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MOOC Verses DOCC | Open Research & Learning

MOOC Verses DOCC | Open Research & Learning | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

'It was only a matter of time before massive open online courses (MOOC) were challenged to see online learning in a new light. Distributed Open Collaborative Course (DOCC) has a different approach to how students should learn through online education and the role of the instructor. Where MOOCs facilitated the traditional sense of teaching, having one instructor who values the topic they teach. DOCC has expanded this idea to include many instructors, experts, and guest lecturers from various regions to teach the students.

 

The belief for DOCC is that it takes more than one instructor on a subject for students to truly learn a topic. DOCC focuses on interaction between students, teachers, and peers to expand on their topic, while learning from one another is the vital component. Anne Balsamo, dean of the School of Media Studies at The New School and co-facilitator of the DOCC, said “who you learn with is as important as what you learn. Learning is a relationship, not just something that can be measured by outcomes or formal metrics.”" - From /source - http://proctorfree.com/mooc-verses-dooc

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Three Kinds of MOOCs « Lisa's (Online) Teaching Blog

"We are so into MOOCs now that it’s too much for me. Gotta apply Ockham’s Razor 2.0 to this stuff.

 

At the Ed-Media conference, I attended a session by Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. In her discussion of Troubleshooting MOOCs, she noted the dificulties in determining her own direction in offering a MOOC in the “Stanford model” MOOCs versus the “connectivism” MOOCs. I found myself breaking it down into three categories instead. 


Each type of MOOC has all three elements (networks, tasks and content), but each has a goal that is dominant.

 

Network-based MOOCs are the original MOOCs, taught by Alec Couros, George Siemens, Stephen Downes, Dave Cormier. The goal is not so much content and skills acquisition, but conversation, socially constructed knowledge, and exposure to the milieu of learning on the open web using distributed means. The pedagogy of network-based MOOCs is based in connectivist or connectivist-style methods. Resources are provided, but exploration is more important than any particular content. Traditional assessment is difficult.

 

Task-based MOOCs emphasize skills in the sense that they ask the learner to complete certain types of work. In Jim Groom’s ds106 at UMW, the learning is distributed and the formats variable. There are many options for completing each assignment, but a certain number and variety of assignments need to be done to perform the skills. Similarly, our POT Certificate Class focuses on different topics for each week, and skills are demonstrated through sections on design, audio, video etc. in an effort to expose learners to many different formats and styles in online teaching. Community is crucial, particularly for examples and assistance, but it is a secondary goal. Pedagogy of task-based MOOCs tend to be a mix of instructivism and constructivism. Traditional assessment is difficult here too.

 

Content-based MOOCs are the ones with huge enrollments, commercial prospects, big university professors, automated testing, and exposure in the popular press. Community is difficult but may be highly significant to the participants, or one can go it alone. Content acquisition is more important in these classes than either networking or task completion, and they tend to use instructivist pedagogy. Traditional assessment, both formative and summative, may be emphasized. Mass participation seems to imply mass processing." from source: http://lisahistory.net/

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ghbrett's curator insight, May 6, 2013 9:34 AM

Good post, points to SideShare post bye Sarah Schrire of Kibbutzim College of Education in Tel Aviv. ( http://slidesha.re/11NFMs9 ). Apparently the notion of MOOCs as a fad is settling down. Now educators, trainers, and others are beginning to better understand the development, content, design, and processes involved in running a MOOC. Also, there is a growing paradox in this space, the term "Open" occasionally does not imply free. I can imagine that there will be emerging pricing schedules from free to various fees set by the MOOC publishers.

Difundi's curator insight, June 13, 2014 5:41 PM

Explicación simple y clara de los tipos de MOOC: Network-based, Task-based, Content-based.

 

El modelo que sigue Difundi es el en el que se basa OpenMOOC, software en el que se basa y que fundamentalmente se encuadra en el tercer tipo (Content-based) pero, que puede tener fuerte componente del primer tipo (Network-based) si se hace uso de servicios externos en la nube, como son blogs, redes, documentos colaborativos, etc.

 

La calidad de los contenidos y la dinamización de un MOOC son elementos clave y depende de ello, que la tasa de terminación sea alta. Si la dimensión Network-based de un MOOC es mayor, más y mejor dinamización necesitará.

