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Distance Ed Archive
Topics related to distance eLearning in academia and other organizations
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MOOC Verses DOCC | Open Research & Learning

MOOC Verses DOCC | Open Research & Learning | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

'It was only a matter of time before massive open online courses (MOOC) were challenged to see online learning in a new light. Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) has a different approach to how students should learn through online education and the role of the instructor. Where MOOCs facilitated the traditional sense of teaching, having one instructor who values the topic they teach. DOCC has expanded this idea to include many instructors, experts, and guest lecturers from various regions to teach the students.

 

The belief for DOCC is that it takes more than one instructor on a subject for students to truly learn a topic. DOCC focuses on interaction between students, teachers, and peers to expand on their topic, while learning from one another is the vital component. Anne Balsamo, dean of the School of Media Studies at The New School and co-facilitator of the DOCC, said “who you learn with is as important as what you learn. Learning is a relationship, not just something that can be measured by outcomes or formal metrics.”" - From /source - http://proctorfree.com/mooc-verses-dooc

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Quip Is A Beautiful New Mobile-First Word Processor From Ex-Facebook CTO Bret Taylor | TechCrunch

Quip Is A Beautiful New Mobile-First Word Processor From Ex-Facebook CTO Bret Taylor | TechCrunch | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"30 years later and our word processing software hasn't changed, not even to adapt to mobile. That changes tonight with the launch of Quip, a free new word processing app from former Facebook CTO Bret Taylor's new startup" TechCrunch.

 

From Quip.com:

... Quip works on the desktop (PC and Mac), iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and Android. Wherever you are, whatever device you are using, you can use Quip.
... With Quip, everyone can edit the same version of the document at the same time. There's just one document and one thread that shows the entire history of the document through diffs, not a bunch of attachments with indecipherable titles like “ClientProposal-Kevin-Version3.doc.”
... Quip combines documents and messages into a single chat-like “thread” of updates. You can discuss the document you are editing directly in the thread without having to shuffle back and forth from email to talk about it, and all messages show up in real-time. Your Quip home screen has an inbox, enabling you to easily see the documents that have been shared with you, as well as new edits and messages.
... Diffs are simple visual representations of edits to a document. Diffs get added to the thread every time an edit is made, showing what's changed, who made the change, and when they made it. When someone else edits a document, diffs make it easy to stay up-to-date without re-reading the whole document.
... All the features in Quip work perfectly offline on your phone or tablet. Whether you're on an airplane or in a no-service zone, you can create new documents or edit existing ones, and even send messages. Whenever you have internet connection again, your changes will sync automatically. Even if multiple people are simultaneously editing a document offline, the changes will merge seamlessly.
... Shared folders enable you to easily share documents with a group. Create a folder for your family's recipes or to organize a project for your team. Everyone in the shared folder can add documents or contribute to the documents already in the folder. You can also create subfolders within a shared folder, which can be restricted to a smaller group.
... Use @mentions to reference a person or a document. You can use @mentions in both documents and messages to create a dynamic link to any of your Quip documents or reference any of your contacts. Mentioning a person makes it easy to identify someone within a document, such as when assigning a task. The same @ symbol is used to insert photos and tables.
... Working together is easier when you know whether someone is online. You can see someone's presence in multiple places on Quip — even what folder or document they're in. Your Contacts list also shows you who's online, what device they're using, and what they're working on, as well as when your offline contacts were last online.
... Read receipts appear at the bottom of each document thread. They're an easy way to see who's read your edits or the messages you've sent. You can see who's read the most recent updates, and when everyone is up-to-date, the text will change to “Read by everyone”.
... One of the formatted list options is a checklist, which turns your document from a static piece of paper into an interactive task list. Manage your grocery list with a roommate, your personal to-do's, or your team task list.
... When you're using Quip in a browser, chat tabs enable you to easily view and respond to messages regardless of what document you're working on. When a new message is sent in one of your documents or threads, a chat tab will appear in the bottom right corner of the screen. You can respond inside the chat tab or click through to the document itself.

