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Topics related to distance eLearning in academia and other organizations
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Peer Learning Handbook | Peeragogy.org

"The editors of the Peeragogy Handbook are delighted to announce that the revised, second edition of the Handbook (“Version 2″) will be published on Public Domain Day 2014 (1 Jan. ’14). The Handbook is the world’s first book to present Peeragogy, a synthesis of techniques for collaborative learning and collaborative work. Itself the result of the techniques it presents, this version features a new Foreword from the Internet pioneer and collaboration thinker, Stanford University educator, and founding editor of the Handbook, Howard Rheingold.

 

The Handbook has drawn praise from leading Peer-to-Peer theorist Michel Bauwens, Research Director of the Free/Libre Open Knowledge Society (a project at the Instituto de Altos Estudios Nacionales (IAEN) national university in Ecuador, with support of the Ecuadorian Ministry of Human Resource and Knowledge): “Rheingold and a great team of collaborators have preceded the rest of humanity in exploring the new dynamics of technologically-enhanced peer learning,” said Bauwens." -- From Source: http://peeragogy.org

 

#peeragogy #peer-learning #collaborative-learning #opensource

ghbrett's insight:

It was an intense and exciting project to be part of the editorial team. This Handbook is an outstanding resource for any one interested in using existing and emerging online technologies for peer and collaborative learning. It is online now at Peeragogy.org

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Jeroen Boon's curator insight, January 6, 2014 5:21 PM

Learning by p2p networks is important for disruptive innovation and also accelation of innovation. We live in exponential times!

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Digital Humanism — Technology + Liberal Arts

Digital Humanism — Technology + Liberal Arts | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Digital Humanism


. . . Technology has bequeathed to the liberal arts a new, more expansive life. But the liberal arts also have lessons to bequeath, and we ignore them at our peril.

 

. . . We are in the midst of a great sea change. Humanists are swimming, and occasionally sinking, in an embarrassment of informational riches. The hierarchies that historically made the liberal arts possible are crumbling. Like it or not, technology is the driving force in a new, digital humanism

 

. . . If we take from the liberal arts one guideline on how to inhabit an increasingly non-analog world, it should be this digital humanities mission statement: 'to remain aware of the uncertain, varied, unruly terrain of human existence even as that existence gets represented in digital form.'" from source: https://medium.com/technology-liberal-arts/

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ghbrett's curator insight, May 19, 2013 5:56 PM

This blog post while focused on the Digital Humanities can be applied to many other disciplines that traditionally did not engage with computers. Well, there are always exceptions, but the use of information technology, communications, and computing were not pervasive.

 

I remember way back when the Macintosh first came out. I was supporting academic computing for the University of North Carolina System which included the contract for microcomputers. I have a Masters of Fine Arts and so when I planned a visit to one campus I called the Dean of the School of the Arts. I explained I'd like to show her this new computer that supported drawing, typography, and foreign language much better than anything else we had. A new first for the Arts. She wasn't interested. She said that the only computer she needed was between her ears, a pencil in her hand for output, and paper to draw on. Times have changed. A sub-text of this tale is that Technology continues to change for better and sometimes worse. It is important to keep an open mind. It is also important to listen to both sides of discussions about the applications and their value. At the moment I feel deja vu with Cloud Computing and the olde days of Mainframes in glass rooms. What would you do if you couldn't access all the Google apps and services for a week or a month? Some say no problem, others would suffer.

 

As the author of the blog says about a digital humanities mission statement, "to remain aware of the uncertain, varied, unruly terrain of human existence even as that existence gets represented in digital form." Keep your eyes open, look for opportunities, and watch your back. Thanks to @verbagetruck for the reminder.

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The 12 Trends That Will Rule Products In 2013

The 12 Trends That Will Rule Products In 2013 | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Near the end of 2012, a group of us at Ziba got together to review what we’d learned over the course of the year. Working with dozens of clients who serve customers around the world, we designers spend a lot of time observing people as they interact with technology, services, and experiences, noticing how they seek solutions to everyday problems and make decisions. In the process, certain patterns emerge so forcefully that they’re practically unavoidable.

