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Information pertaining to the field of Distance Learning.
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Videoconferencing - Guide to Teaching through Videoconferencing


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Donna Farren's insight:

Helpful resource for videoconferencing teachers

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8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions

8 Strategies To Help Students Ask Great Questions | Distance Learning | Scoop.it

"Questions can be extraordinary learning tools.

A good question can open minds, shift paradigms, and force the uncomfortable but transformational cognitive dissonance that can help create thinkers. In education, we tend to value a student’s ability to answer our questions. But what might be more important is their ability to ask their own great questions–and more critically, their willingness to do so."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 15, 11:05 PM

How do you teach your learners to ask good questions? This post shares many resources to help you learn new skills that will assist you in teaching others.

The post begins with a visual, the Teach Thought Learning Taxonomy, which is a template for critical thinking that looks at cognition across six categories. This is described in depth.

Additional tools shared include:

* Socratic Discussion which includes a video from Tch (the Teaching Channel)

* Paideia Seminar - "an integrated literacy event built around formal whole class dialogue. The purpose for doing Paideia Seminar is to support students’ ability to think conceptually and communicate collaboratively." There is also a video.

* The Question Game (which was shared previously on this Scoop.it)

* Bloom's Taxonomy

* Question Formation Technique - See the visual at the top, or check out their website at The Right Question Institute. If this is of interest to you they are presenting a workshop in Boston in July. Information on this is available at their website.

* Universal Question Stems and Basic Question Stem Examples

This is actually part 2 of a two part post. The first post is A Guide to Questioning in the Classroom.

Mike Clare's curator insight, April 16, 5:16 PM

Great starting point.  

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, April 17, 7:31 AM

SOME TIMES KNOWING THE RIGHT QUESTION TO ASK WILL GET THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR THE PROBLEM YOU ARE TRYING TO SOLVE!!  IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT TO ASK YOU MAY NOT GET THE RIGHT ANSWER FOR YEARS BUT THE ANSWER TO THE QUESTION THAT WAS ASKED!?!

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What Content Curation, Chunking Information and Micro-learning have in common? - eLearning Industry

What Content Curation, Chunking Information and Micro-learning have in common? - eLearning Industry | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
What Content Curation, Chunking Information and Micro-learning have in common? Content Curation, Chunking Information and Micro-learning
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Rescooped by Donna Farren from Geography Education
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Who Owns Antarctica?


Via Seth Dixon
Donna Farren's insight:

This is fascinating!

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Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 3:48 PM

With Antarctica being the coldest, driest, and most isolated continent on earth, it is surprising that 51 different countries own pieces of land on it. As of now, the lands there can only be used strictly for scientific research, but I presume that treaty will not be in effect forever. Hidden resources yet to be discovered and future technology and is bound to give us some reason to permanently settle in this barren land someday. Discovering oil or minerals would be a good bet, as it was a leading factor in causing Dubai to form in the Arabian Desert, or the city of Perth in Western Australia. A healthy fishing industry could even help support future economies there. While weather has always been an important factor in human colonization, it does not make a place totally inhospitable. If economies can form in places like Barrow, Alaska and Longyearbyen, Norway, I don't see future  settlements in Antarctica as an impossibility.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 5:20 PM

In reality, no one own Antarctica for now. However, it is governed under the Antarctica treaty of 1959.  There are a few reasons why no one has been claimed Antarctica, one being that is has extremely cold temperatures that drop to -122 °F. The continent also has a vast amount of thick ice that is 3 miles deep and covers its surface. In addition, it would be very costly to explore these regions and difficult to build infrastructure and transport food due to the cold temperatures and frozen seas. The Antarctica treaty of 1959 is an international agreement which states that no one cannot own the Antarctica. However, some countries have claimed some part of Antarctica. These designated areas are only to be used for scientific research purposes. Also, since an international agreement has been putted in place, Antarctica cannot be used for military purposes. The agreement also stresses freedom of scientific investigation but prohibits nuclear testing and waste disposal in Antarctica. This research has helped scientists discover new truths about global problems, climate change, and geology. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:16 PM

It will be interesting to see what happens to Antartica as the climate shifts and continues to get warmer.  What is under the frozen tundra?  Will it be something of a natural resource or mineral?  I think this is when the fight will get real about the slice of pie and how much each has.  

