Distance Ed Archive
Follow
Find tag "EdX"
2.4K views | +0 today
Distance Ed Archive
Topics related to distance eLearning in academia and other organizations
Curated by ghbrett
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

MOOC's Take a Major Step Toward College Credit

MOOC's Take a Major Step Toward College Credit | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

"The American Council on Education (ACE) has agreed to review a handful of free online courses offered by elite universities and may recommend that other colleges grant credit for them.


The move could lead to a world in which many students graduate from traditional colleges faster by taking self-guided courses on the side, taught free by professors from Stanford University, the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and other well-known colleges." from source http://chronicle.com/

 

NOTE: This article is interesting in that it not only describes the rationale and process that The American Council on Education (ACE) will use to evaluate Coursera a Massive Open Online Course provider, but it also describes other related activities. Among those include funding from the Gates Foundation for similar evaluations. This is a quick and worthwhile read.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

The corridor of uncertainty: How open is open?

The corridor of uncertainty: How open is open? | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 13, 2012
Source: "The corridor of uncertainty" - personal blog
URL: http://acreelman.blogspot.fr/2012/07/how-open-is-open.html

Title: (MOOCs) How open is open?

Abstract/Quotes:
"The original model is highly collaborative with students aggregating and creating content, discussing and sharing new ideas in a dynamic but sometimes chaotic environment. The notion of the traditional linear course with predefined objectives becomes more fluid with each student participating on their own terms and with individual objectives.

Most of the headline-making MOOCs like EdX are highly traditional in format; online lectures, lesson plans, tests and reading with some kind of certificate of completion at the end (though never "real" university credits). The gap between these two models is so large that we may need to redefine the MOOC or bring in some new acronyms."

NOTE: This is an interesting article that questions some of the basis of MOOCs with citations (links) to other comments from other authors. A good starting point for more challenging comments about the topic of MOOCs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ghbrett
Scoop.it!

U-Va. takes major step in online education

U-Va. takes major step in online education | Distance Ed Archive | Scoop.it

Published Date: July 17, 2012
Source: Washington Post
URLs:
1) Article:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/u-va-takes-major-step-in-online-education/2012/07/16/gJQAF3YOqW_story_1.html

2) Printed Edition without images, but all on one page:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/u-va-takes-major-step-in-online-education/2012/07/16/gJQAF3YOqW_print.html

Title: (MOOCs) U-Va. takes major step in online education

Abstract/Quotes:
"Now, opposition is melting away. A compelling body of research has shown that some online initiatives yield improved outcomes at reduced cost, an irresistible proposition.

“We don’t want to be another industry that didn’t see change coming and, because they didn’t see it in time, they’re dead,” said James Dean, dean of the business school at the University of North Carolina, which is known for its online experimentation.
...
EdX and Coursera allow top schools to expand their global brand and share their intellectual capital with the world in the manner of academic missionaries. Perhaps as important, the online laboratories allow each institution to cultivate an internal digital culture.

“Simply put, online learning can substantially improve on-campus learning as well,” said Anant Agarwal, president of edX. “The way we educate students really hasn’t changed much in centuries.”

Some educators suggest that the global online platforms offer more flash than substance, and that financial benefits for schools are dubious.

“There’s no income from it. Nobody’s made a case that there will be any income from it,” said Marva Barnett, director of the Teaching Resource Center at U-Va. “Why is this such a desirable thing?”  -- From the Source

Note: There has been discussion about this article on Twitter about where the "compelling body of research" came from or even exists.

more...
No comment yet.