Leith we (KSLD) are projecting a little christmas animation onto the outside of the beautiful old Merchant building which Groves-Raines Architects have restored into a family home and place of business. There will be some hot drinks and general festive cheeryness. The animation is 5 minutes long so there hopefully wont be any cases of frostbite!
3MenInABlog's insight:

Tomorrow night, thats Thursday, at 6pm at Lambs House in Leith we (KSLD) are projecting a little christmas animation onto the outside of the beautiful old Merchant building which Groves-Raines Architects have restored into a family home and place of business. There will be some hot drinks and general festive cheeryness. The animation is 5 minutes long so there hopefully wont be any cases of frostbite!


Please feel free to bring along any friends, family, colleagues. The Groves-Raines kids seem to like it so if you have any children please feel free to bring them along too.
We hope you can come!
Please wrap up warm!
Best wishes
Claire and the KSLD team.

Claire HopeLighting Designer
KSLD4 Baltic StreetEdinburghEH6 7BW tel: +44 (0)131 555 5553twitter: @ClaireEHope 
Explore our projects at www.ksld.com  and our adventures at the KSLD facebook community page. 

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Britain's political class clings to the delusion that growth will return | Suzanne Moore

Britain's political class clings to the delusion that growth will return | Suzanne Moore | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it

Why is Britain's political class clinging to the delusion that growth will return?
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Meanwhile, with the autumn statement the rich rejig forecasts to slash the income of the poor
After delivering his autumn statement: George Osborne might as well have said he is going to live for ever.
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Suzanne Moore
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I am getting ready to party like it's 2017, aren't you? For that, according to the smirking Gideon, is when austerity ends. Whoopee! I just can't wait for everything in the garden to be lovely again, not just sprouts of recovery but vines of prosperity with megabucks cascading everywhere, because ... because ... well, I don't know ... because of all the things that we will make and sell to Germany? Or China? Or some great new technology that we have invented that makes us rich and makes climate change go away?

Listening to the autumn statement sent me into such a trance, I became nostalgic for the abseiling lesbians who once livened things up in the House of Commons, but I am not alone in this. To buy any of this economic downgrading/upgrading, one has to partake of the collective delusion about the return of "growth". George Osborne might as well have said he is going to live for ever. So, parliament holds its breath and argues over the minutiae of how we may recreate a bubble that was burst by more than one little prick quite some time ago.

Ah, that bubble of hope where resources are not finite, recession not global and the elixir of growth will be found at the end of the rainbow. Fool's gold indeed.

Underpinning this notion of non-stop growth is the idea of "progress", but as China's exports fall and its system remains intensely anti-democratic, this belief is surely unsustainable. Nonetheless, we plough through these economic forecasts as they are rejigged by the rich to slash the incomes of the poor. This is fantasy politics of the highest order and the fantasy is maintained by those sheltered from the effects of these divisive policies.

Which politician will stand up and tell the truth? This may be as good as it gets. For some, it certainly is. If you are middle-aged, in work and own property, it isn't bad. If you are young, unemployed, want a place of your own, and have young kids, you will know what austerity means. The veil between these worlds should by now be in tatters; instead it is wrapped as tight as a blindfold. Posh restaurants are full, house prices are huge, CEOs are still on massive salaries. It is possible to move in such circles and see deprivation only through a car windscreen.

And this screen always reflects this idea that growth will return. This is the wreckage that our political class clings to, as if it were the only answer to our woes. We could instead have a conversation about what happens if it doesn't, as is increasingly likely, actually materialise.

We could remain in denial: perhaps, unlike say India, we have just "lost" our ability to take risks. We should all live some Alan Sugar/Shopping Channel existence, work harder, and those on benefits will have to be somehow fiscally contracted, as they have chosen to be poor. This model depends on refiguring inequality precisely in the name of this spurious "growth".

Or we could look at Japan, where neoliberalism has crumbled and the links between economic stagnation and social malaise become circular. Profound alienation occurs when those who have been encouraged to create their identities via consumerism can no longer do so. The work ethic itself becomes meaningless. Indeed, the endless exhortations to work hard aimed at our unemployed youth, here or in Greece or Spain, are just gibbering into a void.