 

Meeting over three sessions spread out over a week, 23 Zibites (designers, researchers, and creative directors) discussed the patterns we’d seen, and distilled them down to the 12 insights we thought were most current and useful, to us and to our clients. Each one is presented here, as a brief essay that suggests how it will affect business practices in 2013, and as an illustration created by one of Ziba’s designers." - from Source: http://www.fastcodesign.com

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ghbrett's curator insight, February 26, 2013 11:55 AM

This article is a really good read because the twelve insights are not just about design, retail or marketing. They deal with services and innovation. I believe this article will be relevant to people in education, training, innovation,and tinkering.

 

The twelve insight titles are below. Each includes a brief description, some have graphics to support the insight.
1. The Mind Is A Competitive Environment.
2. Customer-Facing Employees Are Your Brain And Your Backbone.
3. Analog Will Never Go Away.
4. Worth Is Determined By Philosophy, Not Price.
5. Narrative Is A Delivery Vehicle To Make Information Stick.
6. Repair And Repurpose Are The New Killer Apps.
7. Technology Moves Too Fast To Care About.
8. Flawless Function Is Tomorrow’s Great User Experience.
9. Brand Loyalty Is How We Escape Decision Fatigue.
10. Human Interaction Has Never Been More Precious.
11. Gen Y Is Creating Its Own Service Economy
12. Everyone Is A Specialist.

 

As you can see there is a mix of focal points. As I said before from service to objects. From story telling, training, collaborating, to designing, making and repurposing stuff.


My Thanks to Ziba for this insightful article. [ http://www.ziba.com ]

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7 Ways Higher Ed Faculty Can Evolve

7 Ways Higher Ed Faculty Can Evolve | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Here is the list of the topics that are explored in greater depth in this post:

1. Be willing to be a pioneer
2. Do research that’s useful and benefits the community
3. Treat funding as a means to an end, not an end in itself
4. Focus on adding value, not just transferring data to students
5. Embrace new pedagogical methods
6. Welcome collaboration
7. Look to the past

-- Source: http://www.teachthought.com/

ghbrett's insight:

Not only do the authors present the list of topics, but also two important pieces of information: 1) a link to related information and 2) a paragraph briefly explaining the value of the topic with embedded links to even more related information. All in all this post is the starting point for loads of information about these digital evolution topics.

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IBM senses change with its annual “5-in-5” list for 2012

IBM senses change with its annual “5-in-5” list for 2012 | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"As the year nears its close, IBM, as it has every year since 2006, has pulled out the crystal ball and given us its predictions of five innovations that it believes will impact our lives in the next five years. For this year’s “5-in-5” list, IBM has taken a slightly different approach, with each entry on the list relating to our senses. The company believes cognitive computing whereby computers learn rather than passively relying on programming will be at the core of these innovations, enabling systems that will enhance and augment each of our five senses." - from source http://www.gizmag.com/
ghbrett's insight:

This article is much like the New Media Consortium "Horizon Reports" but focusing on the 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing, and seeing. Each sense is a visual graphic based on an authors collection of projections related to that topic. It is worth taking the time to read, view each image, think on the projections, and then go through them one more time with the intent of connection the 5 projections into one holistic projection.

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 18, 2012 6:52 PM

This article is much like the New Media Consortium "Horizon Reports" but focusing on the 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing, and seeing. Each sense is a visual graphic based on an authors collection of projections related to that topic. It is worth taking the time to read, view each image, think on the projections, and then go through them one more time with the intent of connection the 5 projections into one holistic projection.

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Instructional Design Documents

Instructional Design Documents | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"...“DesignDoc” is a formal outline of what will be developed for a course, as in an Instructional Design Document. This document can be used to map out what will be developed and is often used as an agreement of work to be done before development starts. My experience has been that every workplace has its own version, requirements, and format, but the elements are pretty consistent." -- from source: http://mvenable.wordpress.com/

 

Note: This is another posting from Dr. Venable's blog. Although it is from way back in 2010 the information is still quite relevant. She presents an extensive outline of the elements mentioned above. Plus she includes links to resources and reading materials that support her check list for developing Instructional Design projects. It is a good starting point for new instructional designers. and may provide new insights for more experienced instructional designers.

