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The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion

The Future of News Is Not About Facts: It's About Context, Relevance and Opinion | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"News sources can't just give us the facts. They must tell us what those facts mean."


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, February 24, 4:55 PM



Here's a refreshing look at the future of news that highlights the importance of going deeper into creating value for readers by providing more focus, relevance, context and opinion.

These are the characters that properly define what we now refer to as "curation" when it comes to content and news.


The following passages, extracted from the book, The News: A User's Manual, are by Alain de Botton, and have been excerpted from a lengthy article on The Week entitled "The Future of News".


"News organizations are coy about admitting that what they present us with each day are minuscule extracts of narratives whose true shape and logic can generally only emerge from a perspective of months or even years — and that it would hence often be wiser to hear the story in chapters rather than snatched sentences.


They [news organizations] are institutionally committed to implying that it is inevitably better to have a shaky and partial grasp of a subject this minute than to wait for a more secure and comprehensive understanding somewhere down the line.


...


We need news organizations to help our curiosity by signaling how their stories fit into the larger themes on which a sincere capacity for interest depends.


To grow interested in any piece of information, we need somewhere to "put" it, which means some way of connecting it to an issue we already know how to care about.


A section of the human brain might be pictured as a library in which information is shelved under certain fundamental categories. Most of what we hear about day to day easily signals where in the stacks it should go and gets immediately and unconsciously filed.


... the stranger or the smaller stories become, the harder the shelving process grows. What we colloquially call "feeling bored" is just the mind, acting out of a self-preserving reflex, ejecting information it has despaired of knowing where to place.


...We might need help in transporting such orphaned pieces of information to the stacks that would most appropriately reveal their logic.


...it is news organizations to take on some of this librarian's work. It is for them to give us a sense of the larger headings under which minor incidents belong."

 


The call for understanding how much greater value can be provided by curating news and information in depth, rather than by following the shallow, buzzy and viral path beaten by HuffPo, Buzzfeed and the rest of the gang, is clear.


But beyond context and depth, real value can only be added if we accept the fact that going beyond the classic "objective fact reporting", by adding opinion and bias in a transparent fashion, can actually provide greater value in many ways, as Alain de Botton clearly explains:


"Unfortunately for our levels of engagement, there is a prejudice at large within many news organizations that the most prestigious aspect of journalism is the dispassionate and neutral presentation of "facts."


...


The problem with facts is that there is nowadays no shortage of sound examples. The issue is not that we need more of them, but that we don't know what to do with the ones we have...


...But what do these things actually mean? How are they related to the central questions of political life? What can they help us to understand?


...The opposite of facts is bias. In serious journalistic quarters, bias has a very bad name. It is synonymous with malevolent agendas, lies, and authoritarian attempts to deny audiences the freedom to make up their own minds.


Yet we should perhaps be more generous toward bias.


In its pure form, a bias simply indicates a method of evaluating events that is guided by a coherent underlying thesis about human functioning and flourishing.


It is a pair of lenses that slide over reality and aim to bring it more clearly into focus.


Bias strives to explain what events mean and introduces a scale of values by which to judge ideas and events. It seems excessive to try to escape from bias per se; the task is rather to find ways to alight on its more reliable and fruitful examples. 


There are countless worthy lenses to slide between ourselves and the world." 


Overall, these ideas offer a truly refreshing look at the future of news and at the relevance that context and opinion could play in transforming this medium from a vehicle of mass distraction to one of focused learning and understanding for those interested. 



Must read. Rightful. Insightful. 9/10



Full article: http://theweek.com/article/index/256737/the-future-of-news 


Reading time: 10':20"






Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 25, 2:36 PM

El futuro de las Noticias no es sobre los Hechos, sino sobre contexto, relevancia y opinión.

Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 3, 5:12 AM

 Intéressant 

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Curate Your Own Wiki-Guide with the Wikipedia Book Create Tool

Help:Books - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There are almost no limits when creating books from Wikipedia content. A good book focuses on a certain topic and covers it as well as possible. A meaningful title helps other users to have the correct expectation regarding the content of a book.


