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Should biotech make life hellish for criminals? – Ross Andersen – Aeon

Should biotech make life hellish for criminals? – Ross Andersen – Aeon | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
Radical life extension would give humans the power to create an artificial hell for criminals. Should we?

Via Wildcat2030
Sinaia Sinai's insight:

Yes, brilliant read.

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Wildcat2030's curator insight, March 13, 8:23 AM

brilliant read..

Artur Alves's curator insight, March 18, 7:59 AM

Interview with Rachel Roache.

 

"I wanted to close by moving beyond imprisonment, to ask you about the future of punishment more broadly. Are there any alternative punishments that technology might enable, and that you can see on the horizon now? What surprising things might we see down the line?


Roache: We have been thinking a lot about surveillance and punishment lately. Already, we see governments using ankle bracelets to track people in various ways, and many of them are fairly elaborate. For instance, some of these devices allow you to commute to work, but they also give you a curfew and keep a close eye on your location. You can imagine this being refined further, so that your ankle bracelet bans you from entering establishments that sell alcohol. This could be used to punish people who happen to like going to pubs, or it could be used to reform severe alcoholics. Either way, technologies of this sort seem to be edging up to a level of behaviour control that makes some people uneasy, due to questions about personal autonomy.

It’s one thing to lose your personal liberty as a result of being confined in a prison, but you are still allowed to believe whatever you want while you are in there. In the UK, for instance, you cannot withhold religious manuscripts from a prisoner unless you have a very good reason. These concerns about autonomy become particularly potent when you start talking about brain implants that could potentially control behaviour directly. The classic example is Robert G Heath [a psychiatrist at Tulane University in New Orleans], who did this famously creepy experiment [in the 1950s] using electrodes in the brain in an attempt to modify behaviour in people who were prone to violent psychosis. The electrodes were ostensibly being used to treat the patients, but he was also, rather gleefully, trying to move them in a socially approved direction. You can really see that in his infamous [1972] paper on ‘curing’ homosexuals. I think most Western societies would say ‘no thanks’ to that kind of punishment.

To me, these questions about technology are interesting because they force us to rethink the truisms we currently hold about punishment. When we ask ourselves whether it’s inhumane to inflict a certain technology on someone, we have to make sure it’s not just the unfamiliarity that spooks us. And more importantly, we have to ask ourselves whether punishments like imprisonment are only considered humane because they are familiar, because we’ve all grown up in a world where imprisonment is what happens to people who commit crimes. Is it really OK to lock someone up for the best part of the only life they will ever have, or might it be more humane to tinker with their brains and set them free? When we ask that question, the goal isn’t simply to imagine a bunch of futuristic punishments – the goal is to look at today’s punishments through the lens of the future."

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Rescooped by Sinaia Sinai from Biblio
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If white characters were described like people of color in literature

If white characters were described like people of color in literature | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it

Welcome to the mocha-chocolate-coffee-bean-exotic-butterscotch-caramel-cinnamon-cafe-au-lait side of town.


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Scots charity worker racially abused on Glasgow street as she sleeps rough to raise money

Scots charity worker racially abused on Glasgow street as she sleeps rough to raise money | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
MHAIRI McDONALD was repeatedly targeted by passers-by on Sauchiehall Street and told to
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Roma day and April Fool's Day

Roma day and April Fool's Day | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
 Yeeeeeaaaaiiii – the day we celebrate the Gypsies! The best time for many to rediscover that imaginary Gypsy friend they hung out with, or the Gypsy child they generously helped, when they were yo...
Sinaia Sinai's insight:

Maybe Hitler didn’t kill enough of them [Gypsies].

         Gilles Bourdouleix – National Assembly, France 21 July 2013

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Should biotech make life hellish for criminals? – Ross Andersen – Aeon

Should biotech make life hellish for criminals? – Ross Andersen – Aeon | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
Radical life extension would give humans the power to create an artificial hell for criminals. Should we?