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Don’t use a 2.0 technology in a 1.0 way

Don’t use a 2.0 technology in a 1.0 way | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

“And that's the grand dilemma of social networking: it's intended to allow participation, to let companies and individuals all engage and interact, but a...

 

As we have progressed, not only in our use of technology but also our understanding of effective leadership, we know that communication includes effective talking but, more importantly, listening. Being able to hear what is being said from those we serve is extremely important to how we develop our schools, and the conversation is extremely valuable. Yet, many schools and organizations use social media in the old fashion: sharing information but not having a conversation. In reality, just because you have ears doesn’t mean you are listening.

 

 



NOTE: Moving from print to web, we used to talk about "shovelware" which was just pasting word processing files into web pages. This article explores how new tech processes are slowly diffused to do what they are intended too. We need to consider the unintended consequences and uses of these new tools as well."


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES, Teaching, Learning & Developing with Technology, Louise Robinson-Lay, Ricard Garcia, Thomas Faltin, Jim Doyle, Jimun Gimm
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Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, November 16, 2012 9:31 AM
Glad you liked this Gust!
Gust MEES's comment, November 16, 2012 9:48 AM
Hi Ana, thx very much! Looks like You had seen my Tweet about lack of knowledge about Social Media with Government and prompt there is a nice article from Ana to amplify my message ;) Have a great week-end :)
Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, November 16, 2012 11:04 AM
You too Gust! Yes, I did see them and thought how funny it was that we were both on the same wavelength! Have a relaxing weekend :-)
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8 Types of Technology That Will Be Essential in the 2015 Workplace

"If technology continues to evolve at the current rate, the 2015 workplace could look quite different from today's office spaces -- and may even involve less traditional office space with the rise of telecommuting. From a company's hiring process to sharing knowledge with employees, technology has the ability to change the way we all work.

 

What technology will be essential in the 2015 workplace, but doesn't exist yet?" from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com

 

NOTE: This short post has 8 thought worthy services and technology that would prove mighty helpful in this digital world that is more complex every day. I like the info for "Learning Academies to Keep Up With New Knowledge" (aka Lifelong Learning).

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Frederic Hohl's curator insight, February 6, 2014 6:26 AM

What your working place might look in 2015?

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Don't Confuse Technology With Teaching

Don't Confuse Technology With Teaching | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

The Chronicle of Higher Education

Commentary - Aug 13, 2012 - Pamela Hieronymi

 

  "Education is not the transmission of information or ideas. Education is the training needed to make use of information and ideas. As information breaks loose from bookstores and libraries and floods onto computers and mobile devices, that training becomes more important, not less.

  Educators are coaches, personal trainers in intellectual fitness. The value we add to the media extravaganza is like the value the trainer adds to the gym or the coach adds to the equipment. We provide individualized instruction in how to evaluate and make use of information and ideas, teaching people how to think for themselves." - from the source

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Innovating Pedagogy | Open University Innovations Report #1

Innovating Pedagogy | Open University Innovations Report #1 | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"This series of reports explores new forms of teaching, learning and assessment for an interactive world, to guide teachers and policy makers in productive innovation. The first report proposes ten innovations that are already in currency but have not yet had a profound influence on education." - from the Source

 

NOTE: Similar to the horizon reports this series will look closely at new media and emerging technology that will impact education and training.

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Future Trends in Technology and Education

Future Trends in Technology and Education | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Future Trends in Technology and Education is a monthly report. It surveys recent developments in how education is changing, primarily under the impact of digital technologies. Its purpose is to help educators, policy-makers, and the public think about the future of teaching, learning, research, and institutions.

 

Every month FTTE aggregates recent developments, checking them against previously-identified trendlines. As certain trends build in support and significance, the report recommends watching them for future impact. FTTE also notes trends which appear to be declining in significance."