Via Robin Good
ghbrett's insight:

See Robon's comments below for an in depth analysis. Thank you Robin

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Angela Watkins's curator insight, January 24, 11:34 PM

Curate Your Own Wiki-Guide with the Wikipedia Book Create Tool | @scoopit via @k3hamilton http://sco.lt/...

 

http://angelawatkins57.blogspot.com -

http://pinterest.com/angeladwatkins

Bettina Ascaino's curator insight, January 25, 7:16 AM

Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Few people know that it is actually possible to curate Wikipedia content into custom print books or PDF / OpenDocument ebooks that contain exactly the content you want in the order you specify.

 

Once you are logged into Wikipedia you simply activate the Book Creator Tool and then, from that moment on, everytime you visit a Wikipedia page you can click and add it to your curated Wiki-Book.

 

There is also a dedicated wiki page where you can manage the pages you have collected and you can reorganized and sort them any way you want, eliminating the pages you don't need.

 

Unfortunately there is no integrated way to edit and further customize the content of those pages for your own use.

 

PDF versions are freely downloadable by anyone, print book versions are paid.

 

N.B.: The price for print books depends on the number of pages, starting with US$ 7.90 for books up to 100 pages. 10% of the gross sales price goes to the Wikimedia Foundation. Books are perfect bound, printed in the dimensions 8.5 inch x 5.5 inch (216 mm x 140 mm) and contain a table of contents, your chapters and articles, licensing information next to an index.

 

More info about printed versions: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Books/Frequently_Asked_Questions ;

 

Free to use.

 

Learn everything about it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Books ;

 

Video tutorial: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/91/Enwp_screencast4.theora.ogv ;

 

 

MCLibrarianRMIT's curator insight, January 27, 10:04 PM

It's worth keeping in mind that some 'publishers' try to sell books based entirely on Wikipedia content. 

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Content Curation for Learning and Development: What People Think [Video]

 

 


Via Robin Good
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Rudi Permana's curator insight, September 29, 2013 11:14 AM

I started to enjoy this new activity

Begoña Iturgaitz's comment, September 29, 2013 5:43 PM
many thanks!!!
Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, September 29, 2013 5:52 PM

Nora goaz? 

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Curate, Organize and Visualize Large Data Collections with TreeMap

Curate, Organize and Visualize Large Data Collections with TreeMap | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"TreeMap provides an easy, yet extremely powerful means of creating beautiful treemaps for analytical and presentation purpose. Importing data from a wide variety of file formats (including of course Excel), as well as connecting to databases (such as MySQL and SQL Server) is a breeze... and it scales to big data." from source: http://www.treemap.com/


Via Robin Good, ghbrett
ghbrett's insight:

This is another post where I recommend that you scroll down to have a look at Robin Good's great commentary. I can not beat his for details. His Scoop.it site is: http://curation.masternewmedia.org/  Thanks Robin!

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ghbrett's curator insight, July 18, 2013 9:07 AM

This is another post where I recommend that you scroll down to have a look at Robin Good's great commentary. I can not beat his for details. His Scoop.it site is: http://curation.masternewmedia.org/  Thanks Robin!

Jenifer Rettler's curator insight, July 18, 2013 10:15 AM

If you are looking for additional visualization tools for displaying data, TreeMap v. 3.0 offers a classic tree map layout as well as others, like squarified variant, circular, tag cloud and voronoi.

malek's curator insight, July 18, 2013 4:54 PM

Interesting tool, give it a try

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Beyond Collecting and Sharing: Twitter as a Curation Tool

Beyond Collecting and Sharing: Twitter as a Curation Tool | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

 

 


Via Robin Good
ghbrett's insight:

See Robin Goode's comments below! Excellent.

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Andreas Kuswara's comment, June 11, 2013 9:22 PM
I supposed twitter can be used or any tool can be used for anything,but some tools are made with certain intended affordance by the creator that would make the tool less effective for certain functions. curation in a way is capturing things void of time (i probably drawing too much from museum), while twitter is fast pace timeline of interactive (or one way) discourse.... they seems to be inherently different.

i'm just automatically sceptical when 'one tool can be use for all' theme appear. but it is an interesting suggestion.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, June 11, 2013 9:33 PM
Many people learn one tool and then move on to others. I like to analyze each and use the best features of that particular 2.0 project. I use twitter as a push tool to share info for the most part.
Ali Anani's curator insight, June 29, 2013 12:18 AM
The right way to write
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Curation, Sharing, Transparency and Failure: How We Can Learn by Sharing Our Process

Curation, Sharing, Transparency and Failure: How We Can Learn by Sharing Our Process | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

We've heard the argument that everyone's a curator online by means of blogging and reblogging, but what about the professional curators who are responsible for producing major physical exhibitions ...