> Quip site: https://quip.com/" from source: http://techcrunch.com/

#Quip #editor #CloudComputing #offline #offline-editing #multi-platform #iOS #browsers #Android #smartphone #tablet #laptop #wordprocessor #editor #education #training #groupware #collaboration #chat #versioning #version-control

ghbrett's insight:

The descriptions of Quip's features above pretty much say it all. At first I thought this was built initially for the Mac/iOS platform, but the About page info above made it clear that it functions on other platforms as well. Also, you can use the application offline. Plus it conforms the user interface so that it is appropriate for the device being used whether smart phone, tablet, or computer browser. From the TechCrunch article there are indications that this is just the first of more applications from this group. I will be paying attention to their products, I hope you will too.

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Versal

Versal | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Are you inspired to create amazing interactive courses, but don’t know how to code?

 

Versal is a simple (open) publishing platform with everything you need. Add text, videos, images, quizzes and interactive learning gadgets and bring your expertise to life.

 

We’re currently in beta, so you may encounter an occasional hiccup. More features are on the way. Have an idea? We'd love to hear it.

 

... Beyond video. Beyond slide decks. Versal brings interactivity to online learning through customizable exercises called “gadgets.”

 

Drag and drop gadgets – simulations, charts and so much more - right into your course, no coding required." from source: https://versal.com/

 

#edtech #course-authoring #authoring #education #training #ISD  #OER

#Open

 

Twitter: @Versal - https://twitter.com/versal

Foundation: https://versal.org/

Blog: http://blog.versal.com/

 

ghbrett's insight:

Here is a new startup, Versal. It is an Online Learning authoring tool with modules that allow an author, teacher, trainer, or anyone to build "courses". Currently it an open platform.  I'm sure that if what they suggest is true, then it could be a model for a MOOC or online education platform. It was just announced on Google+ today with it's own circle and moderated communnity. The circle conversation can be found at: http://bit.ly/13yfk9y

 

I will be curious to hear how this application will scale up. Also, how it is currently managed and will this lead to another freemium web application that gets you hooked and then charges as your repertoire grows. Or when your audience expands beyond a few tens of participant to a few thousands. We'll see.

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Intro to Nemetics - The Infintely Dynamic Play

"The purpose of using Nemes and Nemetics is coming to grips with ‘emergences’, which I believe is well within the reach of almost everyone on the earth. It helps us better understand events in our lives to take actions that change our future to a more ‘desirable’ one.

 

Let us start by understanding NEME. It is an acronym that stands for:

>> N = Notice

>> E = Engage

>> M = Mull

>> E = Exchange"

 

from source: - http://rmcpl.wordpress.com/

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ghbrett's curator insight, July 8, 2013 8:14 AM

The author goes on to describe the processes and provides some examples as well as a SWF video. It is a long post, but take the time to read it all.

 

As I interpret the notion of #NEMETICS I see it related to a couple things as identifying processes for activities listed near the end of the article. Also, there are mentions of iteration and growth. I reminds me of Jeff Conklin's work ( http://www.cognexus.org/cognexus_institute.htm ) on Dialog Mapping using Compendium ( http://projects.kmi.open.ac.uk/compendium/ ) based on Issue Based Information Systems ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Issue-Based_Information_System ).

 

My visual would be a 2x2 matrix with N, E, M, E in each of the four squares. There would be a spiral that begins in the lower left of N and then move through the other three squares. Instead of just continuing as one line, there could be multiple branches that continue (iterate) or due to the Exchange would point to other 2x2 matrices of a similar nature.

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BigBluebutton - open source web conferencing with extended functions

BigBluebutton - open source web conferencing with extended functions | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"BigBlueButton is an open source web conferencing system built on over fourteen open source components to create an integrated solution that runs on Mac, Unix, and PC computers. In the true sense of open source, we invite you to try out and participate in our project.


Vision: Our vision is that starting a web conference should be as easy as clicking a single metaphorical big blue button. As an open source project, we believe it should be easy for others to embrace and extend education. And while web conferencing means many things to many people — our focus is to make the best web conferencing system for distance education.


What’s new in this release (Beta 08.1):
1) Simplified interface – BigBlueButton now has a consolidated Users window for easier session management and a more consistent user interface (including updated skin and icons) to help new users get started quickly.

 

2) Layout Manager – BigBlueButton now enables users to choose from a number of preset layouts to quickly adapt to different modes of learning.