But then a politics that faced the end of growth would have to take on mass delusion. It would talk about how we are to live with depleted resources. It might, as many have argued, involve a move back from global to local production to increase jobs. It might mean work being more evenly spread out between age groups, and it would deal with inequality because the costs of it are too high. Economic downsizing always sounds hippyish. We may have to buy less and make more. We may have to factor in care of the old, the ill, the young, as part of the economy and not continue to see it as undermining it. The alternative, though, and this is still where we are at, is to be mired in nostalgia for the world of the maxed-out credit card.

If Labour cannot say "growth" is over, we have no effective challenge to the fallacy that it can go on for ever. Policy is what is stalled. To say austerity is the status quo would be seen as drowning not waving.

What do we say to those who know this to be the case, those experiencing the permanent adolescence of being unable to leave home, those with the stress of the temporary contract, those who protest or emigrate to find work? Those who are crushed because economic growth – even a tiny bit – is an impossible dream in their own lives? Do we say: don't worry, it will all be fine in a few years when the great recovery arrives? I think not. The future has arrived already. But I am afraid it has gone to bed early as it was cold but could not afford to put the heating on.

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Footballer Anthony Stokes joins Real IRA supporters at party for slain terror chief

Footballer Anthony Stokes joins Real IRA supporters at party for slain terror chief | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
THE striker attended the bash for Alan...
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Guardian newspaper accused of manipulating article on Catalan independence

Guardian newspaper accused of manipulating article on Catalan independence | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it

"Although the UK media is overwhelmingly opposed to Scottish independence, the distortions and biased coverage of the Guardian and Observer are a particular bitter pill.

The Scottish Yes campaign solidly aligns itself with civic - not ethnic - nationalism, social and liberal democracy, resistance to the cuts agenda of the Westminster parties, internationalism, and opposition to nuclear weapons - all of which are values which the Guardian and Observer claim to espouse and defend."

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We can go oil the way on independence

We can go oil the way on independence | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
We can go oil the way on independence
Fuel cash less vital than in Norway, say Nats
Oil Revenue ... oil only accounts for a fifth of Scotland's income
By MARK McLAUGHLIN

SCOTLAND can succeed as an independent nation because we rely LESS on oil revenue than Norway, the SNP claimed last night.

Nats chiefs said figures showed North Sea revenues made up just a fifth of our annual income in the last decade.

That compared to 36½ per cent for the crude-rich Scandinavians, according to their stats.

They insisted the figures blew a “major hole” in pro-Union claims the Scots economy is too oil-dependent.

MSP Maureen Watt said: “Anti-independence politicians make bizarre claims that having a major natural resource to call on is somehow a bad thing.

“If that’s the case how do they explain the success of Norway which is significantly more reliant on its oil and gas?

“You’d struggle to find anyone prepared to criticise the strength of their economy.” The Scottish Parliament Information Centre stats showed Scotland raised £45billion in taxes and £8billion from oil revenues in the year 2010/11. Norway raked in £94billion in taxation and £39billion in oil money.

But Green MSP Patrick Harvie said Scotland should stop “chasing after every last drop of oil” and look to renewables instead.

He said: “What independence offers is the chance to speed up the shift away from oil and on to clean energy.”

Last night a spokesman for the Better Together campaign said: “Only in the confused world of nationalism could having up to one fifth of your economy reliant on a finite, volatile resource be considered good news

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A week is a long time in Gaza. Or, how the BBC covered 38 consecutive breaking news stories …

A week is a long time in Gaza. Or, how the BBC covered 38 consecutive breaking news stories … | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
Analysis by Kevin Williamson The BBC’s reporting on the current conflict in Gaza has been subject to claim and counter-claim of bias from pro-Palestinian and pro-Israeli camps.  Surely they c...
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Greener Leith use leaked documents in fight to get cycle lanes on Leith Walk | Edinburgh Innertube Map

Greener Leith use leaked documents in fight to get cycle lanes on Leith Walk | Edinburgh Innertube Map | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it

Greener Leith use leaked documents in fight to get cycle lanes on Leith Walk

19 November 2012, 01.50 AM

For months the environmental and community blog Greener Leith has been campaigning to get proper segregated cycle lanes included in the planned re-modelling and re-surfacing of Leith Walk. In a recent survey of local opinion called a Vision for Leith Walk, this proved the most popular idea.