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The MOOC Model: Challenging Traditional Education (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

The MOOC Model: Challenging Traditional Education (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
EDUCAUSE Review Online

 

"Key Takeaways
> A turning point will occur in the higher education model when a MOOC-based program of study leads to a degree from an accredited institution — a trend that has already begun to develop.
> Addressing the quality of the learning experience that MOOCs provide is therefore of paramount importance to their credibility and acceptance.
> MOOCs represent a postindustrial model of teaching and learning that has the potential to undermine and replace the business model of institutions that depend on recruiting and retaining students for location-bound, proprietary forms of campus-based learning." from source: http://www.educause.edu

ghbrett's insight:

MOOCs are controversial when it comes to the business and accreditation aspects of higher education. The value of a degree versus a credential or badge is in debate. How can a remotely controlled educational experience be credible or of quality? Finally, if they are accepted, adopted, and integrated into mainstream academia, what will this mean financially for higher education institutions.

 

On the other hand, in corporate training circles the challenge of MOOCs may be that the content presented may present content or pedagogy that conflicts with the corporate culture. This applies to government agencies as well as commercial organizations.  

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Free Online Open Courses - OEDB.org

Free Online Open Courses - OEDB.org | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Get free online courses from the world's leading universities at the Open Education Database. This collection includes over 2850 free courses in the liberal arts and sciences. Download these audio & video courses straight to your computer or mp3 player." from source: http://oedb.org/open/

ghbrett's insight:

The Open Courses listed on this page include Arts, Education, Liberal Arts, Medicine, Business, Engineering & Computers, Math, Science. In addition to Open Courses already listed, the top navigation bar other topics include Online Colleges, Online Degree Programs, and Library. Currently there are 1166 Full Courses, 423 Video lectures, 214 Audio Lectures, 453 Text Articles, and 577 Mixed Media offerings. Looks like The Open Education Data Base is worth checking out.

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Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral

Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"I (Howard Rheingold) also discovered, through a co-learner in a Rheingold U class, about "Paragogy" -- the nascent theory of peer to peer pedagogy. The co-learner, Charles Danoff, wrote a paper about it with Joseph Corneli: Paragogy: Synthesizing Individual and Organizational Learning. Searching on the word "paragogy" reveals more resources -- but not so many that they can't be surveyed quickly. The field is just beginning to grow.

I've been invited to deliver the 2011 Regents' Lecture at University of California, Berkeley. I intend to expand the paragogy universe by instigating a peer-created guide to pure peer-to-peer learning. I'm calling it "peeragogy." While "paragogy" is more etymologically correct, "peeragogy" is self-explanatory. In my lecture, I'll explain the evolution of my own pedagogy and reveal some of what I've discovered in the world of online self-organized learning. Then I will invite volunteers to join me in a two week hybrid of face-to-face seminars and online discussion. Can we self-organize our research, discover, summarize, and prioritize what is known through theory and practice, then propose, argue, and share a tentative resource guide for peeragogical groups? In theory, those who use our guide to pursue their own explorations can edit the guide to reflect new learning.

It's not exactly a matter of making my own role of teacher obsolete. If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning." http://dmlcentral.net/
ghbrett's insight:

Recently there has been great interest in massive open online courses (MOOCs) as collaborative online learning experiences. This reviewer has been hearing, reading, listening, and talking about collaboration for education, training, and research for a couple decades now. Moving beyond the MOOC concept, Howard's article is a thoughtful piece on his and other's view of peeragogy. It contemplates the where and the how "peeragogy" will be a convergence of collaboration, self-learning, organized learning, MOOCs and other online collaborative resources. There is great potential here for advances in how to use technology. This will happen in a way that improves communication between and among students, teachers, and others.  Plus "peeragogy" will engage people to become participants in these processes rather than silent observers.

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Helen Teague's curator insight, May 1, 2015 8:57 AM

Howard Rheingold-- co-learners, Paragogy

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Syrian Internet Connections Cut for Second Day

Syrian Internet Connections Cut for Second Day | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"BEIRUT, Lebanon — Activists in Syria reported on Friday that Internet connections were cut for a second successive day, fanning speculation among opponents of President Bashar al-Assad about the government’s intentions in coming days." from the source: http://www.nytimes.com/

 

NOTE: This is another example of recent national internet shutdowns. A reason I worry about Cloud Services like Google, SAAP, MOOCs, Amazons3, Apple iCloud, DropBox, etc., etc. Whether malicious intent, government intervention, or acts of technology or God.

