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What's working and what's not in social business

What's working and what's not in social business | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

"For the second year in a row, researchers surveyed more than 2,000 executives from 25 industries and 99 countries, and conducted interviews with nearly three dozen executives and social-business thought leaders. Their conclusion: The importance of social is growing across all industries. But the emergence of socially-connected enterprises isn't fast. According to the report:

 

Between last year and this year, respondents from all industry sectors increased the value they place on social business. None remained at the same level. None reversed course. However, progress is slow.

 

How slow? When asked to rank their company’s social business maturity on a scale of one to ten, more than half of respondents gave their company a score of three or below. Only 31 percent gave a rating of four to six, and just 17 percent ranked their company at seven or above. Aptly described by Gerald Kane, a professor at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College, social business has passed "the peak of faddishness" and companies are "starting to crack social’s code and turning to it for business advantage, intelligence and insight."


Via Andrew Spong
Mighty Casey's insight:

The challenge is that it's EDITORIAL, not advertising, when it comes to social business. IOW, you have to produce content that attracts your audience, not just straight-up sales messages. That's been the slowly-learned lesson for social business ...

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Andrew Spong's curator insight, August 16, 2013 11:31 AM

These are, you'd suspect, mostly the opinions of those working within legacy businesses. New entrants would provide a rather different set of answers.

 

If the legacy businesses want to keep trading in their current form, they'll need to do a lot better than this. Responses of this order infer the existence of significant skills/knowledge gaps, and strategic lacunae.

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What's working and what's not in social business

What's working and what's not in social business | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

"For the second year in a row, researchers surveyed more than 2,000 executives from 25 industries and 99 countries, and conducted interviews with nearly three dozen executives and social-business thought leaders. Their conclusion: The importance of social is growing across all industries. But the emergence of socially-connected enterprises isn't fast. According to the report:

 

Between last year and this year, respondents from all industry sectors increased the value they place on social business. None remained at the same level. None reversed course. However, progress is slow.

 

How slow? When asked to rank their company’s social business maturity on a scale of one to ten, more than half of respondents gave their company a score of three or below. Only 31 percent gave a rating of four to six, and just 17 percent ranked their company at seven or above. Aptly described by Gerald Kane, a professor at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College, social business has passed "the peak of faddishness" and companies are "starting to crack social’s code and turning to it for business advantage, intelligence and insight."


Via Andrew Spong
Mighty Casey's insight:

The challenge is that it's EDITORIAL, not advertising, when it comes to social business. IOW, you have to produce content that attracts your audience, not just straight-up sales messages. That's been the slowly-learned lesson for social business ...

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Andrew Spong's curator insight, August 16, 2013 11:31 AM

These are, you'd suspect, mostly the opinions of those working within legacy businesses. New entrants would provide a rather different set of answers.

 

If the legacy businesses want to keep trading in their current form, they'll need to do a lot better than this. Responses of this order infer the existence of significant skills/knowledge gaps, and strategic lacunae.

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Atul Gawande: How Do Good Ideas Spread?

Atul Gawande: How Do Good Ideas Spread? | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it
In the era of the iPhone, Facebook, and Twitter, we want frictionless, “turnkey” solutions to the major difficulties of the world. We prefer instructional videos to teachers, drones to troops, incentives to institutions.

Via Leonard Kish
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Leonard Kish's curator insight, August 4, 2013 10:39 AM

Ideas spread by talking. We're just relearning that social systems are the systems we keep trying to impact by other means and through other systems. People, their contexts and their motivations ,matter in how ideas and technology are adopted. Human relationships are perhaps more important to behavior change than any other influence.

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Survey: 76% of Patients Would Choose Telehealth Over Human Contact

Survey: 76% of Patients Would Choose Telehealth Over Human Contact | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

76% of patients would choose telehealth over human contact according to recent survey that highlights the increased trust in telehealth by consumers.

 

Consumer trust in telehealth is growing with 76% of patients choosing access to care over human interaction with their care provider according to a recent survey

 


Via nrip, Leonard Kish
Mighty Casey's insight:

And I'm one of them.

