Distance Ed Archive
Follow
Find tag "digital"
2.5K views | +3 today
Distance Ed Archive
Topics related to distance eLearning in academia and other organizations
Curated by ghbrett
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by ghbrett from Open Research & Learning
Scoop.it!

"Open Access" By Peter Suber

"Open Access" By Peter Suber | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Open Access - By Peter Suber 

 

NOW AVAILABLE IN MULTIPLE OPEN ACCESS FORMATS

 

... The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work “open access”: digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue.

 

In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn’t, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber’s influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers."

-- from source: https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/open-access

ghbrett's insight:

Peter Suber has been a driving force in the rapidly growing area(s) of Open Access. Rather than cite this or that have a look at his info at Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Suber  Here is a wonderful resource for anyone who uses Internet resources. Get a copy for a eBook-Reader, a computer, or your Boss, but don't forget yourself. Then Read it and then keep as a handy reference resource.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

Bloom's Taxonomy & Visual Knowledge Management: Applying Knowledge in Teams (Part 3)

"Published on Jan 10, 2013: This third video in the series, uses the cognitive "slice" of Bloom's Taxonomy to audit the digital and analog tools our organization uses to apply knowledge as a team.
Category: Education"
from source: http://youtu.be/6rDLzktQ13E

ghbrett's insight:

This is the third video of the trilogy of Cognition from Bloom's Taxonomy by Peter Durand. In this one focuses on the topics of Apply, Evaluate, and Create. Durand describes how the team works through each with different analog and digital tools. He does this in a clear and visual manner that does a great job of explaining the relationship of the tools to the processes as he did in each of the prior two tutorial videos. This series is worth the time to watch for any developer or project manager who has access to the Internet and the tools Durand mentions. Thank you Peter!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

Bloom's Taxonomy & Knowledge Management Tools (Part 1)

"Published on Jan 8, 2013: I don't know about you, but I have a hard time remembering stuff.

 

Thank goodness there are a billion-and-a-half books, apps, tools and methods for "helping" me. Here are my top 3 digital tools and top 3 physical tools for remembering stuff.

 

In this first video of a series, I break apart one of the most fundamental models of the education world: Bloom's Taxonomy.

 

>Peter Durand, Founder & CEO
>Alphachimp University
> http://www.AlphachimpU.com"

 

from source: http://youtu.be/-xPFCqw2_a4

ghbrett's insight:

A nine minute video that simply addresses a section of Bloom's Taxonomy: Cognition. It includes a explanation of a mnemonic model. Also, he shares 3 analog tools and 3 digital tools that he uses to assist with remembering the information he has to work with.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ghbrett from Education Tech & Tools
Scoop.it!

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Many emails now being created, and thus potentially archived by libraries, are the contemporary equivalent not of paper letters, but of phone calls - which, with few exceptions, were unrecorded, and really were lost to history. 

 

... In terms of digital literary archives, one of the lessons for today's archivists is that so-called e-manuscripts are highly unstable, and need early curatorial intervention to secure them against the threats of technological obsolescence. This means that the writers involved become increasingly aware of interest in their papers, and for novelist Jonathan Franzen, this changes everything: 'Unfortunately, I think that once writers become self-conscious about preserving archival material, the game is over...I also don't see how you resist the temptation to select material that suggests the most flattering narratives. And not just select, but actively create!' ..." - from the Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

ghbrett's insight:

his post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

more...
ghbrett's curator insight, January 13, 2013 8:12 AM

This post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

 

Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

5 Characteristics Of Global Learning

5 Characteristics Of Global Learning | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"This post is more about the characteristics of that kind of approach to learning. As globalization becomes more and more inevitable, understanding where we’re drifting might help us make adjustments as we go, yes? The characteristics are numerous and we could almost start anywhere, but five broad characteristics appear below.
1. Local –> Global pattern
2. Self-Directed
3. Iterative & Spiraled
4. Social & Digital
5. Drive By New Actuators"
from source:http://www.teachthought.com/

ghbrett's insight:

While this post is brief, the points are well made. Another thought is "Global" as I understand it here is trans-national, that is, it is crossing international boundaries. I think that Organizations and Agencies that deal with non-traditional students, staff or employees world wide should consider these five elements as well.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

Bloom's Taxonomy & Visual Knowledge Management: Working in Teams (Part 2)

"Published on Jan 10, 2013: Part 2 in a series, this video is a description of the analog and digital tools we use at Alphachimp for visual management of knowledge as we work on projects in teams."

from source:  http://youtu.be/aSd2u7HK8II

ghbrett's insight:

In this presentation Peter Durand expands on the Cognition aspect and how it transitions from a personal system into a team based system for management processes and information about projects. This includes the pre-cursor elements as well as the management of projects. Again he describes analog tools as well as digital tools. These are set in the context of the "team" and the roles the "individual" plays as a member of the team working on a project.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ghbrett from Game-based Lifelong Learning
Scoop.it!

The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now

The 7 Most Powerful Ideas In Learning Available Right Now | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"These aren’t single tools to “try,” but news ways to think about how learners access media, how educators define success, and what the roles of immense digital communities should be in popularizing new learning models." from: source: http://www.teachthought.com/


Via Ariana Amorim, Barbara Truman
more...
Barbara Truman's curator insight, February 28, 2013 8:12 AM

Many of these principles apply to cross-generational learning that can take place all the time, everywhere if we figure out how to make it so. 

ghbrett's curator insight, February 28, 2013 9:21 AM

This is a good article about shifts from traditional modes of learning and training to come in line with emerging trends in teaching and training. It presents a wholistic concept for how a teacher can combine analog and digital processes and concetps to ensure successful experiences for the learner.

Rescooped by ghbrett from Αναλυτικά Προγράμματα και Διδακτικός Σχεδιασμός
Scoop.it!

35 Digital Tools That Work With Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic

35 Digital Tools That Work With Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
Bloom's Taxonomy and digital tools creates an innovative learning environment where students are engaged in their assignments.

Via Sarantis Chelmis
more...
No comment yet.