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Welcome to Openness in Education - a MOOC course

Welcome to Openness in Education - a MOOC course | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Openness in Education is a credited course in Athabasca University's (AU) Master of Education in DE. Information on AU and its accreditation is available here. This version of the course is delivered as an open online course - free for anyone to join." from the source: http://open.mooc.ca/

 

NOTE: Here's a course about Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). If you have been curious or wanted to know more about the topic you should sign up.

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Students in Free Online Courses Form Groups to Study and Socialize - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Students in Free Online Courses Form Groups to Study and Socialize - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"As enrollment has rapidly increased in free online classes, also known as Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOC’s, students are increasingly forming groups, both online and in the real world, to study and socialize.

 

Whether aiming to make the experience more personal or to learn more about the possibilities of free online education, the students are seeking out various ways to connect with classmates." -- from Source

 

NOTE: the article goes on to give a couple well explained descriptions of different ways the groups are formed or used and which technologies they use to create their groups.

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Four Barriers That MOOCs Must Overcome To Build a Sustainable Model - e-Literate

Four Barriers That MOOCs Must Overcome To Build a Sustainable Model - e-Literate | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Given the hype of national media coverage of massive open online courses (MOOCs), it is refreshing to see more recent analysis looking at important attributes such as revenue models, dropout rates, and instructional design." - from source

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Top Universities Test the Online Appeal of Free

Top Universities Test the Online Appeal of Free | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 18, 2012
Source: New York Times
URL:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/18/education/top-universities-test-the-online-appeal-of-free.html?_r=1&ref=technology

Title: Top Universities Test the Online Appeal of Free

Abstract/Quotes:
"A few months ago, free online courses from prestigious universities were a rarity. Now, they are the cause for announcements every few weeks, as a field suddenly studded with big-name colleges and competing software platforms evolves with astonishing speed. ...

Ramin Rahimian for The New York Times, "Online classes have been around for years. What is new is how some top colleges now are throwing open the doors digitally. ...

In a major development on Tuesday, a dozen highly ranked universities said they had signed on with Coursera, a new venture offering free classes online. They still must overcome some skepticism about the quality of online education and the prospects for having the courses cover the costs of producing them, but their enthusiasm is undimmed." -- from the Source

NOTE: This is a follow up on the MOOCs article in New York Times from July 17th with more detail.

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U.Va. Enters Agreement To Distribute Courses Online

U.Va. Enters Agreement To Distribute Courses Online | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 17, 2012
Source: Univ. of Virginia - press release
URL: http://www.virginia.edu/uvatoday/newsRelease.php?id=19116

Title: (MOOCs) University of Virginia Enters Agreement To Distribute Courses Online

Abstract/Quotes:
"U.Va.'s agreement with Coursera, announced today, has been in the works for several months. Both the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences and Darden School of Business have been carefully evaluating options that could result in thousands of students having online access to world-class instruction from U.Va." -- from the Source

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Consortium of Colleges Takes Online Education to New Level

Consortium of Colleges Takes Online Education to New Level | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 17, 2012
Source: New York Times
URL:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/17/education/consortium-of-colleges-takes-online-education-to-new-level.html?src=me&ref=general

Title: Universities Reshaping Education on the Web

Abstract/Quotes:
"As part of a seismic shift in online learning that is reshaping higher education, Coursera, a year-old company founded by two Stanford University computer scientists, will announce on Tuesday that a dozen major research universities are joining the venture. In the fall, Coursera will offer 100 or more free massive open online courses, or MOOCs, that are expected to draw millions of students and adult learners globally.

Even before the expansion, Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng, the founders of Coursera, said it had registered 680,000 students in 43 courses with its original partners, Michigan, Princeton, Stanford and the University of Pennsylvania.

Now, the partners will include the California Institute of Technology; Duke University; the Georgia Institute of Technology; Johns Hopkins University; Rice University; the University of California, San Francisco; the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; the University of Washington; and the University of Virginia, where the debate over online education was cited in last’s month’s ousting — quickly overturned — of its president, Teresa A. Sullivan. Foreign partners include the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, the University of Toronto and EPF Lausanne, a technical university in Switzerland."  -- from the Source

Note:  Coursera is the new "shiny new toy" that every University wants to be part of in some way. By the way, this is one of the issues that caused the UVA President to be fired temporarily. The Board wanted her to join in, but she did not until MOOCs proved some validated value and ROI. You'll notice she has bent to the pressure in the quote above and now UVA is a member of Coursera.

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The corridor of uncertainty: How open is open?