Via Wildcat2030
Sinaia Sinai's insight:

Yes, brilliant read.

more...
Wildcat2030's curator insight, March 13, 8:23 AM

brilliant read..

Artur Alves's curator insight, March 18, 7:59 AM

Interview with Rachel Roache.

 

"I wanted to close by moving beyond imprisonment, to ask you about the future of punishment more broadly. Are there any alternative punishments that technology might enable, and that you can see on the horizon now? What surprising things might we see down the line?


Roache: We have been thinking a lot about surveillance and punishment lately. Already, we see governments using ankle bracelets to track people in various ways, and many of them are fairly elaborate. For instance, some of these devices allow you to commute to work, but they also give you a curfew and keep a close eye on your location. You can imagine this being refined further, so that your ankle bracelet bans you from entering establishments that sell alcohol. This could be used to punish people who happen to like going to pubs, or it could be used to reform severe alcoholics. Either way, technologies of this sort seem to be edging up to a level of behaviour control that makes some people uneasy, due to questions about personal autonomy.

It’s one thing to lose your personal liberty as a result of being confined in a prison, but you are still allowed to believe whatever you want while you are in there. In the UK, for instance, you cannot withhold religious manuscripts from a prisoner unless you have a very good reason. These concerns about autonomy become particularly potent when you start talking about brain implants that could potentially control behaviour directly. The classic example is Robert G Heath [a psychiatrist at Tulane University in New Orleans], who did this famously creepy experiment [in the 1950s] using electrodes in the brain in an attempt to modify behaviour in people who were prone to violent psychosis. The electrodes were ostensibly being used to treat the patients, but he was also, rather gleefully, trying to move them in a socially approved direction. You can really see that in his infamous [1972] paper on ‘curing’ homosexuals. I think most Western societies would say ‘no thanks’ to that kind of punishment.

To me, these questions about technology are interesting because they force us to rethink the truisms we currently hold about punishment. When we ask ourselves whether it’s inhumane to inflict a certain technology on someone, we have to make sure it’s not just the unfamiliarity that spooks us. And more importantly, we have to ask ourselves whether punishments like imprisonment are only considered humane because they are familiar, because we’ve all grown up in a world where imprisonment is what happens to people who commit crimes. Is it really OK to lock someone up for the best part of the only life they will ever have, or might it be more humane to tinker with their brains and set them free? When we ask that question, the goal isn’t simply to imagine a bunch of futuristic punishments – the goal is to look at today’s punishments through the lens of the future."

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Being blind for a day in Bucharest - YouTube

*This is not a prank or a mock-up. Impaired people are having a hard life here in Romania, since social services are a complete joke and facilities of any ki...
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Brilliant Award-Winning Romanian Tourism Campaign

Brilliant Award-Winning Romanian Tourism Campaign | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
A perfect response to negative comments about Romanian immigration by the British government.

Via Hirinuca
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Humorous answer to discrimination.

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Hirinuca's curator insight, September 27, 2013 6:48 AM

Love this !!! When are we having this in France ???

Francois Adoue's curator insight, December 13, 2013 10:00 AM

Une campagne pour développer le tourisme en Roumanie qui a été élue comme une des meilleures campagnes de promotion ! 

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DNA at 60

DNA at 60 | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it

DNA has become a sacred entity -- the modern equivalent of the Christian soul, an individual's essence, writes Donna Dickenson.


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The Gandhian Moment - Late Night Live - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The Gandhian Moment - Late Night Live - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
Mahatma Gandhi’s ideas have motivated such famous figures as Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, and the Dalai Lama.
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Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford — 90 Local faith communities and the promotion of resilience in humanitarian situations: a scoping study

Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford — 90 Local faith communities and the promotion of resilience in humanitarian situations: a scoping study | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
Local Faith Communities (LFCs) are groupings of religious actors bonded through shared allegiance to institutions, beliefs, history or identity. They engage in a range of activities across the humanitarian spectrum.
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Rescooped by Sinaia Sinai from JAPAN, as I see it
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Men cry discrimination as women's status rises

Men cry discrimination as women's status rises | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it

Japan, it seems, is forever discriminating against someone. Women, ethnic minorities, sexual minorities, lifestyle minorities, the disabled, part-time workers — all have made claims against a state and a national psychology that define acceptability very narrowly relative to most other developed societies. Who in this country isn’t discriminated against? Heterosexual able-bodied Japanese males?