 

3) Recording of whiteboard and webcams – BigBlueButton now records for playback all the activity in the presentation window (whiteboard, mouse movements, and pan/zoom) and all webcams shared during a session.

 

4) Text tool for whiteboard – Presenters can now annotate their slides with text.

 

5) New APIs – The BigBlueButton API now includes the ability to dynamically configure each client on a per-user bases, thus enabling developers to configure the skin, layout, modules, etc. for each user. There is also a JavaScript interface to control the client.

 

6) Accessibility – BigBlueButton now supports screen readers JAWS (version 11+) and NVDA. A list of keyboard shortcuts have been added to make it easier to navigate through the interface using the keyboard.

 

7) LTI Support – BigBlueButton is IMS Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI) 1.0 compliant. This means any LTI consumer can integrate with BigBlueButton without requiring custom plug-ins.

 

8) Mozilla Persona – The API demos now include examples of how to sign into a BigBlueButton session using Mozilla Persona.
Support for LibreOffice 4.0 – BigBlueButton now uses LibreOffice 4.0 for conversion of of 9) MS Office documents (upload of PDF is still recommend to provide best results)." from source: http://www.bigbluebutton.org/

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ghbrett's curator insight, July 1, 2013 12:11 PM

This sounds like an exciting alternative educational, training, and groupware tool. I will be participating in a group test later next week and will make a further comment then.

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"Open Access" By Peter Suber

"Open Access" By Peter Suber | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Open Access - By Peter Suber 

 

NOW AVAILABLE IN MULTIPLE OPEN ACCESS FORMATS

 

... The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work “open access”: digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue.

 

In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn’t, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber’s influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers."

-- from source: https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/open-access

ghbrett's insight:

Peter Suber has been a driving force in the rapidly growing area(s) of Open Access. Rather than cite this or that have a look at his info at Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Suber  Here is a wonderful resource for anyone who uses Internet resources. Get a copy for a eBook-Reader, a computer, or your Boss, but don't forget yourself. Then Read it and then keep as a handy reference resource.

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KPCB Internet Trends 2013

The latest edition of the annual Internet Trends report finds continued robust online growth. There are now 2.4 billion Internet users around the world, and the
ghbrett's insight:

"The latest edition of the annual Internet Trends report finds continued robust online growth. There are now 2.4 billion Internet users around the world, and the total continues to grow apace. Mobile usage is expanding rapidly, while the mobile advertising opportunity remains largely untapped. The report reviews the shifting online landscape, which has become more social and content rich, with expanded use of photos, video and audio. Looking ahead, the report finds early signs of growth for wearable computing devices, like glasses, connected wrist bands and watches - and the emergence of connected cars, drones and other new platforms." Note 117 slides - from source: http://www.slideshare.net/

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Digital Humanism — Technology + Liberal Arts

Digital Humanism — Technology + Liberal Arts | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Digital Humanism


. . . Technology has bequeathed to the liberal arts a new, more expansive life. But the liberal arts also have lessons to bequeath, and we ignore them at our peril.

 

. . . We are in the midst of a great sea change. Humanists are swimming, and occasionally sinking, in an embarrassment of informational riches. The hierarchies that historically made the liberal arts possible are crumbling. Like it or not, technology is the driving force in a new, digital humanism

 

. . . If we take from the liberal arts one guideline on how to inhabit an increasingly non-analog world, it should be this digital humanities mission statement: 'to remain aware of the uncertain, varied, unruly terrain of human existence even as that existence gets represented in digital form.'" from source: https://medium.com/technology-liberal-arts/

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ghbrett's curator insight, May 19, 2013 2:56 PM

This blog post while focused on the Digital Humanities can be applied to many other disciplines that traditionally did not engage with computers. Well, there are always exceptions, but the use of information technology, communications, and computing were not pervasive.