Despite having a budget of £5.5 million to spend on the work, the council have been resistant to the idea of segregated lanes, saying that it would be too costly and complicated. But they had drafted more modest plans for a protected cycle lane from Pilrig Street to Picardy Place, which were shown to community groups including Greener Leith in September.

Now, In the latest stage of the campaign, Greener Leith have published leaked council documents that they say show that the that even this modest cycle lane is being scaled back. Apparently the only protected cycle lane will be between the two roundabouts at the top of Leith Walk – a distance of about 100 metres.

This comes only a few days after the city hosted the Dutch Ambassador at the annual Cycling Scotland Conference – at which City council cycling leader Councillor Jim Orr told delegates that Edinburgh should look to the Netherlands for inspiration in meeting its goal of boosting cycling rates.

Yet as this video shows, Holland invested massively in segregated cycling infrastructure, starting in the 1970s, following mass public protests over deaths of cyclists on the roads.

Setting an example for the city

In my personal opinion, whilst what happens with Leith Walk may be most important to Leithers, really this is a issue of citywide importance. Leith Walk is going to be remodelled and resurfaced anyway – but this could be an exemplar route to see how good cycling infrastructure can change an area for the better, and help show us how we could trasform other areas of the city in the future.

And whilst the council may not have budget for the more complicated options, there may be creative but cheaper ways to create a safe cycling route - such as one side of Leith Walk having a much wider cycling and pedestrian pavement.

If you'd like to show your support for Greener Leith's campaign, you can email SNP Councillor Jim Orr jim.orr@edinburgh.gov.uk or Labour Councillor Lesley Hinds, the Transport Convenor lesley.hinds@edinburgh.gov.uk

Alternatively, if you'd like to make a comment below, we'll make sure they get forwarded on to the council.

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Steve Bell on Tony Blair and William Hague's role in Israel-Gaza clash – cartoon

Steve Bell on Tony Blair and William Hague's role in Israel-Gaza clash – cartoon | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu claims support of Tony Blair, while William Hague places blame for situation on Hamas...
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Conservation body discovers book of radical plans for Edinburgh circa 1949 - Edinburgh Evening News

Conservation body discovers book of radical plans for Edinburgh circa 1949 - Edinburgh Evening News | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
Edinburgh Evening News Conservation body discovers book of radical plans for Edinburgh circa 1949 Edinburgh Evening News A STARTLING series of snapshots of Edinburgh as imagined by city planners in 1949 have emerged featuring a motorway running...
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Woodchip imports 'should be banned to stop ash dieback' - Telegraph

Woodchip imports 'should be banned to stop ash dieback' - Telegraph | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
Ministers have been urged to consider banning the import of woodchip made from ash as part of measures to prevent the spread of ash dieback disease.
3MenInABlog's insight:

Biomass importers at risk?

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Video Happening in Leith

Video Happening in Leith | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
KSLD projected a little christmas animation onto the outside of Lambs House ..the beautiful old Merchant building in Leith Groves-Raines Architects have restored it into a family home and place of ...
3MenInABlog's insight:

A delightful outdoor presentation was projected onto the oldest house in Leith.

We were also treated to a tour of the wonderfully restored house by the owners.

The background noise is rush hour traffic.