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Free download - An Educator's Guide to the 4 C's


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Jeroen Rougoor's curator insight, April 20, 7:16 AM

#21stCenturySkills

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Spending Up, But Marketers Still Have Big Digital Blind Spots

Spending Up, But Marketers Still Have Big Digital Blind Spots | Distance Learning | Scoop.it

A new report from Forrester reveals that — finally — marketers are treating digital marketing as part of their overall strategy, with 50% of the executives it surveyed planning to increase digital spending this year. And those expenditures are now equal to spending on traditional marketing.

But the survey also reveals that while most marketers are talking a good game — with 80% agreeing that their company has the skills required to be successful in digital marketing — their confidence falls apart when they need to get specific, such as their ability to recruit digital talent, collaborating across functional areas, or even aligning to-do lists across the organization....


Via Jeff Domansky
Donna Farren's insight:

So true!  When will they learn that tv style commercials and banner ads taken from magazine ideas are just not productive in the digital world!  Have you EVER really watched an ad before a YouTube video?  I have NOT watched a video I was going to if there is no way to skip the ad.  Why do they think DVR's are so popular - its not just the on-demand its skipping the commercials!

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 10, 3:19 PM

Moving into digital but some marketers remain stuck in old thinking according to Forrester.

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The Perfect Deadly Storm: Corporate Silence

The Perfect Deadly Storm: Corporate Silence | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
The Lufthansa plane crash serves as a reminder: Leaders must encourage openness in their organizations.
Donna Farren's insight:

"Cultures of silence are commonly caused by three conditions:

Leadership belief that they have the answers and their opinions matter most.Futility, which employees experience when they conclude their voice has no merit.Leadership behaviors perceived by employees as egregious or abusive, such as talking credit for one’s ideas or public ridicule."
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Rescooped by Donna Farren from Educación a Distancia (EaD)
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Excellent Worksheets on Bloom's Digital Taxonomy

Excellent Worksheets on Bloom's Digital Taxonomy | Distance Learning | Scoop.it

April 10, 2015In yesterday's post we shared with you a resourceful document explaining the concept of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy and how teachers can incorporate it in their instructional strategies....


Via L. García Aretio
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Rescooped by Donna Farren from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
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Convert PDFs to Google Docs

Convert PDFs to Google Docs | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
This is a guest post post from Brenda Doucette (@doucetteb) of EdTechTeacher - an advertiser on this site. Recently, we discovered a feature of Google Drive that has changed how we prepare and access materials and resources for our students. As we…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Donna Farren's insight:

This is a GREAT tip and one I have been search for a long time!  Thanks!

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Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, March 30, 11:45 AM

Keep everything at the tip of your digital fingers.

Daniel Morgenstern's curator insight, March 30, 3:47 PM

very simple

Tony Guzman's curator insight, March 31, 9:16 AM

The OCR feature in Google Drive now lets you make copies of PDF files that can be edited and annotated. Anyone use this yet?

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Austin Community College's promising experiment with personalized remedial mathematics @insidehighered

Austin Community College's promising experiment with personalized remedial mathematics @insidehighered | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Donna Farren's insight:

What a great idea of making use of existing community space and educational technology!  We have similar learning recovery programs on a much smaller scale.

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Rescooped by Donna Farren from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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Keeping Pace with Online Learning


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, March 13, 12:24 AM

Will your teaching skills keep pace with this decade (let alone the next one). Think about how you can build the skills needed to be a teacher in the 21st century. 


About Us: The University of Wisconsin-Stout E-Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate Program specializes in highly personalized, discussion-based training in how to teach online. 

Dennis Danielson's curator insight, May 6, 7:42 PM

The Pace is accelerating.