 

I remember way back when the Macintosh first came out. I was supporting academic computing for the University of North Carolina System which included the contract for microcomputers. I have a Masters of Fine Arts and so when I planned a visit to one campus I called the Dean of the School of the Arts. I explained I'd like to show her this new computer that supported drawing, typography, and foreign language much better than anything else we had. A new first for the Arts. She wasn't interested. She said that the only computer she needed was between her ears, a pencil in her hand for output, and paper to draw on. Times have changed. A sub-text of this tale is that Technology continues to change for better and sometimes worse. It is important to keep an open mind. It is also important to listen to both sides of discussions about the applications and their value. At the moment I feel deja vu with Cloud Computing and the olde days of Mainframes in glass rooms. What would you do if you couldn't access all the Google apps and services for a week or a month? Some say no problem, others would suffer.

 

As the author of the blog says about a digital humanities mission statement, "to remain aware of the uncertain, varied, unruly terrain of human existence even as that existence gets represented in digital form." Keep your eyes open, look for opportunities, and watch your back. Thanks to @verbagetruck for the reminder.

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Three online class types « Lisa's (Online) Teaching Blog

"A draft of another tripartite idea, this time focused on online classes in general, across the board.

 

The McClass

Run inside an LMS, or even better by Coursera or Udacity, and/or offered by proponents of the mass-produced course (U of Phoenix, Ashford, etc), the McClass features recorded lectures, an unmoderated internal discussion (if any), and grading by graduate students, peers or staff (and soon robo-graders). All xMOOCs are in this category, but so are classes created by teams of instructional designers or course developers and “content experts”, but facilitated (I hesitate to use the word “taught”) by less experienced instructors or program coordinators. Sartorial analogy: one size fits all.

 

The sub sandwich class

It’s a six inch or a twelve — you can change the mix of ingredients inside but the options are standardized. Sub sandwich classes are offered by community colleges and universities dependent on a single Learning Management System, the inherent design of which influences (and may determine) instructor pedagogy. Even built on a whole wheat system like Canvas or an in-house product, the defaults of the LMS are easy to adopt without requiring an examination of ones own pedagogy. Hallmarks include dependence on publisher-produced materials, and an internal, traditional moderated discussion of issues, usually lacking a constructivist focus. Quality varies and is partly dependent on the freshness of the ingredients.

 

The artisanal class

Created by the instructor, the artisanal class includes only those elements that help realize the instructor’s pedagogy. The design is developed based on knowledge and experience as an active, independent teacher. The artisanal class may exist inside an LMS, but when it does the LMS is substantially customized, and often external web elements are brought in to replace built-in features (blogs, wikis, etc). Hallmarks include a foundation in free and open or home-made formats, innovative assessment techniques, and a distinct lack of top-down control. Discussion may be distributed or focused on content creation. Flaws add character and provide opportunity for community creativity. Most cMOOCs fit this model, but so do classes offered by public institutions who allow faculty substantial control over the design and deployment of their work." from source: http://lisahistory.net

ghbrett's insight:

This post offers a differentiation of online courses moving from chaos to small group interaction. As I have noted in an earlier post this week, there is growing assessment of the types of and value of MOOCs. 

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UNESCO Mobile Learning Publications | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

UNESCO Mobile Learning Publications | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Today there are over six billion mobile phone subscriptions worldwide, and for every one person who accesses the internet from a computer two do so from a mobile device. Given the ubiquity and rapidly expanding functionality of mobile technologies, UNESCO is enthusiastic about their potential to improve and facilitate learning, particularly in communities where educational opportunities are scarce. This Working Paper Series scans the globe to illuminate the ways in which mobile technologies can be used to support the United Nations Education for All Goals; respond to the challenges of particular educational contexts; supplement and enrich formal schooling; and make learning more accessible, equitable, personalized and flexible for students everywhere." from source: http://www.unesco.org/

ghbrett's insight:

This page includes four Mobile Learning Publications with numerous links to region specific content on mobile learning. Plus there are links to extensive bibliographic resources about mobile learning. This page is a great starting point for anyone looking into mobile learning and its impact on diverse communities of learners. A very worth while read and bookmark.

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Bloom's Taxonomy & Visual Knowledge Management: Working in Teams (Part 2)

"Published on Jan 10, 2013: Part 2 in a series, this video is a description of the analog and digital tools we use at Alphachimp for visual management of knowledge as we work on projects in teams."

from source:  http://youtu.be/aSd2u7HK8II

ghbrett's insight:

In this presentation Peter Durand expands on the Cognition aspect and how it transitions from a personal system into a team based system for management processes and information about projects. This includes the pre-cursor elements as well as the management of projects. Again he describes analog tools as well as digital tools. These are set in the context of the "team" and the roles the "individual" plays as a member of the team working on a project.