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Crime writers plot novel ways to raise funds for forensic ... - The Times

Crime writers plot novel ways to raise funds for forensic ... - The Times | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
A 'million for a morgue' campaign is aimed at creating state-of-the-art forensic research laboratories at the University of Dundee.
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Largest container ship visits UK

Largest container ship visits UK | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
The world's largest container ship arrives in Southampton as part of its first visit to Europe.
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Scottish Review: Margo MacDonald and other victims of the creepy compliment

Scottish Review: Margo MacDonald and other victims of the creepy compliment | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it

Margo MacDonald and other victims of the creepy compliment
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Kenneth Roy
*****************

One of the incidental curiosities of reading the Hansard record of a House of Commons debate on the Clyde Port Authority (Hunterston Ore Terminal) Order Confirmation Bill (11 December 1973) – it's odd what I get up to, really – was to see Margo MacDonald compared favourably to a nuclear power station. The power station – Hunterston 'A' – is being decommissioned. The member for Govan, as she then was, battles on.

On 11 December 1973 she delivered her maiden speech in parliament, a few weeks after her stunning by-election victory for the SNP in one of Labour's heartland seats. She was 29, a former teacher of physical education, and the wife of the landlord of the Hoolet's Nest in High Blantyre. She and her first husband and their two young daughters lived in a flat above the pub. Margo said after her unexpected triumph that it had not been her ambition to be an MP and that she would rather sit in a Scottish parliament. She did – 26 years later.

A maiden speech is an occasion for honourable members, setting political differences aside, to say nice things about the debut of the new boy or girl. Mrs MacDonald's speech was unusually short, a model of brevity at around 700 words, and very much to the point. But from the Labour side, some of the tributes were muted, if not downright chilly. The party's rising star, Jim Sillars, had nothing to say in praise of the speech but confined himself to 'welcoming the conversion of at least one member – I put it no higher – of the Scottish National Party to the campaign for the development of Hunterston'. Relations between the member for Govan and the member for South Ayrshire thawed sufficiently for the two of them to marry each other some years later.

But to read the other personal references to Margo MacDonald that night is to be reminded of how much the world has changed since 1973. Prepare to blush as we re-visit a few of them:

T G D Galbraith (Conservative, Glasgow Hillhead): 'If all that I heard did not please my ears, everything that my eye saw was a delight'.

George Younger (Conservative, Ayr): 'I hope that I shall not be misunderstood when I say that I hope to meet her here often'.

William Ross (Labour, Kilmarnock): 'Hers was one of the best speeches that we have seen here for a long time – and I say "seen" quite rightly'.

J Dickson Mabon (Labour, Greenock): 'The Hon Gentleman said that it was necessary in almost all circumstances to have beauty and the beast. Certainly she is the beauty'.

And the beast? Well, that was Hunterston 'A' nuclear power station. To say nothing of the ore terminal on the same site, and the petro-chemical plant, and the oil refinery, and the steel works, most of which never materialised. Reading Hansard cold 39 years later, the short-sightedness of the vision for Scotland's economic future is striking. But it's the overt sexism, the unmistakable nudge-nudge from the ranks of the suits, which leaps more immediately from the page. Though only by the standards of today.

Outside the dinosaur environments of certain male-only Burns suppers and the 'sportsman's dinner', no-one now would dare to define women in public life – or women in general – by their physical appearance. That form of sexism belongs in the same 1970s' dustbin as ore terminals, Carry On films, and the collected speeches of Edward Heath.

But if the war against one ism has been largely won, it seems that the war against another is still being fought.

May I introduce you to Alfred Throop? Mr Throop was a passenger on an Arriva bus in Leicester last week when the vehicle began swaying from side to side. 'There's something wrong here', he thought, percipiently enough. Sure enough, the driver was having a funny turn. Our hero grabbed the wheel and steered the bus to safety. Mr Throop is now being held up as an example of what can be achieved by 'a brave pensioner' – as the BBC and the newspapers insist on calling him.

A brave pensioner, indeed. Mr Throop is 67. Hey, ain't he old?

One newspaper discovered that he is a grandfather as well as a pensioner. Another described him as an OAP. Imagine it. There's this ancient geezer Throop, pensioner and grand-daddy, the type that need help to get themselves dressed in the morning, barely ambulant with assistance, meals on wheels, just about ready for the zimmer frame, and amazingly there's one of them on this Arriva bus, being all heroic, and at his age.