Via Robin Good
ghbrett's insight:

Check out Robin's comments below. Once again, Thank You Robin for a great review

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Emily at Two Pens's curator insight, March 13, 2013 2:01 PM

What happens when art curators use Tumblr as their exhibition space.

Michael John Freestone's curator insight, March 25, 2013 11:29 PM

www.mjfgroup.biz

Crystina Castiglione's curator insight, March 30, 2013 11:29 PM
This article really brought to light what being globally connected can do for not just artists, but curators as well and how it can be used to create an entirely new type of exhibition. It also describes a new age of art that infuses the way we use technology, especially within social media networks.
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Why Curation Will Transform Education and Learning: 10 Key Reasons

Why Curation Will Transform Education and Learning: 10 Key Reasons | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"This article, builds up over my recent presentation on Content Curation for Education that I delivered at Emerge2012 virtual conference.

In that presentation I claimed that the adoption of "curation approaches" will directly affect the way competences are taught, how textbooks are put together, how students are going to learn about a subject, and more than anything, the value that can be generated for "others" through a personal learning path.

If we learn not by memorizing facts, but by collaborating with others in the creation of a meaningful collection-explanations of specific topics/issues/events then, for the first time in history, we can enrich planetary knowledge each time we take on a new learning task." -- from source: http://www.masternewmedia.org/
ghbrett's insight:

As we produce more content and multimedia, who is going to clean up after us? Since we have endless storage on site and in many "clouds," there is less need to prune or delete data than ever before. This reviewer remembers having a disk with 26KB storage which needed to be used attentively. This article is one of the better of the emerging topic and related processes of Curating our stuff. Often the metaphor of one's Digital Footprints is raised as a way of describing all the different services, systems, machines, archives, etc., etc. that our stuff is. Oh, and then there are the other pack rats who have copied our stuff and put it into their stashes. Folks, it's time to take a moment to reflect on what we are doing with content, media, and stuff. Then curate by pruning, updating, aggregating, and other such digital stewardship. Finally, as my Father always said, "Don't do as I do, please do what I say." (grin)

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 18, 2012 7:02 PM

As we produce more content and multimedia, who is going to clean up after us? Since we have endless storage on site and in many "clouds," there is less need to prune or delete data than ever before. This reviewer remembers having a disk with 26KB storage which needed to be used attentively. This article is one of the better of the emerging topic and related processes of Curating our stuff. Often the metaphor of one's Digital Footprints is raised as a way of describing all the different services, systems, machines, archives, etc., etc. that our stuff is. Oh, and then there are the other pack rats who have copied our stuff and put it into their stashes. Folks, it's time to take a moment to reflect on what we are doing with content, media, and stuff. Then curate by pruning, updating, aggregating, and other such digital stewardship. Finally, as my Father always said, "Don't do as I do, please do what I say." (grin)

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A 1945 Essay on Information Overload, “Curation,” and Open-Access Science

A 1945 Essay on Information Overload, “Curation,” and Open-Access Science | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"From www.brainpickings.org - November 27, 1:04 PM
There is a new profession of trail blazers, those who find delight in the task of establishing useful trails through the enormous mass of the common record."

 

More from article: "Marveling at the rapid rate of technological progress, which has made possible the increasingly cheap production of increasingly reliable machines, Bush makes an enormously important — and timely — point about the difference between merely compressing information to store it efficiently and actually making use of it in the way of gleaning knowledge. (This, bear in mind, despite the fact that 90% of data in the world today was created in the last two years.)" from source: http://www.brainpickings.org/

 

NOTE: This is an example of a timeless piece of writing and thought that keeps on being relevant to our advances in information and the technology we use to collect and disseminate it.