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Commonwealth of Learning - Quality Assurance Toolkit for Open and Distance Non-formal Education

Commonwealth of Learning - Quality Assurance Toolkit for Open and Distance Non-formal Education | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"This Quality Assurance (QA) toolkit will be a useful resource for non-formal education and training (NFE) policy makers, programme managers, in-field staff and researchers working through governmental, non-governmental and community-based organisations, development assistance agencies and funding bodies. ... Quality assurance (QA) systems applied in educational contexts are generally concerned with inputs ... In this toolkit, we propose a different approach: the evaluation of the programmes’ outcomes, outputs and impacts." from source: http://www.col.org/
ghbrett's insight:
This report in PDF format covers a level set with definitions of their terminology, case studies of different teaching/training communities, and the elements with a framework for quality assurance processes of education/training. The report was issued in May 2012. It is worth a read, especially the Fourth Section on the QA processes and framework.
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Cloud Computing University and Certification by Rackspace

"CloudU is a vendor-neutral curriculum designed for business owners and technical professionals who want to bolster their knowledge of the fundamentals of Cloud Computing. At CloudU, you’ll find a comprehensive series of original whitepapers, live and on-demand webinars, events, blogs, videos and e-books aimed at increasing Cloud Computing knowledge among businesses. The program is a collaborative effort between Rackspace® Hosting and industry analyst, entrepreneur and commentator Ben Kepes of Diversity Limited. The content of CloudU isn’t vendor-specific. Anyone looking at moving to the Cloud, regardless of vendor or platform, can benefit from CloudU.

 

... About the CloudU Certificate

CloudU is a curriculum designed for business owners and technical professionals who want to boost their knowledge of the fundamentals of Cloud Computing. By completing all 10 CloudU Lessons and sitting for a final online exam, professionals can earn a CloudU Certificate demonstrating their command of the most important topics in Cloud Computing. You can learn more about how you can earn your CloudU Certificate here." from source: http://www.rackspace.com/knowledge_center/cloudu/

ghbrett's insight:

CloudU is just one of a growing number of technical or topic specific education programs integrating blended learning to fullfil unmet needs. Similar to traditional education they do distance learning by taking advantage of Web 2.0, Social Media, and interactive multimedia (e.g., audio & video podcasts, video conferencing, or video on demand) for classes and collaboration.

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20 Eye-Opening Stats You Probably Didn't Know About Mobile Learning

20 Eye-Opening Stats You Probably Didn't Know About Mobile Learning | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Still not convinced Mobile Learning is something your organization should evaluate? Consider these eye-opening statistics published by different organizations such as ASTD, iPass, Towards Maturity and Ambient Insight. Data from their most recent surveys reveals some interesting facts that you might be interested in.

 

We’ve collected these facts about mobile learning to make the case for why all of us (consumers and eLearning professionals alike) need to take notice of the implications of mobile in the learning industry. "

from source: http://fluency21.com/

 

#mLearning #smartphones #tablets #wireless #collaboration #statistics #teaching #training #working #instructional-design #instruction

ghbrett's insight:

The list of twenty statistics about Mobile Learning come from reports by well known research companies, eLearning and Instructional Design organizations. The information covers a broad range of mobile platforms and how they are being used not only for training and education, but also for collaborative work. This article has many links to original sources that serve to provide the reader more in depth detail about the topics. This is a good resource in addition to being informative itself.

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Banyan - Share, Collaborate & Publish Research

"Banyan makes it easy for scientists to share, publish, and collaborate what they are working on. We are building modern tools for the modern scientist.

 

... Research should not be thwarted by an industry run on the privatization of information. Instead, it should be enhanced by open access. Open access allows the knowledge of scientific research to be easily accessible to any audience. The open access movement began 19 years ago with Steven Harnad’s Subversive Proposal. By making published work freely accessible to people, it provides a platform for academics to share their knowledge. This movement has already begun in other countries with mandates for open access in Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Iceland, and Australia.