The corridor of uncertainty: How open is open? | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 13, 2012
Source: "The corridor of uncertainty" - personal blog
URL: http://acreelman.blogspot.fr/2012/07/how-open-is-open.html

Title: (MOOCs) How open is open?

Abstract/Quotes:
"The original model is highly collaborative with students aggregating and creating content, discussing and sharing new ideas in a dynamic but sometimes chaotic environment. The notion of the traditional linear course with predefined objectives becomes more fluid with each student participating on their own terms and with individual objectives.

Most of the headline-making MOOCs like EdX are highly traditional in format; online lectures, lesson plans, tests and reading with some kind of certificate of completion at the end (though never "real" university credits). The gap between these two models is so large that we may need to redefine the MOOC or bring in some new acronyms."

NOTE: This is an interesting article that questions some of the basis of MOOCs with citations (links) to other comments from other authors. A good starting point for more challenging comments about the topic of MOOCs.

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Three online class types « Lisa's (Online) Teaching Blog

"A draft of another tripartite idea, this time focused on online classes in general, across the board.

 

The McClass

Run inside an LMS, or even better by Coursera or Udacity, and/or offered by proponents of the mass-produced course (U of Phoenix, Ashford, etc), the McClass features recorded lectures, an unmoderated internal discussion (if any), and grading by graduate students, peers or staff (and soon robo-graders). All xMOOCs are in this category, but so are classes created by teams of instructional designers or course developers and “content experts”, but facilitated (I hesitate to use the word “taught”) by less experienced instructors or program coordinators. Sartorial analogy: one size fits all.

 

The sub sandwich class

It’s a six inch or a twelve — you can change the mix of ingredients inside but the options are standardized. Sub sandwich classes are offered by community colleges and universities dependent on a single Learning Management System, the inherent design of which influences (and may determine) instructor pedagogy. Even built on a whole wheat system like Canvas or an in-house product, the defaults of the LMS are easy to adopt without requiring an examination of ones own pedagogy. Hallmarks include dependence on publisher-produced materials, and an internal, traditional moderated discussion of issues, usually lacking a constructivist focus. Quality varies and is partly dependent on the freshness of the ingredients.

 

The artisanal class

Created by the instructor, the artisanal class includes only those elements that help realize the instructor’s pedagogy. The design is developed based on knowledge and experience as an active, independent teacher. The artisanal class may exist inside an LMS, but when it does the LMS is substantially customized, and often external web elements are brought in to replace built-in features (blogs, wikis, etc). Hallmarks include a foundation in free and open or home-made formats, innovative assessment techniques, and a distinct lack of top-down control. Discussion may be distributed or focused on content creation. Flaws add character and provide opportunity for community creativity. Most cMOOCs fit this model, but so do classes offered by public institutions who allow faculty substantial control over the design and deployment of their work." from source: http://lisahistory.net

ghbrett's insight:

This post offers a differentiation of online courses moving from chaos to small group interaction. As I have noted in an earlier post this week, there is growing assessment of the types of and value of MOOCs. 

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OER-101: Learn the Basics and Benefits of the Open Educational Resource - Faculty eCommons

OER-101: Learn the Basics and Benefits of the Open Educational Resource - Faculty eCommons | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
OER-101 starts with the basics, namely what makes a resource “open” and the benefits of incorporating Open Education into your learning environment, and is split into five modules or “pursuits.”

 

"With the cost of textbooks and tuition on the rise, the necessity of incorporating Open Educational Resources (OERs) into curricula for all ages and all levels of education is undeniable. Do you struggle with finding high-quality OERs on the web or question whether or not certain resources are actually “open?” Would you like to create your own OER but don’t know how to begin or what steps to take?

 

Maybe you are even asking yourself, “What the heck is an OER?”

 

If you find yourself mulling over these questions or simply have an interest in learning more about creating and utilizing OERs, self-enroll in Open SUNY’s new Open Course on CourseSites. The course, “Locating, Creating, Licensing, and Utilizing OERs (OER-101),” is free and provides a wealth of information on OERs for both novice OER users and those already familiar with the world of the Open Educational Resource." from source: http://facultyecommons.com/

ghbrett's insight:

This is an opportunity for faculty to learn about and inform themselves about the basics and benefits of Open Education Resources. It includes a series on online modules as well as other materials.