Via Marc Rougier
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teoportal's curator insight, December 19, 2012 11:49 AM

Tu vivienda esta aquí (pisos, apartamentos, chalets, villas, casas, adosados, locales, estudios, etc .....o promoción de obra nueva) nunca fue tan fácil en comprar tu vivienda, nosotros les ofrecemos una gestión personalizada en compra de tu vivienda, pide mas información sin compromiso.

Lisa Labon's curator insight, January 28, 2013 9:52 AM

Mind boggling to think what that the overload of content he speaks of is now created in a single day, every day.

garassini's curator insight, March 11, 2013 6:51 AM

Applicare il metodo delle associazioni mentali all'archiviazione e alla ricerca delle informazioni. La visione profetica di Vannevar Bush.

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Collect and Organize Live Web Content Snippets Into Dynamic Collections with Wepware

Collect and Organize Live Web Content Snippets Into Dynamic Collections with Wepware | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Louise Quo Vadis's curator insight, February 24, 1:09 PM

I like this a lot, but it is only good for the Chrome browser. Check it out.

wanderingsalsero's curator insight, February 25, 5:09 AM

I can see where this could be very useful to a business owner wanting to aggregate content for his/her customers.

Nine0Media's curator insight, February 25, 9:30 PM

Great for #ContentCuration #WebConsultants 

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Content Curation and Preservation: How To Archive Digital Documents Reliably

Content Curation and Preservation: How To Archive Digital Documents Reliably | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
ghbrett's insight:

Be sure to check out Robin Good's comments below.

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, October 29, 2013 1:38 PM

A useful guide to the art of digital archiving.

Darryl Barnaby's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:05 AM

Guidance on how to best preserve media.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, November 2, 2013 8:38 PM

Interesting post about archieving digital documents in a realiable way

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The Value of List-Making: Three Traits To Make Yours Stand Out From The Rest

The Value of List-Making: Three Traits To Make Yours Stand Out From The Rest | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, September 28, 2013 7:10 AM


Beth Kanter, one of the key go-to-person for communication strategy when it comes to NGOs, provides a useful reminder of the value of creating lists for content marketing objectives alongside some good links to list-making examples and list-building tools. 



My comment: One thing that differentiates good "lists" from bad ones, is not often visibile by looking just at the surface.


Good lists in my view are characterized by these three traits: 


1) Short - long lists are tiring and not very useful


2) Categorized - "groups" help scanning and finding what you're looking for


3) Commented - excerpts from about pages as list item descriptions are not very useful, as what makes a real difference in a list is your insight, opinion or evaluation into why that item is in that list. 


Without these elements in fact, just about anyone can take a search tool and assemble the "Best of" whatever software category in a ridicule amount of time, while not really providing anything useful or reliable. 


That's the difference between a list and a curated list.


The list "as is" makes you work more to check and verify everything that's in the list, while the curated one saves you time in finding or reminding you rapidly what is exactly that you need.



Useful. Resourceful. 7/10



Original post: http://www.bethkanter.org/lists/ 






Prof. Hankell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:27 AM

Robin Good's insight:

Beth Kanter, one of the key go-to-person for communication strategy when it comes to NGOs, provides a useful reminder of the value of creating lists for content marketing objectives alongside some good links to list-making examples and list-building tools.


My comment: One thing that differentiates good "lists" from bad ones, is not often visibile by looking just at the surface.

Good lists in my view are characterized by these three traits:

1) Short - long lists are tiring and not very useful

2) Categorized - "groups" help scanning and finding what you're looking for

3) Commented - excerpts from about pages as list item descriptions are not very useful, as what makes a real difference in a list is your insight, opinion or evaluation into why that item is in that list.

Without these elements in fact, just about anyone can take a search tool and assemble the "Best of" whatever software category in a ridicule amount of time, while not really providing anything useful or reliable.

That's the difference between a list and a curated list.

The list "as is" makes you work more to check and verify everything that's in the list, while the curated one saves you time in finding or reminding you rapidly what is exactly that you need.

Beth Kanter's comment, September 28, 2013 12:47 PM
Thanks for adding your valuable insights that lead to improved curation practice.
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Future Trends in Technology and Education

Future Trends in Technology and Education | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Future Trends in Technology and Education is a monthly report. It surveys recent developments in how education is changing, primarily under the impact of digital technologies. Its purpose is to help educators, policy-makers, and the public think about the future of teaching, learning, research, and institutions.