 

This movement cannot move forward unless we are willing to take a stand on this problem. Every researcher, librarian, university administrator and funding body should promote open access before this movement takes off. Our goal with Banyan is to give everyone an equal seat at the table. We want to level the playing field of research. We invite researchers to use Banyan to recapitulate scholarly communication and expand the distribution of information."

from source: https://banyan.co/publish

 

#Banyan #Banyan-Publish #Chattanooga #SaaS $#nterprise-Software #CloudComputing #Collaboration #LaTex #GIT #GIT-Hub
#MarkDown #Mark-Down

ghbrett's insight:

This innovative service uses the LaTex authoring system which has been in use for many years by the Scientific and Mathematics communities in order to create complex algorithms for print purposes. Banyan Publish combines LaTEX with the collaborative project with version control using the repository, Git Hub ( https://github.com/ ). In addition Banyan Publish uses Markdown, from Wikipedia: "The language takes many cues from existing conventions for marking up plain text in email. Markdown formatted text should be readable as-is, without looking like it's been marked up with tags or formatting instructions, unlike text which has been formatted with a Markup language, such as HTML, which has obvious tags and formatting instructions. Markdown is a formatting syntax for text that can be read by humans and can be easily converted to HTML."

( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markdown )

 

Banyan Publish is a freemium service that allows a single user free access and then has reasonable pricing for teams and for enterprises. There are growing numbers of online projects that use Git Hub to manage documents as well as application development. This facility along with simplified Markdown will make Banyan Publish a useful tool for many communities, small groups, and enterprise projects

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Seven steps to the perfect story

Seven steps to the perfect story | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Via José Carlos
ghbrett's insight:

This is a very good infographic that offers the viewer a very useful visual process for creating stories in various media appropriate to the content and audience. 

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Lauren Scime's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:46 PM

I would have to call this the "Joseph Campbell Lite" Infographic - still, a useful resource if only a reminder of the classic monomythic storytelling recipe.

Mervi Rauhala's curator insight, July 30, 2013 1:59 AM

Clever infographic!

 

John Thomas's curator insight, February 12, 6:07 AM
Seven steps to the perfect story
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Wikipatterns - Wiki Patterns

Wikipatterns - Wiki Patterns | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Looking to spur wiki adoption? Want to grow from 10 users to 100, or 1000? Applying patterns that help coordinate people's efforts and guide the growth of content, and recognizing anti-patterns that might hinder growth - can give your wiki the greatest chance of success.

 

Wikipatterns.com is a toolbox of patterns & anti-patterns, and a guide to the stages of wiki adoption. It's also a wiki, which means you can help build the information based on your experiences! Beyond this site, there are many other additional resources." from source: - http://www.wikipatterns.com/

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ghbrett's curator insight, July 8, 2013 9:31 AM

This is a good source of information about the use of Wikis in general. The two targets are People and Adoption. The site presents the positive aspects as well as barriers or negative aspects of Wikis. A reader or person interested in developing online communities would gain from viewing some of these patterns as useful for other instructional design, social media, online communities, communities of practice,  or online media in organizations.

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13 Reasons Your Brain Craves Infographics [Infographic]

13 Reasons Your Brain Craves Infographics [Infographic] | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
This is downright spooky. It's an interactive infographic all about why your brain craves infographics. Food for thought!

Via Gust MEES, Jim Lerman, Ally Greer
ghbrett's insight:

As the old saying goes: "A picture is worth a thousand words." This also reminds me of Malcomb Gladwell's book, "Blink." Amazon: http://amzn.to/13AalVQ

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Caroline Price's comment, July 16, 2013 2:56 AM
Draw pictures!
Andrea Remmert's curator insight, July 30, 2013 10:41 PM

It's all about images now. 

Bruce McDuffee's curator insight, August 20, 2013 11:53 AM

It's important to keep in mind your audience and how the ideal prospect likes to consume content.  Scientists or engineers for example my consume or respect different media than consumers of clothing or electronics.

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Future Trends in Technology and Education

Future Trends in Technology and Education | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Future Trends in Technology and Education is a monthly report. It surveys recent developments in how education is changing, primarily under the impact of digital technologies. Its purpose is to help educators, policy-makers, and the public think about the future of teaching, learning, research, and institutions.