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Post University - The Evolution of Distance Learning in Higher Education

Post University - The Evolution of Distance Learning in Higher Education | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
Post University - The Evolution of Distance Learning in Higher Education

 

About this infographic:
"Distance learning in the U.S., now often referred to as online education, has evolved tremendously from its humble, early reliance on "snail mail' to its modern delivery system rooted in digital innovations. Its impact on higher education has been more than 120 years in the making, with the pace of development accelerating dramatically in recent years.

 

We should celebrate this vibrant history, and more important, learn from it as we continue to make strides in how we use distance learning and online education to better meet student and employer needs, improve our curricula, and enhance learning.

 

Here's a look at where we started, how far we've come, and what it tells us about the future of distance learning and online education. We also added a few predictions on what's next, and invite your input as well." - from source: http://www.evolution-of-distance-learning.com/

ghbrett's insight:

This is an interactive InfoGraphic that begins with 1892 and moves up to current state of Distance Learning. A worth while read.

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IVMOOC: Information Visualization

IVMOOC: Information Visualization | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

This course provides an overview about the state of the art in information visualization. It teaches the process of producing effective visualizations that take the needs of users into account.


Among other topics, the course covers:
> Data analysis algorithms that enable extraction of patterns and trends in data
> Major temporal, geospatial, topical, and network visualization techniques
> Discussions of systems that drive research and development.

ghbrett's insight:

This course begins next week, but looks to be an interesting overview of Information Visualization and how it can be found and utilized for research, education, and training. It should prove to be worth the time to participate.

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Providers of Free MOOC's Now Charge Employers for Access to Student Data

Providers of Free MOOC's Now Charge Employers for Access to Student Data | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"Providers of free online courses are officially in the headhunting business, bringing in revenue by selling to employers information about high-performing students who might be a good fit for open jobs.

 

On Tuesday, Coursera, which works with high-profile colleges to provide massive open online courses, or MOOC's, announced its employee-matching service, called Coursera Career Services. Some high-profile tech companies have already signed up—including Facebook and Twitter, according to a post on Coursera's blog, though officials would not disclose how much employers pay for the service. Only students who opt into the service will be included in the system that participating employers see, a detail stressed in an e-mail message that Coursera sent to its nearly two million past or present students on Tuesday." -- from the source http://chronicle.com/

NOTE: People always ask about the "business model" of new internet services and applications. Here's a pretty innovative process. Especially in a time where there seem to be job shortages for college graduates or people separating from the US Military.

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Federica Brambilla's curator insight, May 7, 2014 6:58 AM

Coursera Career Service

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Sustainability and MOOCs in Historical Perspective

"Overview of the historical factors leading to the development of massive open online courses, and discussion of what this history can tell us of the sustainability of MOOCs in the future. For audio and video please see http://www.downes.ca/presentation/304" from Slideshare c/o Stephen Downes http://www.downes.ca/

 

NOTE: The slides alone are useful and informative. Stephen Downes has also included a link to the Audio/Video version of this presentation too. This is a thoughtful and well done presentation about distance learning, the emergence of Massive Open Online Courses, and what the future may be.

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MOOC's Take a Major Step Toward College Credit

MOOC's Take a Major Step Toward College Credit | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"The American Council on Education (ACE) has agreed to review a handful of free online courses offered by elite universities and may recommend that other colleges grant credit for them.


The move could lead to a world in which many students graduate from traditional colleges faster by taking self-guided courses on the side, taught free by professors from Stanford University, the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and other well-known colleges." from source http://chronicle.com/

 

NOTE: This article is interesting in that it not only describes the rationale and process that The American Council on Education (ACE) will use to evaluate Coursera a Massive Open Online Course provider, but it also describes other related activities. Among those include funding from the Gates Foundation for similar evaluations. This is a quick and worthwhile read.

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MOOC MOOC: A MOOC on MOOCs

Starting August 12, 2012, Hybrid Pedagogy, an online journal of teaching and technology, will host a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) designed specifically at looking carefully at this new pedagogical approach.
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How an Upstart Company Might Profit From Free Courses - College 2.0 - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Published Date: July 19, 2012
Source: Chronicle for Higher Education
URL: http://chronicle.com/article/How-an-Upstart-Company-Might/133065/

Title: Inside the Coursera Contract: How an Upstart Company Might Profit From Free Courses

Abstract/Quotes:
"Coursera has been operating for only a few months, but the company has already persuaded some of the world's best-known universities to offer free courses through its online platform."

"The contract (with the Univ of Michigan) reveals that even Coursera isn't yet sure how it will bring in revenue." -- from the Source

NOTE: This article begins to explore more in depth the operational aspects of Coursera: it's funding model, who is / are the target clientele, who gets paid royalties, who owns the content, and so on.