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Lou Fetscher's comment, March 11, 2013 8:14 PM
Seems to Parallel what is going on with education as well. On line programs vs on campus programs.
Rachel May's curator insight, March 22, 2013 6:28 AM

4. Healthcare

 

Another interesting pictograph on patient preferences in healthcare, indicating that technology is not only becoming more prevalent in our healthcare, but more prevalent in our expectations and preferences of healthcare.

Leonard Kish's curator insight, July 20, 2013 10:53 AM

Are you ready for this providers? Who's going to prepare docs for this new future? I hope med and nursing schools are paying attention.

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When Bad Heads Go Viral: How A Malformed Headline Is Skewing Our View Of The Patient's Role In Medicine

When Bad Heads Go Viral: How A Malformed Headline Is Skewing Our View Of The Patient's Role In Medicine | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it
In the business of medicine, one of the brightest hopes is the potential for re-optimizing our spend around what patients want.

Via AnneMarie Ciccarella
Mighty Casey's insight:

How information shi(f)t happens. Don't like the truth? Rewrite it in the headline, shi(f)t that story in your direction. <sigh>

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AnneMarie Ciccarella's curator insight, May 30, 2013 12:51 PM

Thanks to e-patient Dave for deciphering this .....

Heather Swift's curator insight, August 16, 2013 7:14 PM

When Bad Heads Go Viral: How A Malformed Headline Is Skewing Our View Of The Patient's Role In Medicine

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The Empowered Patient Decision Support App

The Empowered Patient Decision Support App | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

The Empowered Patient® Decision Support web app is a series of ten questions that help identify areas in which patients may need help and support when making health care decisions. The app produces a streamlined pdf report of areas where the patient feels confident and decisive – and areas in which the patient may need information and guidance.


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
Mighty Casey's insight:

Interesting ... would love your thoughts on this app's worth.

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rob halkes's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:34 AM

Inspring idea! Would love to see responses by NICE (UK) and IQWig (Germany). Are there some evalutions/reviews from users??

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Beyond pink - Occupy Healthcare

Beyond pink - Occupy Healthcare | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

MC: Until we recognize that cancer is an endless battle, all the pink ribbons in the world won't amount to a damn thing.

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Who's missing in #hcsm?

Who's missing in #hcsm? | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

Oh HELLZ yes! I wrote about this last year: http://cancerforchristmas.com/healthcare-arabspring/


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What does it mean to be a 'Key Opinion Leader' in medicine on Social Web?

Howard Luks MD (@hjliks) asks: what is the proper role for an MD KOL?

 

[AS: The definition of what constitutes leadership in medicine is evolving, and I'm totally with Howard and Natasha on this. How about you?]

 

[MC: I'm with Howard on this, too! It's not about marketing, it's about EDUCATION and PATIENT ENGAGEMENT. That's what drives good outcomes.]


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Pharma and healthcare innovation: ten steps forward

Pharma and healthcare innovation: ten steps forward | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

If one takes a long view of the history of technological innovation in business, a pattern can be perceived:

 

* An innovation emerges
* A cohort of early adopters perceive its superiority to existing solutions, identify the benefits it can bring to their business, and begin to evangelise
* Resistance is encountered from users of the incumbent dominant technologies, assisted by those who have a vested interest in its continuation such as vendors, developers, and service providers who have built business propositions around the existing solutions
* A break point is reached: the technology either continues to attract adopters organically until it becomes a dominant solution, or else it falters and becomes a residual technology, dwindling to the point where it is used only by ideologically committed devotees and hobbyists

 

The majority are now users of the dominant solution, with all its benefits, and all its flaws.

 

However, the restless early adopter cohort will long since have moved on to explore the possibilities of more recent innovations.

 

For them, evolution is not over, and innovation will never cease.