 

Every month FTTE aggregates recent developments, checking them against previously-identified trendlines. As certain trends build in support and significance, the report recommends watching them for future impact. FTTE also notes trends which appear to be declining in significance."

-- from source: http://bryanalexander.org/

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ghbrett's curator insight, June 18, 2013 12:53 PM

Bryan Alexander is not only one of the leading Thought Leaders of Technology for Education, Training, and Research; he is one of the most scholarly, well grounded, sharing people I know. His work is based on fact with a dab of opinion from others as well as himself. His eyes, ears, and haptic senses are sensitive to opportunities and trends. Bryan's voice asks the difficult but important questions. Then his synthesis of this input is shared openly with us. He is an essential part of the future. That is why you should quickly take advantage of his offer to share his new monthly report "Future Trends in Technology and Education."

Howard Rheingold's comment, June 18, 2013 12:58 PM
I agree with George. Follow this if you are interested in the topic.
ghbrett's comment, June 18, 2013 1:01 PM
Thanks Howard!
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5 Characteristics Of Global Learning

5 Characteristics Of Global Learning | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"This post is more about the characteristics of that kind of approach to learning. As globalization becomes more and more inevitable, understanding where we’re drifting might help us make adjustments as we go, yes? The characteristics are numerous and we could almost start anywhere, but five broad characteristics appear below.
1. Local –> Global pattern
2. Self-Directed
3. Iterative & Spiraled
4. Social & Digital
5. Drive By New Actuators"
from source:http://www.teachthought.com/

ghbrett's insight:

While this post is brief, the points are well made. Another thought is "Global" as I understand it here is trans-national, that is, it is crossing international boundaries. I think that Organizations and Agencies that deal with non-traditional students, staff or employees world wide should consider these five elements as well.

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bobembry's Life-TIME Investment System © ℠ ::: RLA + Exp

bobembry's Life-TIME Investment System © ℠ ::: RLA + Exp | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"rlaexp.com = Real Life Adventures + Exploration

 

... This page is an introductory brainroad for exploring some of the major aspects of our unfolding knowledge economy and knowledge society.

 

... The purpose of this entire site: preparing for a different world and different future across multiple time spans in one’s life and the lives of those connected to you through time: associates in your organizations across time and parent to child to grandchild. Additionally, every topic can be viewed from several vantage points: a top manager looking at other organization members; organization members looking at each other; citizens looking at organizations and their members; an organization looking for acquisition targets … There are serious implications attached to each of these and they are in the news almost everyday." from source: http://rlaexp.com/

ghbrett's insight:

This very long page prints out to be 60 pages long, but it is full of facts, images, knowledge, wisdom, controversial notions, ideas, excitement, and more thoughtful information than I have seen together in one place for a long time. It is one of those resources that becomes a starting point or at least a side journey for those who are engaged in information technology, communication, collaboration, computing, and applied knowledge.

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Three Kinds of MOOCs « Lisa's (Online) Teaching Blog

"We are so into MOOCs now that it’s too much for me. Gotta apply Ockham’s Razor 2.0 to this stuff.

 

At the Ed-Media conference, I attended a session by Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. In her discussion of Troubleshooting MOOCs, she noted the dificulties in determining her own direction in offering a MOOC in the “Stanford model” MOOCs versus the “connectivism” MOOCs. I found myself breaking it down into three categories instead. 


Each type of MOOC has all three elements (networks, tasks and content), but each has a goal that is dominant.

 

Network-based MOOCs are the original MOOCs, taught by Alec Couros, George Siemens, Stephen Downes, Dave Cormier. The goal is not so much content and skills acquisition, but conversation, socially constructed knowledge, and exposure to the milieu of learning on the open web using distributed means. The pedagogy of network-based MOOCs is based in connectivist or connectivist-style methods. Resources are provided, but exploration is more important than any particular content. Traditional assessment is difficult.

 

Task-based MOOCs emphasize skills in the sense that they ask the learner to complete certain types of work. In Jim Groom’s ds106 at UMW, the learning is distributed and the formats variable. There are many options for completing each assignment, but a certain number and variety of assignments need to be done to perform the skills. Similarly, our POT Certificate Class focuses on different topics for each week, and skills are demonstrated through sections on design, audio, video etc. in an effort to expose learners to many different formats and styles in online teaching. Community is crucial, particularly for examples and assistance, but it is a secondary goal. Pedagogy of task-based MOOCs tend to be a mix of instructivism and constructivism. Traditional assessment is difficult here too.