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Lesson Plan Ideas with Common Core Correlations - ProCon.org

Lesson Plan Ideas with Common Core Correlations - ProCon.org | Distance Learning | Scoop.it

"We offer these lesson plan ideas to help teachers cover important skills in English/Language Arts and Social Studies. Each SKILLS-BASED IDEA and CONTENT-BASED IDEA suggests specific ProCon.org topics and resources that are particularly well-matched to the lesson and designed to help you meet multiple curriculum goals."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 7, 7:44 AM

Beth Dichter's insight:

ProCon is one of my favorite websites. The mission of the site is to promote 'critical thinking, education, and informed citizenship by presenting controversial issues in a straightforward, nonpartisian, primarily pro-con format." There are 52 controversial topics that are available, and they have just released 20 lesson plans. Seventeen of the lesson plans are skill- based and three are content-based. The lesson plans are geared to learners in grades 5 - 12. Below is a list of two skill-based lessons and two content-based lesson, along with the grade levels.

Skill-Based (material quoted from site):

* Critical Thinking Quotes - Engage students in a metacognition exercise about critical thinking and also practice research and informational writing skills using ProCon.org's collection of critical thinking quotes. Grades 9 -12.

* Main Ideas of Visual References - Use charts and graphs on ProCon.org to engage students in a visual literacy exercise. Grades 6 - 8.

Content-Based

* Exploring Controversial Issues in Literature - To introduce a novel, use ProCon.org to help students build background knowledge and examine the novel’s controversial issue(s). Grades 5 - 10.

* Drug Ads Over Time: Analyzing Historical Images - Use ProCon.org's Gallery of Drug Ads to give students an opportunity to practice ad analysis and recognize how methods and messages have changed over time. Grades 5 - 10.

To access the 52 issues that have detailed information and provide references (and links) to the materials used click on the Home page and you will find topics in Education, Elections & Presidents, Health & Medicine, Media & Entertainment, Money & Business, Politics, Religion, Science & Technology, Sex & Gender, Sports, and World/International.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, March 8, 12:44 PM

Thx Beth Dichter!

Great skills building via content-based articles that center on hot topics in the news related to science concepts (and others).

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Embedded Videos in PowerPoint Aren’t Playing?

Embedded Videos in PowerPoint Aren’t Playing? | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
BrightCarbon provide a quick and easy solution to the issue of videos not running in PowerPoint.

Via Baiba Svenca
Donna Farren's insight:

This is a fantastic and handy tool if you are ever sharing power points with embedded video!  Thanks to those who made it and shared it!

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Baiba Svenca's curator insight, May 19, 2:05 PM

The article gives some useful tips how to deal with this rather common issue in PPT presentations.

John Jung's curator insight, May 22, 11:39 PM

great idea of sending test file with diff formats of embedded videos to make sure the host computer can run them!

Rescooped by Donna Farren from Interactive Teaching and Learning
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Developing digital literacies | Jisc

Developing digital literacies | Jisc | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Provides ideas and resources to inspire the strategic development of digital literacies - those capabilities which support living, learning and working in a digital society

Via Anne Whaits
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Live and Lucrative? Why Video Streaming Supremacy Matters

Live and Lucrative? Why Video Streaming Supremacy Matters | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Meerkat and Periscope are the latest in socially connected apps that let users broadcast live video from their smartphones. But will they last?
Donna Farren's insight:

This is really interesting - I immediately went to download both apps and they are not available on Android - so limited availability.  But video is where things are at.  Yahoo is playing a live concert every night.  You can see most sports live streamed on devices from apps.  I even heard the Major League Baseball Commissioner say yesterday in an interview that by the end of the summer they want people to be able to watch games on the device of their choosing.  Video is a "lean forward experience" and apps like these are going to make an entry at some point.

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Rescooped by Donna Farren from Digital Delights for Learners
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9 Free Video Conferencing Web Apps — No Registration Required

9 Free Video Conferencing Web Apps — No Registration Required | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
There's a problem with traditional video conferencing clients. Though they are in abundance, they're only remotely useful if all parties are collectively using the same client. Popular services such as VoxOX, ooVoo, IMO and, of course, Skype and Google Hangouts all have this problem, thus putting a damper on quick collaboration. One "solution" to this is…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Jarrod Johnson's curator insight, April 14, 6:50 PM

Good collaborative  tools for small groups

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#Justiceforpete, Biddy Martin and Amherst Humor | InsideHigherEd.com

#Justiceforpete, Biddy Martin and Amherst Humor | InsideHigherEd.com | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Donna Farren's insight:

How ironic to find this today after my earlier share - I give Biddy a lot of credit!

