diversity in schools
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Diversity and Higher Education: Our Communities Need More Than "Narrowly Tailored" Solutions

Diversity and Higher Education: Our Communities Need More Than "Narrowly Tailored" Solutions | diversity in schools | Scoop.it
At the risk of distracting us from devising appropriately "narrowly tailored" means for increasing diversity in higher education guided by the Fisher decision, I'd like to suggest we step back from our law books, databases, and spreadsheets and...
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

This article is so fascinating because it touches upon social mobility through the educational system. It address the fact that not many lower-income students attend secondary education- especially public or private universities- if anything they continue on to community college. While all universities have a minimum number or minority students they must admit, there is still a large gap. This article advocated to really dive into lower-income areas and help students realize their potential to that they may continue on in their education, become successful, and make a difference. It addresses the imporance of "building communities and cultivating talent" byt teaching into "geographies of opportunity where new talent is growing fast but current opportunities to cultivate the net diverse generation are scare."

I think the reason this gap exists is because many lower-income students feel like they can't apply to a higher education institution because they can't afford it, or no one in their family has ever gone on to do that, or it's just not realistic. The idea that institutions should go out of their way to go into communities and look for talent is so fascinating to me. This could give students the idea that, hey, you know, I really am worth it and I can go on to college. Maybe this is just the motivation they need? 

The article then discusses a program that New York and Syracuse University have adapted with the help of many private donors. They're providing the money for scholarships and tuitions to afford these students the opportunity. Though I understand there's only so many students this can help, I think it's a start. If we can create a culture that promotes lower- income educational success with one student, it will have a domino effect and people will feel inspired to go on and do the same. 

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Slam Poet Slams Standardized Education | Breaking the Stage

Abby Martin features a performance by Malachi Byrd of DC Youth Slam and Split this Rock, discussing his inspiration for the poem 'Intelligence' and the issue...
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I absolutely love this piece of slam poetry. I had to watch it about five times because there was just SO much meaning behind literally every sentence he said that I couldn't keep up with it. I had to listen, pause, digest, and replay the video mulitple times to truly even begin to appreciate it.

I struggled with where to place this video- under my diversity curation or my standardized testing. But I think the bigger picture is the diversity aspect of it. He touches on the detrimental effects of having standardized education and the rigid distinctions it creates for such a broad, diverse system. This can almost be seen as diversity in itself- or the lack thereof. We are making schools one dimensional by standardizing the system and elimating the diversity that could exist in teaching methods- like that of technological incorporation or project based leraning. He points out that there is more than one way to define intelligence- that it is not defined in test scores.

Byrd then brings in the point that Stphanie Grace, an ivy league graduate says that blacks are "genetically inferior, less intelligent than whites." I love his response to this. He uses many plays on words to say basically, "you fell victim to the standardization of the system". He says that "we [African Americans] are warriors." He points out that African Americans triumped in more ways that just passing a test, and for that his ancestors are intelligent and he is intelligent. Byrd goes on to defend the ways of his people. 

This video is truly amazing.

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Bianca Lea Iacono's curator insight, December 12, 2013 5:33 PM

 

I was so impressed with this video and truly inspired by the words of Malachi Byrd. Malachi expresses his opinion about the education system and its flaws. He starts out his poem by saying, “the American school system and consequently the American public define intelligence as 2400 SAT, 36 ACT, 4.0 GPA…” Although sad and unfortunate, a person’s intellect and ability to learn ARE based on these numbers. How can one determine intelligence based on a standardized test? We are all different learners and all have different learning styles. How can one test determine our ability to learn or how smart we are? These tests turn us into statistics and numbers and eliminate our identities. Malachi goes on to recite that the common application “transforms you from a sweetheart to a statistic,” and that people “let the score on the ACT act as their only identifier.” There is so much emphasis on these grades and these tests that education isn’t about obtaining and absorbing knowledge, its about drilling and memorizing and spitting out senseless things that you forget a week later. There are so many successful people in this world that never took the SAT’s or attended college who are extremely intelligent.

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HoogewerffEDCI280

HoogewerffEDCI280 | diversity in schools | Scoop.it
Checking Boxes and Filling Blanks: Diversity and Inclusion in Children’s Literature Guest post by educator and writer, Cory Silverberg.
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I think this graphic symbolizes a really important aspect of our education system: children's literature is not an accurate representation of the children in our schools. With whites becoming the minority in America in the forseeable future, we still lack the proper literature that incorporates a broad range of cultures in the classroom. This gap in diversity in children's literature is problematic since it then does not give a voice to these children. There are no Asian American protagonists with whom a student in your classroom can relate with. This causes a student to lose interest in reading early on and can then go on to have detrimental effects on their learning experience as a whole.

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I Wish I Were More Surprised At What A Student Exposed About His School, But I'm Not

I Wish I Were More Surprised At What A Student Exposed About His School, But I'm Not | diversity in schools | Scoop.it
A ridiculously unacceptable fact about a certain college that I fear is true all over.
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

*disclaimer: video preview photo has nothing to do with video*

A friend of mine posted this on Facebook a few days ago, and I was instantly drawn to it- this video was so moving. At such a huge school, you'd assume there would be more diversity, however, these students bring the facts to the front and prove us wrong. 

I just assume that we're more of a diverse education system because that's what we'd like to believe, however, it's really sad that we haven't actually come as far as we wish we would. I come to the conclusion that the gap in diversity in our education system is largely due to our history. Minority groups have been historically suppressed and not afforded an education, so it's not until now that these indiviuduals can make strides in that direction. Slavery of African Americans, for example, did not allow these individuals an education, so it's now that they are making up for lost time, which is why there is such a gap. This is disheartening because it displays the harsh reality that slavery, something that seems so distant and in the past to us, is still having drastic effects in society today- particularly in our education system. 