 

Content-based MOOCs are the ones with huge enrollments, commercial prospects, big university professors, automated testing, and exposure in the popular press. Community is difficult but may be highly significant to the participants, or one can go it alone. Content acquisition is more important in these classes than either networking or task completion, and they tend to use instructivist pedagogy. Traditional assessment, both formative and summative, may be emphasized. Mass participation seems to imply mass processing." from source: http://lisahistory.net/

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ghbrett's curator insight, May 6, 2013 6:34 AM

Good post, points to SideShare post bye Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. ( http://slidesha.re/11NFMs9 ). Apparently the notion of MOOCs as a fad is settling down. Now educators, trainers, and others are beginning to better understand the development, content, design, and processes involved in running a MOOC. Also, there is a growing paradox in this space, the term "Open" occasionally does not imply free. I can imagine that there will be emerging pricing schedules from free to various fees set by the MOOC publishers.

Difundi's curator insight, June 13, 2:41 PM

Explicación simple y clara de los tipos de MOOC: Network-based, Task-based, Content-based.

 

El modelo que sigue Difundi es el en el que se basa OpenMOOC, software en el que se basa y que fundamentalmente se encuadra en el tercer tipo (Content-based) pero, que puede tener fuerte componente del primer tipo (Network-based) si se hace uso de servicios externos en la nube, como son blogs, redes, documentos colaborativos, etc.

 

La calidad de los contenidos y la dinamización de un MOOC son elementos clave y depende de ello, que la tasa de terminación sea alta. Si la dimensión Network-based de un MOOC es mayor, más y mejor dinamización necesitará.

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Bloom's Taxonomy & Visual Knowledge Management: Applying Knowledge in Teams (Part 3)

"Published on Jan 10, 2013: This third video in the series, uses the cognitive "slice" of Bloom's Taxonomy to audit the digital and analog tools our organization uses to apply knowledge as a team.
Category: Education"
from source: http://youtu.be/6rDLzktQ13E

ghbrett's insight:

This is the third video of the trilogy of Cognition from Bloom's Taxonomy by Peter Durand. In this one focuses on the topics of Apply, Evaluate, and Create. Durand describes how the team works through each with different analog and digital tools. He does this in a clear and visual manner that does a great job of explaining the relationship of the tools to the processes as he did in each of the prior two tutorial videos. This series is worth the time to watch for any developer or project manager who has access to the Internet and the tools Durand mentions. Thank you Peter!

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Bloom's Taxonomy & Knowledge Management Tools (Part 1)

"Published on Jan 8, 2013: I don't know about you, but I have a hard time remembering stuff.

 

Thank goodness there are a billion-and-a-half books, apps, tools and methods for "helping" me. Here are my top 3 digital tools and top 3 physical tools for remembering stuff.

 

In this first video of a series, I break apart one of the most fundamental models of the education world: Bloom's Taxonomy.

 

>Peter Durand, Founder & CEO
>Alphachimp University
> http://www.AlphachimpU.com"

 

from source: http://youtu.be/-xPFCqw2_a4

ghbrett's insight:

A nine minute video that simply addresses a section of Bloom's Taxonomy: Cognition. It includes a explanation of a mnemonic model. Also, he shares 3 analog tools and 3 digital tools that he uses to assist with remembering the information he has to work with.

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Education Futures | Moving beyond Education 2.0

From John Moravec "There’s a lot of talk about moving to “Education 2.0″ –but, what would Education 3.0 look like?

 

Here’s my take [a matrix image] on the Education 1.0 – 3.0 spectrum:" from source: http://www.educationfutures.com

ghbrett's insight:

This is an interesting and prescient take on the direction of Education by John Moravec. I don't really care about the number 1.0 - 2.0 - 3.0. The meat for me are the short descriptions of where he saw education / training going in 2008. The comments are an interesting read as well since they provide a dialog with additional resources as well as questions and rebuttal to John's vision. Thanks to +John Graves for sharing this link with me.

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