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Political pressure builds for a new accreditation and aid pathway for upstart providers | InsideHigherEd.com

Political pressure builds for a new accreditation and aid pathway for upstart providers | InsideHigherEd.com | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
Donna Farren's insight:

It is funny to me that education is the slowest to move in changing education.  The rest of the business and industry realizes there are all these new ways to learn and gather knowledge - but the educational organizations are the most resistant to it.  I read the other day that the term elearning was coined in 1993.  Yet in 2015 there is no fully online high school in New York...  You would think the people who know the most about education would want to lead the changes but instead they are the ones saying it should be done the same ways it has always been done.  The rest of the world has changed but we will still follow the industrial model...

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The Who, What, Why, and When of E-mail Communication in Schools

The Who, What, Why, and When of E-mail Communication in Schools | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
By Jasmine Kullar E-mailing is a great tool in our schools. We have come a long way from when we had to make several trips to the mailroom throughout the day to check our mailboxes for memos from the principal. Today, e-mails are used to effectively and efficiently communicate with others. However, e-mails can also be used in a way that creates more work for school employees. Think of a time in your school when someone accidentally hit the “reply all” button when the e-mail was meant for just one person. Think of a time when someone accidentally forwarded an e-mail that was meant for a colleague to a parent. These workplace “oops” can have detrimental effects because they can influence the trust and culture in the school. Before getting into the who, what, why, and when of e-mail communication, the most important advice I can give is to write e-mails as if your principal or superintendent is reading them. This way, even if an e-mail is accidentally sent to the wrong recipient, the effect will not be as destructive. Whom is the e-mail for? Having an understanding of to whom you are writing the e-mail is probably the most important step. Are you writing to a parent? Student? Teacher? Administrator? Colleague? Central Office? Business Partner? Parent leaders? Are you writing to just one person or a group of people? Knowing your audience is important, but knowing the difference between the audiences is even more important. For example, an e-mail to a colleague could have a very different tone than an e-mail to a parent. However, regardless of the tone, always apply the “my boss is reading this e-mail” principle. In other words, regardless of whom the audience is, the what of the e-mail should always be professional. What should be in the e-mail? Reread every e-mail before you send it out. What exactly are you trying to say and is your e-mail capturing that? Reread the e-mail for tone. Is the tone condescending? If you’re not sure, ask another colleague to read it and get their opinion. Always ensure the e-mail is emotion free. When you get those e-mails that spark an emotion, wait a little bit before responding. The best way to keep the e-mail free of emotion is to stick to the facts and respond only to the question being asked. If there is no question, think about what it is that you are responding to. Sometimes it’s okay to just respond back with “Thank you for your e-mail.” Less is better! I recommend going by the “three lines or less” rule. The more you put in e-mail, the more you may set yourself up for difficulty when trying to diffuse situations. Why e-mail? If e-mails should be three lines or less, what happens if the message cannot be written in three lines or less? At that point, you pick up the phone and call or request a face-to-face meeting. When sending out an e-mail, ask yourself why this particular e-mail is being sent out. In other words, make sure to consider whether or not the message would be better delivered using another method. For example, a message to a parent about a student who is struggling in a particular area is probably best received if you talk to the parent over the phone or in person. A message about a student who has not turned in an assignment, on the other hand, can be sent in a simple e-mail that asks the parent to ensure the student brings in the assignment. Always remember to evaluate why you are sending the e-mail. Keep in mind that an e-mail is meant to be efficient and effective—if an e-mail is not the most efficient or effective way to relay a message, don’t use e-mail as your communication method. When should you e-mail? Nobody wants her phone dinging at 3:00 a.m. with e-mails. Unless it is an absolute emergency (at which point you should probably call), refrain from sending out e-mails at odd hours throughout the night. Keeping a balance in life is important. As stressful and time consuming as our work can be, try to sleep at night and stay off e-mail! In conclusion . . . Here are some quick tips for e-mail communication: Always write as if your supervisor is reading your e-mail. Keep e-mails free of emotion and to the point. Keep e-mails to three lines or less. Know when it’s more appropriate to pick up the phone or have a face-to-face conversation. E-mail during work hours, if possible—or at least before 10:00 p.m. Jasmine Kullar is a principal in Fulton County Schools, Ga., with 15 years of experience.
Donna Farren's insight:

While I don't agree with every point - but I use email in a different environment - I do think people need to be reminded that everything you write on an email at work should be considered a "postcard."  It is so easy to send flaming emails when you don't see the person or to forget that IT is saving all emails.  As one of my friends who sent an "oops" email probably 20 years ago and I always say "Email is not a toy!"  Use it carefully.  This article is a good reminder.