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Is Coursera the Beginning of the End for Traditional Higher Education? - Forbes

Is Coursera the Beginning of the End for Traditional Higher Education? - Forbes | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 17, 2012
Source: Forbes - online
URL:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2012/07/17/is-coursera-the-beginning-of-the-end-for-traditional-higher-education/

Title: Forbes - Is Coursera the Beginning of the End for Traditional Higher Education?

Abstract/Quotes:
"Could high-quality MOOCs eventually do to traditional colleges and universities what Craigslist has done to classified advertising in newspapers and what Wikipedia has done to encyclopedias? In other words, could Coursera and its ilk replace a $250,000 college degree and decimate the world of brick-and-mortar colleges and universities? Coursera doesn’t even have any plans to give degrees yet, or any revenue model. But along with Coursera, there are several other big, prestigious players who have launched successful, high-quality online courses, including edX, a joint venture of Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Udacity, founded by Sebastian Thrun of Stanford. What might all this mean 10 or 20 years from now?
...
According to the Times, this fall the University of Washington will offer credit for its Coursera classes in exchange for a fee, and some extra assignments and work with an instructor. That can only spread." -- from the Source

NOTE: This article from Forbes explores the impact of Massive Online Open Courseware (MOOC), some basic information how they work, and some of the providers of MOOCs.

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U-Va. takes major step in online education

U-Va. takes major step in online education | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 17, 2012
Source: Washington Post
URLs:
1) Article:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/u-va-takes-major-step-in-online-education/2012/07/16/gJQAF3YOqW_story_1.html

2) Printed Edition without images, but all on one page:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/u-va-takes-major-step-in-online-education/2012/07/16/gJQAF3YOqW_print.html

Title: (MOOCs) U-Va. takes major step in online education

Abstract/Quotes:
"Now, opposition is melting away. A compelling body of research has shown that some online initiatives yield improved outcomes at reduced cost, an irresistible proposition.

“We don’t want to be another industry that didn’t see change coming and, because they didn’t see it in time, they’re dead,” said James Dean, dean of the business school at the University of North Carolina, which is known for its online experimentation.
...
EdX and Coursera allow top schools to expand their global brand and share their intellectual capital with the world in the manner of academic missionaries. Perhaps as important, the online laboratories allow each institution to cultivate an internal digital culture.

“Simply put, online learning can substantially improve on-campus learning as well,” said Anant Agarwal, president of edX. “The way we educate students really hasn’t changed much in centuries.”

Some educators suggest that the global online platforms offer more flash than substance, and that financial benefits for schools are dubious.

“There’s no income from it. Nobody’s made a case that there will be any income from it,” said Marva Barnett, director of the Teaching Resource Center at U-Va. “Why is this such a desirable thing?”  -- From the Source

Note: There has been discussion about this article on Twitter about where the "compelling body of research" came from or even exists.

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Silicon Valley Firm To Help UVA Expand Online Courses : NPR

Published Date: July 17, 2012
Source: NPR Morning Edition transcript
URL: http://www.npr.org/2012/07/17/156891653/silicon-valley-firm-to-help-uva-expand-online-courses

Title: (MOOCs) Silicon Valley Firm To Help UVA Expand Online Courses

Abstract/Quotes:
"NPRs Claudio Sanchez: "SANCHEZ: In fact, not one of the 16 institutions that Coursera has signed up till now offers academic credit or a degree. Instead, students receive a certificate for completing courses that can last anywhere from four to 12 weeks. Coursera today enrolls 690,000 people in 190 countries and those numbers are growing.

The Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and investors, who thus far have put more than $22 million into the operation, believe they can make lots of money down the road.

The University of Virginia's vice provost Milton Adams says this is not just about money, for UVA it's a chance to join the ranks of institutions that are using technology to help democratize higher education around the world.
...
In a statement, UVA president Teresa Sullivan said: There are still many unknowns concerning online teaching. But this partnership will in no way diminish the value of a UVA. Degree - rather it will enhance its brand." -- from the Source

The Source is an NPR Morning Edition transcription. The original audio is available at this URL too.

 

I note with interest President Sullivan uses the words Degree and Brand in the closing remarks. Branding of Academic Institutions seems to be as important as their contribution to the traditional ideals of "increasing the body of knowledge" or "preparing the future leaders and contributors to a better society."

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