-- from source: http://bryanalexander.org/

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ghbrett's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:53 PM

Bryan Alexander is not only one of the leading Thought Leaders of Technology for Education, Training, and Research; he is one of the most scholarly, well grounded, sharing people I know. His work is based on fact with a dab of opinion from others as well as himself. His eyes, ears, and haptic senses are sensitive to opportunities and trends. Bryan's voice asks the difficult but important questions. Then his synthesis of this input is shared openly with us. He is an essential part of the future. That is why you should quickly take advantage of his offer to share his new monthly report "Future Trends in Technology and Education."

Howard Rheingold's comment, June 18, 2013 3:58 PM
I agree with George. Follow this if you are interested in the topic.
ghbrett's comment, June 18, 2013 4:01 PM
Thanks Howard!
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bobembry's Life-TIME Investment System © ℠ ::: RLA + Exp

bobembry's Life-TIME Investment System © ℠ ::: RLA + Exp | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"rlaexp.com = Real Life Adventures + Exploration

 

... This page is an introductory brainroad for exploring some of the major aspects of our unfolding knowledge economy and knowledge society.

 

... The purpose of this entire site: preparing for a different world and different future across multiple time spans in one’s life and the lives of those connected to you through time: associates in your organizations across time and parent to child to grandchild. Additionally, every topic can be viewed from several vantage points: a top manager looking at other organization members; organization members looking at each other; citizens looking at organizations and their members; an organization looking for acquisition targets … There are serious implications attached to each of these and they are in the news almost everyday." from source: http://rlaexp.com/

ghbrett's insight:

This very long page prints out to be 60 pages long, but it is full of facts, images, knowledge, wisdom, controversial notions, ideas, excitement, and more thoughtful information than I have seen together in one place for a long time. It is one of those resources that becomes a starting point or at least a side journey for those who are engaged in information technology, communication, collaboration, computing, and applied knowledge.

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SocialFish | MUST READ: Clay Shirky on Disruption

SocialFish | MUST READ: Clay Shirky on Disruption | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Now, this imminent disruption to higher education that Shirky goes on to describe is not a new topic, at least not in social media circles where we love to discuss the disruption of anything and everything (and, in fact, wrote a book about it).  But the higher education issue is one that I am concerned that not enough associations are thinking about (that I can see).  Associations, most of them anyway, are in the business of professional development for the people in their industries.  Are you positioning yourself to be part of the new world of social learning when it starts to happen overnight?  What happens to the millions of new college graduates in a couple of years who are used to learning online? Will they find the educational resources they need from your association website?  Will it be easy to navigate?  Will they be able to share educational courses, or videos, or quizzes, or anything else with their peers on a topic-by-topic basis?  Will they be able to include their peers, including some who may not specifically be signed up to your webinars, in their learning?  Will they find it easy to conduct online discussions around your educational content with people across the globe and in different time zones?  Will they be able to dip in and out however they please?  Will they be able to get the CE/CME/CPE/CEU and every other continuing education credit they might need in the ways that they need them?" from the source: http://www.socialfish.org/

ghbrett's insight:

For the past decade or more Higher Education, among other industries, has lived in a climate of paradox. This reviewer was on the "Academic Computing" side of the fence where the innovators and free range chickens were exploring new technologies (aka "shiny new toy"), but at the same time making contributions to the corpus of knowledge that the Academy demands. On the other side of the fence were the "Administrative Computing" folk. They represented the business aspects of education. Their reputation was much like a secret society that kept everything locked up and hidden from the world. Since then there have been different attempts to blend libraries with academic computing, administrative computing, and oh yes, telephones and television on campus. Pardon the long prelude, but this article is a refreshing lead into a post from Clay Shirkey on the "imminent disruption to higher education" in general from social media, open everything, ubiquitous computing. And believe it or not, the new digital generation does know where the OFF SWITCH is. The problem is that many of the older generation don't know where the ON SWITCH in.

