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The Future of You

The Future of You | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"HBR Blog Network: The Future of You by Tomas Chamorro


... Economic and technological changes are reshaping the nature of work. Having a great job does not guarantee your career success; your competence no longer depends on what you know; and being an affluent consumer matters less than becoming a sought-after product. Welcome to a new era of work, where your future depends on being a signal in the noisy universe of human capital. In order to achieve this, you will need to master three things: self-branding, entrepreneurship, and hyperconnectivity."


from source: - http://blogs.hbr.org/

#future #self-branding #entrepreneurship #hyperconnectivity

ghbrett's insight:

This topic usual  focuses on tools, processes, instructional design, elearning and elearning delivery. However, this article is important for you the teacher, mentor, or instructional designer. It is important as presenting an outcome that you should strive for your students or apprentices, collaborators, and yourselves to attain. Especially in these rapidly challenging and changes times of Desing and Service oriented work ecologies. Brief, but to the point, it is recommended reading.

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Digital Humanism — Technology + Liberal Arts

Digital Humanism — Technology + Liberal Arts | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Digital Humanism


. . . Technology has bequeathed to the liberal arts a new, more expansive life. But the liberal arts also have lessons to bequeath, and we ignore them at our peril.

 

. . . We are in the midst of a great sea change. Humanists are swimming, and occasionally sinking, in an embarrassment of informational riches. The hierarchies that historically made the liberal arts possible are crumbling. Like it or not, technology is the driving force in a new, digital humanism

 

. . . If we take from the liberal arts one guideline on how to inhabit an increasingly non-analog world, it should be this digital humanities mission statement: 'to remain aware of the uncertain, varied, unruly terrain of human existence even as that existence gets represented in digital form.'" from source: https://medium.com/technology-liberal-arts/

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ghbrett's curator insight, May 19, 2013 5:56 PM

This blog post while focused on the Digital Humanities can be applied to many other disciplines that traditionally did not engage with computers. Well, there are always exceptions, but the use of information technology, communications, and computing were not pervasive.

 

I remember way back when the Macintosh first came out. I was supporting academic computing for the University of North Carolina System which included the contract for microcomputers. I have a Masters of Fine Arts and so when I planned a visit to one campus I called the Dean of the School of the Arts. I explained I'd like to show her this new computer that supported drawing, typography, and foreign language much better than anything else we had. A new first for the Arts. She wasn't interested. She said that the only computer she needed was between her ears, a pencil in her hand for output, and paper to draw on. Times have changed. A sub-text of this tale is that Technology continues to change for better and sometimes worse. It is important to keep an open mind. It is also important to listen to both sides of discussions about the applications and their value. At the moment I feel deja vu with Cloud Computing and the olde days of Mainframes in glass rooms. What would you do if you couldn't access all the Google apps and services for a week or a month? Some say no problem, others would suffer.

 

As the author of the blog says about a digital humanities mission statement, "to remain aware of the uncertain, varied, unruly terrain of human existence even as that existence gets represented in digital form." Keep your eyes open, look for opportunities, and watch your back. Thanks to @verbagetruck for the reminder.

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Marshall McLuhan's Four Innovation Fundamentals | Big Think Edge | Big Think

Marshall McLuhan's Four Innovation Fundamentals | Big Think Edge | Big Think | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Marshall McLuhan, the outlandish visionary of 60s and 70s who predicted the World Wide Web, created a blueprint for innovation in the digital age.

... McLuhan's underlying ideas on innovation are a powerful blueprint for innovation in the digital age. McLuhan identified four attributes of innovation in his book Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, and DeGraff has supplied contemporary examples to illustrate them.

 

This lesson is derived from Big Think Edge, an online learning platform designed to help employees help their companies cultivate the new skills and knowledge necessary to invent new products, new markets, new business models, and new industries.

 

INNOVATION HAS FOUR ATTRIBUTES:
   1. Innovation has to enhance something
   ...
   2. Innovation needs to destroy something old
   ...
   3. An innovation returns us to something that we feel we’ve lost
   ...
   4. Innovation over time becomes anti-innovation"
-- from source: http://bigthink.com/big-think-edge/

 

#McLuhan #Innovation #media #innovation-cycle

ghbrett's insight:

Please note that Daniel Honan has expanded more on the Four Attributes. Plus there are links to other resources.

 

This is the first time that I have read insights to McLuhan's work that has made sense to me and explained some of the difficulties with McLuhan work from the books mentioned. The four attributes and explanation are useful when considering adopting new or emerging resources or technology. It reminds me of people who follow the notion of if I purchase X then I have to remove a similar item at home or else I will be overwhelmed with clutter (information?).

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