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Topics related to distance eLearning in academia and other organizations
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'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Many emails now being created, and thus potentially archived by libraries, are the contemporary equivalent not of paper letters, but of phone calls - which, with few exceptions, were unrecorded, and really were lost to history. 

 

... In terms of digital literary archives, one of the lessons for today's archivists is that so-called e-manuscripts are highly unstable, and need early curatorial intervention to secure them against the threats of technological obsolescence. This means that the writers involved become increasingly aware of interest in their papers, and for novelist Jonathan Franzen, this changes everything: 'Unfortunately, I think that once writers become self-conscious about preserving archival material, the game is over...I also don't see how you resist the temptation to select material that suggests the most flattering narratives. And not just select, but actively create!' ..." - from the Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

ghbrett's insight:

his post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

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ghbrett's curator insight, January 13, 2013 8:12 AM

This post is timely for me. Lately I have begun to realize just how much we citizens depend on Internet based programming, controllers, digital imaging, digital content, and more products. All of these are in my opinion targets or potentials recipients of either accidental or malicious elimination (e.g., massive EMP attack). This ecosystem also includes the management of analog devices like garage doors, security gates, and other systems that are managed by digital control. Another factor is rapid obsolescence. I a past job, one of my tasks was to transfer data (manuscripts and research) from old media to newer media. Like 5.25 inch CP/M hard sectored diskettes to 360KB single sided MS-DOS 5.25 inch diskettes. It may sound amusing, but it was a challenge then. Now the challenge is being referred to as "Curation" of data. Or colloquially, "Keeping up with the Jones's."

 

Is the future doom and gloom. Most likely not. But, I am considering producing more ink on paper for text and images that has a reputation for longevity or of archival quality. But, I have so much content, I am not sure that I will succeed. Besides, who cares at the moment other than myself or perhaps family members. (NB: as an informal Family Historian I now have over 14Gb of text, eBooks, images, census images, and other content. Who cares? I'm not sure.

 

So, I'll be on the look out for open, easily transportable technologies that will enable me to keep upgrading or transferring my data to the shiny new toys that the Jone's have.

 

At the very least this theme must be included in any Digital Literacy program as well as any activity that depends on clouds, wikis, blogs, tweets, social media, social photography, etc., etc..

 

If you have any suggestions, I'd be most interested in hearing about them.

 

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8 Types of Technology That Will Be Essential in the 2015 Workplace

"If technology continues to evolve at the current rate, the 2015 workplace could look quite different from today's office spaces -- and may even involve less traditional office space with the rise of telecommuting. From a company's hiring process to sharing knowledge with employees, technology has the ability to change the way we all work.

 

What technology will be essential in the 2015 workplace, but doesn't exist yet?" from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com

 

NOTE: This short post has 8 thought worthy services and technology that would prove mighty helpful in this digital world that is more complex every day. I like the info for "Learning Academies to Keep Up With New Knowledge" (aka Lifelong Learning).

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Frederic Hohl's curator insight, February 6, 2014 6:26 AM

What your working place might look in 2015?

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The Ultimate Guide To Emerging Technologies | Edudemic

The Ultimate Guide To Emerging Technologies | Edudemic | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 20, 2012
Source: EDUCEMIC blog


URL: http://edudemic.com/2012/07/the-ultimate-guide-to-emerging-technologies/

Title: The Ultimate Guide To Emerging Technologies

Abstract/Quotes:
"Gene therapy? Anti-aging drugs? Neuroinformatics? If this sounds like something out of some Minority Report, you’re in for a surprise. According to a simply amazing visualization by the geniuses at Envisioning Tech, all this and more is coming to your world in the next few decades.

And it all starts with education. If we want each of these incredible (some scary, some not) technologies to actually happen, we need to make sure every student and teacher sees this visualization. Seriously. Show this roadmap to a student contemplating a degree in science or math and they’ll be pretty inspired. Who wouldn’t want to be the person who discovered a way to build a SPACE ELEVATOR?! That’s right. That’s one of the emerging technologies."

NOTE: This is an infographic that projects the emergence of particular technologies up to 2040. Some will be applied in learning situations, others to the workplace, and others are scientific advances. The diagram is a PDF which is easier to read when enlarged.

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ghbrett's comment, August 23, 2012 9:14 AM
Update: There is an online interactive version of this infographic that pop's up info-bites about the topic as you mouse over the items. Got to: http://envisioningtech.com/envisioning2012/
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IBM senses change with its annual “5-in-5” list for 2012

IBM senses change with its annual “5-in-5” list for 2012 | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it
"As the year nears its close, IBM, as it has every year since 2006, has pulled out the crystal ball and given us its predictions of five innovations that it believes will impact our lives in the next five years. For this year’s “5-in-5” list, IBM has taken a slightly different approach, with each entry on the list relating to our senses. The company believes cognitive computing whereby computers learn rather than passively relying on programming will be at the core of these innovations, enabling systems that will enhance and augment each of our five senses." - from source http://www.gizmag.com/
ghbrett's insight:

This article is much like the New Media Consortium "Horizon Reports" but focusing on the 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing, and seeing. Each sense is a visual graphic based on an authors collection of projections related to that topic. It is worth taking the time to read, view each image, think on the projections, and then go through them one more time with the intent of connection the 5 projections into one holistic projection.

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 18, 2012 6:52 PM

This article is much like the New Media Consortium "Horizon Reports" but focusing on the 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing, and seeing. Each sense is a visual graphic based on an authors collection of projections related to that topic. It is worth taking the time to read, view each image, think on the projections, and then go through them one more time with the intent of connection the 5 projections into one holistic projection.

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The New Media Consortium Horizon Project

The New Media Consortium Horizon Project | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

The NMC Horizon Project, as the centerpiece of the NMC Emerging Technologies Initiative, charts the landscape of emerging technologies for teaching, learning, research, creative inquiry, and information management. Launched in 2002, it epitomizes the mission of the NMC to help educators and thought leaders across the world build upon the innovation happening at their institutions by providing them with expert research and analysis.

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