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What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning

What 100 Experts Think About The Future Of Learning | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"If you’re an educator, surely you know that technology has and will continue to have an incredible impact on learning. Whether it’s the Internet, innovative learning tools, or teaching technology itself, these two subjects are intertwined. In these talks, you will find essential information for educators concerned with technology." - from the source: https://www.teachthought.com

ghbrett's insight:

This is a good bibliographic style post that has links to 100 resources in topics of where teaching, learning, training, eLearning, and educational technologies are headed. Many of these link are sources from leaders in their respective communities. This is a worthwhile read.

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Napster, Udacity, and the Academy -- Clay Shirky

"Once you see this pattern—a new story rearranging people’s sense of the possible, with the incumbents the last to know—you see it everywhere. First, the people running the old system don’t notice the change. When they do, they assume it’s minor. Then that it’s a niche. Then a fad. And by the time they understand that the world has actually changed, they’ve squandered most of the time they had to adapt.

 

It’s been interesting watching this unfold in music, books, newspapers, TV, but nothing has ever been as interesting to me as watching it happen in my own backyard. Higher education is now being disrupted; our MP3 is the massive open online course (or MOOC), and our Napster is Udacity, the education startup.

 

We have several advantages over the recording industry, of course. We are decentralized and mostly non-profit. We employ lots of smart people. We have previous examples to learn from, and our core competence is learning from the past. And armed with these advantages, we’re probably going to screw this up as badly as the music people did."
- from the source: http://www.shirky.com/

 

NOTE: A well written cautious piece about the barriers to diffusion of new media, new technology, and new ways to teach, learn, or train. Definitely worth reading.

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Top 10 Learning Tools – 2012

Top 10 Learning Tools – 2012 | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Are you familiar with the Centre for Learning and Performance Technologies (C4LPT) annual “Top 100 Tools for Learning” project? Led by Jane Hart, this is a collaborative effort in which learning professionals all over the world submit their top 10 tools for the year. This year more than 500 submissions were included.

 

I’ve contributed to the project over the last several years, but having missed the deadline for the latest list, I thought I’d go ahead and post my thoughts here. As a blogger, freelance instructional designer, and adjunct online instructor, these are the 10 tools that have been the most helpful to me over the past year (in no particular order)" -- from source: http://mvenable.wordpress.com/

NOTE: While the top ten tools are applications and services that many of us use already, Dr. Venable, an Instructional Designer among other talents, presents brief rationale for each of her top ten picks. She also points to the C4LPT list of "Top 100 Tools for Learning." This is worth a look. While you're on her site, have a look at her "About" page for more information of her work and interests.

 

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A look at 2013 and beyond

A look at 2013 and beyond | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"Download the white paper to learn:
The biggest change in online training
Why workers need to collaborate and share knowledge
8 trends to expect in 2013 and beyond
And more..." - from source http://learn.gototraining.com
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Gartner's 2012 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Identifies "Tipping Point" Technologies That Will Unlock Long-Awaited Technology Scenarios

Gartner's 2012 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Identifies "Tipping Point" Technologies That Will Unlock Long-Awaited Technology Scenarios | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"Big data, 3D printing, activity streams, Internet TV, Near Field Communication (NFC) payment, cloud computing and media tablets are some of the fastest-moving technologies identified in Gartner Inc.'s 2012 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies.

 

Gartner analysts said that these technologies have moved noticeably along the Hype Cycle since 2011, while consumerization is now expected to reach the Plateau of Productivity in two to five years, down from five to 10 years in 2011. Bring your own device (BYOD), 3D printing and social analytics are some of the technologies identified at the Peak of Inflated Expectations in this year's Emerging Technologies Hype Cycle" - from source

 

NOTE: The Gartner Hype Cycle 2012 is recommended reading from the New Media Consortium.

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University of Minnesota releases e-book about academic technology | Inside Higher Ed

University of Minnesota releases e-book about academic technology | Inside Higher Ed | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"The (E-book) addresses four overarching topics -- ideas for transforming teaching methods, solutions to specific classroom problems, examples of campus leaders providing direction and support for these efforts, and ways the university is spreading its innovation off campus" - from Source

 

NOTE: there is a link to the PDF version of the E-Book in the article. It is worth reading

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