The stylistics of this video was was drew me in- I could hear the passion in his voice. The poetic nature to it made it that more enticing.

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Why I Hate School But Love Education||Spoken Word

The Latest Spoken Word Video from Suli Breaks. PURCHASE ON ITUNES: http://goo.gl/ZhqVl SUBSCRIBE: http://goo.gl/6mf0j TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/sulibre...
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I am so in awe with this video. I think there is so much to gain from the message behind Suli Breaks words. They are so inspiring and so meaningful, and you can hear the passion in his voice. I decided to group this under diversity in schools because it has to do with people and how the choose to learn differently and what they choose to get out of going to school. This directly relates to diversity of the students. Some may be strictly grade oriented and very hung up on test scores, however, there will be some who are the complete opposite and who find value in the social lessons and experiences they obtain through schooling. The key is to knowing what your students require as individuals and tailoring to their needs.

One quote that really stuck with me was "education is about inspiring one's mind, not just filling their head." I think this is so true and that our job as teachers is not to overload these students with facts and numbers and statistics and data and ask them to regurgitate it back to us. There is SO much more the learning than that. Being educated is being smart, and being curious, and being clueless but having that thirst for knowledge and going out there and obtaining it. I think it's a concept that often gets lost in the mess of grading and standards and requirements that is our education system, but is something valuble that deserves attention.

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Bianca Lea Iacono's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:32 PM

I am obsessed with this video and absolutely in love with how he raises issues about education through his slam poetry. “Do you want a degree? Why? Let me tell you what society will tell you. It increases your chances of getting a job, provides you with an opportunity to be successful, life will be a lot less stressful. Education is the key.” He then goes on to name famous people such as Steve jobs (net worth 7 billion), Richard Branson (4.2 billion), Oprah Winfrey  (2.7 billion), etc. and states that none of them have ever graduated from a higher learning institution, “were either people unsuccessful, or uneducated?” he asks. His poetry is inspirational and really touches upon several problems within education today. He continues to talk about exams and says, “are you aware that examiners have a check list, and if your answer is something outside of the box, the automatic responses across, and then they claim that school expands your horizons and your visions. Well tell that to Malcolm X, who dropped out of school, and is well renowned for what he learned in prisons.” We claim that schools are supposed to open our minds, expose us to different things and make us think. Unfortunately, school has become so centered around passing tests that we forget about expanding our horizons and visions. Education is about inspiring ones mind, not just filling their head.

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Nearly half the students from Hartford now attend integrated schools - The Connecticut Mirror

Nearly half the students from Hartford now attend integrated schools - The Connecticut Mirror | diversity in schools | Scoop.it
Nearly half the students from Hartford now attend integrated schools
The Connecticut Mirror
... to the definition of diversity” for magnet schools.
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

I was excited to read about this topic because it's something I have first hand experience with in high school since I live in Connecticut only 15 minutes outside of Hartford. Driving through Hartford you see the vast segregation that this article talks about and that most smaller cities deal with. I played volleyball all throughout highschool and so when we'd travel to high schools in Hartford to play them, I saw first hand the issue that's discussed in this article: the overwhelming majority of students are African American or Latino. In a way, this is a lack of diversity in it's own sense. 

I grew up in Glastonbury, a very affluent suberb outsie of Hartford. Glastonbury High School partnered up with high schools in Hartford, just as this article discusses, in an attempt to move these students to more diverse, better educated school systems. I undertsand the need for this, however, saw some flaws in it myself. When these students from an inner city are transplanted into a high school like mine, which is so vastly different, they find that they cannot identify with many students so they end up hanging out in their own "clique." Doesn't this defeat the purpose of the program? Yes they are getting a better education and being exposed to diversity, but they are not taking part in diversity and branching out. 

I wonder if this issue should be approached from the opposite direction. Instead of pouring in all this money to transfer these students out of Hartford, why not invest time and money in the Hartford schools so that people from elsewhere want to attend them for a better education. This way you are attracting diverstiy into the school so you achieve the goal but in a different way. 

I think the article touches on this by talking about making these school Magnet Schools, however, that has been "in the works" for years in Connecticut and action has not yet been taken. 

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California High School Elects Lesbian Couple As Homecoming Queens

California High School Elects Lesbian Couple As Homecoming Queens | diversity in schools | Scoop.it
"I always say what we should educate people on is just respecting other people's differences."
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

This was inspiring to read, but I fear that it's one of those "fairy tail" stories because it isn't as apparant as it should be. Acceptance of not only lesbians, but anyone who breaks the "norm" should be something that is more valued in school systems. Students should never feel alienated because of who they are, and i think that clubs like GSA (Gay-Straight Alliance) are making strides in that direction. 

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Exclusive - Malala Yousafzai Extended Interview Pt. 1

Malala Yousafzai shares details of her run-in with the Taliban.
Emilie Hoogewerff's insight:

This was an incredibly inspiring video to watch. Not only does it talk about the troubles that ethnic cultures faces in the education system across the globe, but it specifically touches upon women and their denial to access education. I think it is extremely admirable of Malala to speak up and do everything in her power to fight against this injustice. One thing she said that really stuck out to me was, "You must fight others through peace and through dialogue and through education." This is humbling and a message that everyone can take something away from.

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