Odd, though, that there is discrimination even within the discriminatory practice of ageism. When Harry Redknapp, aged 65, joined QPR last week he did a brave thing – take one look at QPR if you doubt me – but he wasn't described anywhere as a brave pensioner. When Tony Hall joins the BBC next March he too will be doing a brave thing – take one look at the BBC if you doubt me – and in the week of his 62nd birthday at that, so our Tony is not far off being a brave pensioner himself. In fact, he's already claiming a pension from the BBC and will bravely go on doing so even when he is picking up a big fat cheque for being DG.

If we must define Alfred Throop as a brave pensioner, is there not a case for every reference to Lord Hall and Harry Redknapp to be prefaced in the same way? Or how about me? I have a vested interest in this matter: I too have reached the age and status of a brave pensioner, marvelling at my ability to totter up the stairs of Liberator House unaided. If I loathe the whole idea of age and gender stereotyping, I suspect it's because I've become vulnerable to a bit of it myself.

But then I remember what it must have been like in the House of Commons on the night of Margo MacDonald's maiden speech, when it was still possible for a woman MP to be compared favourably to a nuclear power station.

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Malt and Barley Review: The John Rebus whisky drinking game - The Caledonian Mercury

Malt and Barley Review: The John Rebus whisky drinking game - The Caledonian Mercury | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
November 26th, 2012 0
Malt and Barley Review: The John Rebus whisky drinking game
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by Tom Morton
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Having finished and thoroughly enjoyed Ian Rankin’s latest novel, Standing in Another Man’s Grave, I was surfing a wave of self-regarding pleasure at the mention of ‘Dolphinsludge’ – a word I invented years ago in my Scotsman column as a pseudonym for lovely Inverness – and the fact that (former) Detective Chief Inspector John Rebus apparently listens, or has listened, to my BBC Radio Scotland show.

Be that as it may, never in reading a Rankin book have I been so struck by Rebus’s affection for whisky. This is due in part to SIAMG’s geographical scope: Rebus makes several road trips in the novel, from his beloved Edinburgh to the far north of Scotland, along the A9, the infamous road which is crucial to the serial-killer plot. Incidentally, the hardback – available at half list price on Amazon – comes with lovely end-paper colour maps of the Highlands. A case for not Kindling. On the various journeys, he tends to ‘salute’ the distilleries he passes. And quite right.

There is, of course, plenty of beer, too, and a smattering of vodka. Good old Deuchar’s IPA for the most part, when it comes to ale. And a great deal of music, for Rebus (and Rankin) are both inveterate rock fans, especially in the form of traditional, analogue vinyl records. Though of course Rebus listens to CDs in his car, a venerable Saab he has a slightly worrying tendency to talk to and occasionally pat.

It struck me that a SIAMG drinking game could be a useful adjunct to, say, a book group taking on the novel or perhaps a solo re-reading. And providing a proper soundtrack of the actual records or artists mentioned in the book would accompany that rather effectively. Or, you could simply reflect on the book without re-reading it, just listening to the music and drinking. A Spotify playlist may be the easiest way of achieving this.

To save time, here’s a handy guide. It should be said from the start that the title of the book is what’s called a ‘Mondegreen’, a mishearing of a song lyric. The name comes from The Bonny Earl o’ Moray, and the verse which goes:
Ye Highlands and ye Lowlands,
Oh, where hae ye been?
They hae slain the Earl O’ Moray,
And Lady Mondegreen.

Or indeed ‘laid him on the green’. Rebus mishears the song ‘Standing in Another Man’s Rain’ by the late Jackie Leven (a Fifer, like both Rebus and Rankin) as ‘Standing in Another Man’s Grave’. This becomes one of the novel’s recurring motifs. Indeed, a Jackie Leven album – I still think the early The Mystery of Love Is Greater Than The Mystery of Death is his best – should be on standby at all times, as Leven lyrics are used as subtitles for each section of the book.