No, they too are victims, and a headline introducing a report on the subject in the weekly Aera is accorded two exclamation points: “Discrimination against men is unforgivable!!”

Almost every week, the magazine tells us, angry men demonstrate outside one or another JR train station on Tokyo’s Yamanote loop line. The numbers are not imposing — 10 participants are counted at one rally — but the placards are big and bold: “This affects all of us. Men’s rights are being violated!”

Violated how? The people to ask are members of a group called Citizens’ Association to Ban Discrimination Against Men. It was formed in 2010. How many members it has is not mentioned, but to get an idea of how widely their complaint resonates, Aera polled at random 600 people nationwide — 400 men, 200 women — asking them if they feel there is such a problem. Among men, 55.8 percent say there is or at least might be. The corresponding figure for women is 32.5 percent.

Founder and chairman of the Association is Yuji Yoshida, a 30-year-old company employee. “What keeps me going,” he says, “is anger.” It started, for him, in 2005 with the introduction on some train lines of women-only cars, intended to protect women from gropers. Protection is an entitlement hard to quarrel with, but Yoshida sees collateral issues. Why should women be favored over, for example, elderly men? Why should women get to commute in relatively uncrowded comfort while men must endure jam-packed conditions in the rest of the train?

Trivial in itself, the train issue is a symbol of bigger things, insists Nobuyuki Kanematsu, whose group Discrimination Network has concerns similar to Yoshida’s. First, a general principle is at stake: Article 14 of the Constitution guarantees equal rights for all. Second, discrimination against men, Kanematsu argues, is wider than many people suppose. Hiring and promotion practices are commonly assumed to be skewed against women. That is not always true. In 2010, he says, among 13,981 people applying for clerical-level court jobs, 26 percent of men and 19 percent of women passed the written exam — but interview pass rates were 26 percent for men and 48 percent for women. “Clearly,” he says, “the government gives preferential treatment to women and discriminates against men.”

That will surprise most women, and not a few men. When the World Economic Forum’s 2012 Global Gender Gap Report placed Japan a dismal 101st among 135 countries, discrimination against men was not the issue. Among the report’s damning figures: 62 percent of working women quit their jobs after the birth of their first child; female university researchers account for a paltry 13.8 percent of the total; in the Diet, female lawmakers comprise 18.6 percent of the Upper House and 7.9 percent of the Lower; meanwhile, 70.2 percent of the nation’s part-time workers are women, receiving less pay and fewer benefits than full-timers, often for the same work. Even women working full-time earn on average 30.7 percent less than men, the second lowest (after South Korea) among the major economies.

So when men, the supposed discriminators and beneficiaries, themselves cry discrimination, women might be excused for feeling insult is being added to injury. Still, Aera allows, the men do have a point. Women’s status is rising and men’s is falling. A single statistic is sharply indicative: Nationwide in 1997 there were 2.21 million executive-class employees; by 2010 there were 1.59 million. Most of those laid off under the “restructuring” pressures of a flat economy were men — who else, given male dominance of the executive ranks? It’s been a dispiriting two decades for men. Women may be rising more slowly here than in other countries, but their upward direction is clear — as clear as male decline. Maybe men should be forgiven a little sullenness.

Or maybe it’s time men said to women, “Your turn. You run the show!” Why not? Few looking at history or current affairs would congratulate men on a brilliant stewardship. Quite possibly women would do better.

But do women want that? Japanese women, by and large, do not, if a 2010 survey by the continuing-education firm U-Can means anything. It shows 53.9 percent among the 568 single women randomly polled would prefer, given a choice, to be full-time housewives.