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USDLA: Archived Webinars

USDLA: Archived Webinars | Distance Learning | Scoop.it

Just a few of many:

 

Connect, Collaborate, Serve, Learn: A Virtual Pathway to Educational Success


Adapting to Competency-Based Learning: An Industry Perspective


An Instructional Designer Supported Approach to Accelerated Online Course Development


Adding Game Elements to Online Courses: It’s Not That Hard!


First Course Success: Using Data to Predict Program Success


Where Competency Based Education is Leading Us: Interviews from the field


Too young for social media? We think not!




Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, March 26, 6:34 PM

Lots to learn from leaders in the field of distance education!

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Coaching Strategies to Enhance Online Discussions

Coaching Strategies to Enhance Online Discussions | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
I am not an athlete. I lack coordination and have some physical limitations. My husband, on the other hand, is an excellent skier. He isn’t a teacher but he believed I could learn to ski, convinced me to try, and partnered with me in the learning process, like the best teachers do. Learning to ski taught me 10 coaching strategies bridging four areas: establishing a safe space to learn, sharing responsibility, providing feedback, and empowering the learner. I apply these strategies to facilitating online discussions, but they relate to a range of learning contexts.
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200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | Distance Learning | Scoop.it

"Where have immigrants to the U.S. come from? Natalia Bronshtein, a professor and consultant who runs the blog Insightful Interaction, created this fascinating visualization of the number of immigrants to the U.S. since 1829 by country of origin.  The graph hints at tragic events in world history. The first influx of Irish occurred during the potato famine in 1845, while the massive influx of Russians in the first decade of the 20th Century was driven by anti-Semitic violence of the Russian pogroms (riots). Meanwhile in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, army conscription and the forced assimilation of minority groups drove people to the U.S. in the early 1900s.  Since WWII, Central and South America and Asia have replaced Europe as the largest source of immigrants to the U.S. Immigration shrunk to almost nothing as restrictions tightened during WWII, and then gradually expanded to reach its largest extent ever in the first decade of the 21st Century."


Tags: migration, historical, USA, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
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Olivier Tabary's curator insight, March 25, 4:20 PM

Quite impressive new graphic approach to cope with immigration flows in the USA

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, April 8, 7:34 PM

These beautiful waves of color tell the amazing immigration history of the United States. The influxes of people tell some tragic stories of world history and about refugees coming into the states. I am also including the interactive version here:

http://insightfulinteraction.com/immigration200years.html

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Current theme! 200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | @scoopit via @ProfessorDixon http://sco.lt/...

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The Bandwidth Gap: The States Where School Internet Is Slowest

Nearly every school in America has some form of Internet connectivity—but that alone doesn't mean all kids have equal access to the web.
Donna Farren's insight:

This is a issue to consider when assigning online learning or blended learning assignments to students.  It is also an issue for schools that are 1:1 but do not allow the students to take the device home.  We do not want to be creating learning for the haves and have nots.  Try and make online activities due in a few days to give all students access to the technology and the internet.

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Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Distance Learning | Scoop.it
The Blended and Online Assessment Taxonomy Infographic presents types of activities and grading and feedback criteria to help you plan better assessments.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, March 19, 5:29 PM

Genial a utilização da taxonomia de Bloom nesse infografico das possiveis atividades em formato "blended"(mix presencial e on line)

Dr. Melissa A. Bordogna's curator insight, March 26, 1:59 AM

At a glance, I thought this a helpful infographic.  It also made me think of the types of feedback I give my students.  In addtion to using a rubric (marking criteria), I tend to provide a fair bit of written feedback.  

How about you...Which types of feedback have you found to be very effective in terms of student learning (as oppose to time-saving for us)?

Karen Ellis's curator insight, April 1, 6:57 PM

Designing and planning assesment in online learning is very important.  This infographic reminds us of the importance of making the task student centric and that  ongoing feedback is critical.