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Topics related to distance eLearning in academia and other organizations
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'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Many emails now being created, and thus potentially archived by libraries, are the contemporary equivalent not of paper letters, but of phone calls - which, with few exceptions, were unrecorded, and really were lost to history. 

 

... In terms of digital literary archives, one of the lessons for today's archivists is that so-called e-manuscripts are highly unstable, and need early curatorial intervention to secure them against the threats of technological obsolescence. This means that the writers involved become increasingly aware of interest in their papers, and for novelist Jonathan Franzen, this changes everything: 'Unfortunately, I think that once writers become self-conscious about preserving archival material, the game is over...I also don't see how you resist the temptation to select material that suggests the most flattering narratives. And not just select, but actively create!' ..." - from the Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

ghbrett's insight:

his post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

more...
ghbrett's curator insight, January 13, 2013 8:12 AM

This post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

 

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10 Predictions for Personalized Learning for 2013

10 Predictions for Personalized Learning for 2013 | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
Check out what Personalized Learning will be like in 2013.

Via Kathleen McClaskey, João Greno Brogueira, Heiko Idensen
ghbrett's insight:

Empowerment is the key theme of these 10 predictions for personal learning. The article explains each in more detail about why and how they will affect personal learning.
1. Connected Learners
2. Mobile Devices
3. Communities of Practice
4. Evidence of Learning
5. Taking Risks
6. Storytelling
7. Learner Voice and Choice
8. Unpacking Standards
9. Transforming Learning Environments
10. Building a Common Language

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Serge Renard's curator insight, April 30, 2013 7:18 AM

http://proser.renard.free.fr/

Serge Renard's curator insight, April 30, 2013 7:20 AM

http://proser.renard.free.fr/

Thomas Salmon's curator insight, May 6, 2013 1:34 PM

Interesting, in other ways this could also be seen as framing learning as a constant performance of assessment. Where do you draw the line ?