Full-time housewives? Not corporate executives, political leaders, technological innovators?

The women’s magazine Josei Jishin takes up the subject with sociologist Masahiro Yamada, two of whose crisp coinages, “parasite singles” and konkatsu, have helped define our times. (Parasite singles are grown children living with and being partly supported by their parents; konkatsu, related to a similar word for job-hunting, means “spouse-hunting.”) “It seems to me more female college students lately are hoping to end up as housewives,” says Yamada. “It’s a way to escape from tough working conditions. What with the widening gap between rich and poor, there aren’t so many unmarried high-income men around anymore, so ideal and reality don’t often coincide.”

But they sometimes do. Josei Jishin introduces a certain Ms. Kawamura, age 46, who 16 years ago decided she would marry a doctor or no one. She took cooking lessons, frequented matchmaking parties popular with doctors, and found what she was looking for. “There was a guy I liked better, but he was poor, and I had an iron will. I dumped him.”

Everything worked to perfection. The couple’s young son is at school most of the day, and mom is what she always wanted to be — a happy member of the propertied leisure class. Just one worry troubles her: “Once the boy is grown and it’s just the two of us, whatever will my husband and I talk about?”


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Diversity is amazing

Diversity is amazing | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
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Donkey assisted therapy shines at Romanian orphanage | The Donkey Sanctuary

Donkey assisted therapy shines at Romanian orphanage | The Donkey Sanctuary | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
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Built on Brotherhood, Club Lives Up to Name

Built on Brotherhood, Club Lives Up to Name | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
A.S.F. Fratia Bucharest, a soccer team in the Romanian fifth division, is the only club in its league run on the principles of equality and nondiscrimination.
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MB Telecom plans EUR 5 million expansion in Switzerland - Business Review

MB Telecom plans EUR 5 million expansion in Switzerland - Business Review | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
MB Telecom, a Romanian producer of hi-tech security equipment, is looking to expand its production capacity in Switzerland, as the company is venturing onto international markets to sell sophisticated technology.
Sinaia Sinai's insight:

Mircea Tudor. Inventor.

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The Philosophers' Mail

Western philosophy has failed @MirandaKerr, argues @PhilosopherMail http://t.co/a39z8AzA5d
Sinaia Sinai's insight:

Philosophy as a living resource is Eastern :]

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Inequality Is The Number One Challenge Of The 21st Century

Inequality Is The Number One Challenge Of The 21st Century | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
S&D Group in the European Parliament leader Hannes Swoboda explains why inequality is the most crucial challenge in the 21st century.
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The Spectator's Notes: In the radical 1970s, logic was on the side of the Paedophile Information Exchange

The Spectator's Notes: In the radical 1970s, logic was on the side of the Paedophile Information Exchange | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
People seem bewildered that the National Council for Civil Liberties in the late 1970s gave house-room to the Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE). It is certainly embarrassing for Harriet Harman and…
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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World - A Sheep No More

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World - A Sheep No More | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and info graphics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection...
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Nicolae Gheorghe

Nicolae Gheorghe | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
“NOMAD” was a good word for Nicolae Gheorghe. He was always on the move, with his worldly goods strapped to his back: a laptop, bundles of e-mails, a...
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A rare human being

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Global Wealth Inequality - What you never knew you never knew

The extreme truth about how wealth is divided globally. Inspired by the amazing "Wealth Inequality in America" video. Production Company: Grain Media www.gra...
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What Americans Keep Ignoring About Finland's School Success

What Americans Keep Ignoring About Finland's School Success | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
The Scandinavian country is an education superpower because it values equality more than excellence.
Sinaia Sinai's insight:

Equity, more than excellence.
Cooperation, not competition.

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Why Inequality Is The Root Of The Crisis

Why Inequality Is The Root Of The Crisis | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
A very interesting video on the link between inequality and the origin of the financial crisis on The Real News. This is in line with recent research in Europe.
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Diversity is amazing

Diversity is amazing | Diversity&Attitude | Scoop.it
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