 

Every month FTTE aggregates recent developments, checking them against previously-identified trendlines. As certain trends build in support and significance, the report recommends watching them for future impact. FTTE also notes trends which appear to be declining in significance."

-- from source: http://bryanalexander.org/

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ghbrett's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:53 PM

Bryan Alexander is not only one of the leading Thought Leaders of Technology for Education, Training, and Research; he is one of the most scholarly, well grounded, sharing people I know. His work is based on fact with a dab of opinion from others as well as himself. His eyes, ears, and haptic senses are sensitive to opportunities and trends. Bryan's voice asks the difficult but important questions. Then his synthesis of this input is shared openly with us. He is an essential part of the future. That is why you should quickly take advantage of his offer to share his new monthly report "Future Trends in Technology and Education."

Howard Rheingold's comment, June 18, 2013 3:58 PM
I agree with George. Follow this if you are interested in the topic.
ghbrett's comment, June 18, 2013 4:01 PM
Thanks Howard!
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The News Are Just an Option: Curating Archives Is a Better Strategy For Creating Outstanding New Work

The News Are Just an Option: Curating Archives Is a Better Strategy For Creating Outstanding New Work | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's comment, April 8, 2013 5:40 PM
Excellent feedback and comments Karen and Beth. Thanks to both of you for sharing your preferences.
Ken Morrison's comment, April 14, 2013 6:27 PM
HI Robin, Just a quick note to say thanks for another year of your great curation. I see your posts often, but today is the first time I noticed the 'extra touch' of your customized background with your photo and name. Smart use of the customized background.
Robin Good's comment, April 15, 2013 12:46 AM
Thank you Ken, much appreciated.
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'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Many emails now being created, and thus potentially archived by libraries, are the contemporary equivalent not of paper letters, but of phone calls - which, with few exceptions, were unrecorded, and really were lost to history. 

 

... In terms of digital literary archives, one of the lessons for today's archivists is that so-called e-manuscripts are highly unstable, and need early curatorial intervention to secure them against the threats of technological obsolescence. This means that the writers involved become increasingly aware of interest in their papers, and for novelist Jonathan Franzen, this changes everything: 'Unfortunately, I think that once writers become self-conscious about preserving archival material, the game is over...I also don't see how you resist the temptation to select material that suggests the most flattering narratives. And not just select, but actively create!' ..." - from the Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

ghbrett's insight:

his post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

more...
ghbrett's curator insight, January 13, 2013 8:12 AM

This post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

 

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The Human Algorithm: Redefining the Value of Data - Brian Solis

The Human Algorithm: Redefining the Value of Data - Brian Solis | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"... The human algorithm is part understanding and part communication. The ability to communicate and apply insights internally and externally is the key to unlocking opportunities to earn relevance. Beyond research, beyond intelligence, the human algorithm is a function of extracting insights with intention, humanizing trends ad possibilities and working with strategists to improve and innovate everything from processes to products to overall experiences.

The idea of the human algorithm is to serve as the human counterpart to the abundance of new social intelligence and listening platforms hitting the market every day. Someone has to be on the other side of data to interpret it beyond routine. Someone has to redefine the typical buckets where data is poured. And someone has to redefine the value of data to save important findings from a slow and eventual death by three-ring binders rich with direction and meaning."
- from the source: http://www.briansolis.com
ghbrett's insight:

NOTE: This article is in parallel with the increasing number of citations about the need and development of curation in the digital environment by people. This means that while computers can gather, mine, sort, and roughly analyze Big Data, there still is a need for a human interface / filter. These people are necessary not only for research or corporate environments, but also libraries, instructional design, and assessment analytics of eLearning ecosystems.

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 14, 2012 11:26 AM

NOTE: This article is in parallel with the increasing number of citations about the need and development of curation in the digital environment by people. This means that while computers can gather, mine, sort, and roughly analyze Big Data, there still is a need for a human interface / filter. These people are necessary not only for research or corporate environments, but also libraries, instructional design, and assessment analytics of eLearning ecosystems.