We are quickly on to other musicians, though, indeed we are listening (with Rebus) to music before any whisky gets consumed. Bert Jansch (solo), Pentangle with John Renbourn, John Renbourn solo and collaboration of the Incredible String Band’s Robin Williamson with Renbourn as well. Then there’s Rory Gallagher and Van Morrison before we even get to the first unnamed whisky, possibly a blend.

Musically, we then begin a long run of Led Zeppelin references, as one of the cops involved is a James Page, as in Zep guitarist Jimmy. . He is referred to jokingly at various times as Physical Graffitti, Communication Breakdown, Custard Pie (a Page and Plant song, post Zeppelin) Trampled Underfoot and then, once again (an in-joke, this, as earlier long-term sidekick Siobhan Clarke has challenged Rebus not to run out of Zeppelin song titles) as Physical Graffitti .

Music that is actually played, though, continues with Kate Bush (the extremely strange song Misty, which involves, well, a girl and a snowman), Jackie Leven again, and a trip to Pilochry, where salutes are given to Edradour, and the Blair Atholl Distillery, which is referred to several times as Bell’s (Blair Athol is the signature malt in the Bell’s blend and Blair Athol has a Bell’s ‘Visitor Experience’).

Back in Edinburgh, some Glenlivet is drunk (and paid for) an unnamed dram is consumed at a posh hotel, then another, before we’re heading back up north again. Tips of the Rebus bunnet go to Tomatin, Dalwhinnie Glenmorangie, Glen Ord and Dalmore, but not, curiously, to the whisky made in the village of Edderton – a location crucial to the plot and visited several times. That would be Balblair, and very nice it is too.
More whisky is consumed without it being named – frustratingly, we do not hear about the Dornoch Castle Hotel’s ‘good range of malts’ other than that Rebus had ‘one too many’. Then there’s a mention of anCnoc, over to the east.

More music, please: The venerable Michael Chapman (Fully Qualified Survivor is the album to have) and Spooky Tooth, a late 60s psychedelic blues rock combo. Time for another mention of Tomatin, two more anonymous drams, and an imaginary mix tape for one more journey to the Highlands that might include ‘songs about roads’ from Canned Heat. the Rolling Stones, Manfred Mann and the Doors. Rebus is showing his age here, perhaps longing for the security of nostalgia…

And there’s more golden oldies: Maggie Bell, formerly of the great Stone the Crows. Bert Jansch again, the Stones and Gerry Rafferty, at which point we discover that Rebus’s home dram of choice appears to be Highland Park. We’ll assume it’s the 12-year-old, one of the best made and best value mianstream whiskies you can buy. Quick, put on Nazareth, John Martyn and (oh no!) “some early Wishbone Ash”. Ah well. Nobody’s perfect.

And apart from mentions of Bell’s and Dewar’s World of Whisky, that’s about it. Rebus finishes the dregs of his Highland Park straight from the bottle, and then the books fades out on Jackie Leven.

As must we. All I can say is, make those drams very small ones if you wish to take on the entire SIAMG drinking/listening game in a single session. Not everyone has the capacities of John Rebus.

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Not Better Together, say unions | The Sunday Times |

Not Better Together, say unions | The Sunday Times | | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it

T HE campaign to save the union has suffered a setback with the voice of Scotland’s trade union movement refusing to join Better Together, the cross-party group fighting against independence.

 

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Sunday Times Scottish State Secondary School of the Year » Boroughmuir Parents

Sunday Times Scottish State Secondary School of the Year » Boroughmuir Parents | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
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Victim chased attackers for a mile through streets of Edinburgh

Victim chased attackers for a mile through streets of Edinburgh | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
The 30-year-old was punched in the face and robbed as he walked through the Meadows.
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Steve Bell on Tony Blair and William Hague's role in Israel-Gaza clash – cartoon

Steve Bell on Tony Blair and William Hague's role in Israel-Gaza clash – cartoon | DJ.Womble Daily - Magazine | Scoop.it
Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu claims support of Tony Blair, while William Hague places blame for situation on Hamas...
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