 

Those innovators within pharma who are forging its digital future are not distracted by the chimerical threat of adverse events, interminable discussions regarding regulations, or the comfortable futility of considering the various merits and disadvantages of this week’s new hardware or social platform.
In order to thrive within healthcare’s global future, pharma innovators understand that companies will need to:

 

1. Reform corporate strategies around the principles of social business
2. Be instrumental in precipitating the transition from treatment to prevention in healthcare
3. Find ways to add value to the shared decision making agenda
4. Socialise the clinical trial process
5. Become a trusted provider of accurate, balanced information about its own products in discoverable contexts such as Wikipedia
6. Move to, and then move beyond, mobile-first development
7. Make sensor technologies, genomics and personalised medicine central to the future development of their enterprise
8. Adopt open technologies
9. Deploy secure, cloud-based solutions
10. Support intrapreneurial activities

 

Hat tip to Johnathan Reid (@FarmerFunster) for reminding me how valuable and productive a concept intrapreneurialism is.


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Ten reasons why doctors should use Twitter

Ten reasons why doctors should use Twitter | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

Andrew Spong (@andrewspong) writes:

 

'Dr. Anne Marie Cunningham is an expert healthcare practitioner of the social web.

 

She offers insightful, incisive critiques of the use-value of social environments in the education and practice of healthcare professionals, and her blog is a must-add for your RSS reader.

Earlier today, she delivered a presentation at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Association for the Study of Medical Education entitled ‘Why does a Twittering doctor tweet’ (parallel sessions timetable PDF).

 

I look forward to reviewing the full presentation in due course. In the interim, as the event was not streamed Anne Marie has been kind enough to share the ten reasons why she believes healthcare professionals interested in medical education should use Twitter:

 

1. Connect

2. Engage

3. Inform

4. Share

5. Reflect

6. Be challenged

7. Be supported

8. Lead

9. Learn

10. Inspire

 

Personally, I’d extend that definition to include healthcare professionals of every stripe as I’d contend that the same benefits are both conferred upon and received by all those practitioners who elect to participate in social environments within the broader context of medicine’s education-practice-education continuum.'

 


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How Modern Economics Is Built On 'The World's Dumbest Idea'

How Modern Economics Is Built On 'The World's Dumbest Idea' | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it
How Modern Economics Is Built On ‘The World’s Dumbest Idea’: Maximizing Shareholder Value. The 21st Century needs a new economics for a new kind of management

Via Leonard Kish
Mighty Casey's insight:

The shareholder-value emperor has been naked for decades. Time somebody called him on it, 'cause letting him run management thinking has worked so very well for us, right?

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Leonard Kish's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:45 PM

Thanks to @jhagel for the link! Can we move from maximizing profits to sustainable profits? We often confuse maximization of profits with a sustainable company, but they are not at all synonymous.

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The value of big data in health care = $450 billion

The value of big data in health care = $450 billion | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

Exploiting Big Data in industry is Big News these days, and nowhere is the potential for leveraging the concept greater than in health care. McKinsey & Company estimates that harnessing big data across five dimensions of health care could yield nearly one-half trillion dollars’ worth of value in The ‘big data’ revolution in healthcare.

 

The chart summarizes McKinsey’s calculations on the value of Big Data in health care at its maximum.

 

Before digging into the value potential, just what is Big Data in health care? Statistics and information are generated in the health care system about patients: say, during visits with physicians, in lab tests, via digital imaging procedures, when filling prescriptions, and during inpatient hospital stays.

 

All of these data points “live” in various data systems: in physician office records systems (in paper files and, increasingly, in electronic health records, or EHRs), pharmacy claims systems (housed in systems managed by pharmacy benefits management companies and health plans), hospitals’ information systems, and — for people who self-track data at home and on-the-go but don’t communicate it to health providers, in consumers personal health records in the internet cloud (say, via the Withings Wi-Fi weight scale or Fitbit online portals).

 


Via nrip, Leonard Kish
Mighty Casey's insight:

Geektastic. In a good way.

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Leonard Kish's curator insight, July 20, 2013 10:59 AM

Holy Moley, No wonder Venture funding for Digital Health is doubling this year!!

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Facebook says yes to post-mastectomy photos

Facebook says yes to post-mastectomy photos | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it
New York breast cancer patient Scorchy Barrington appears to have won her battle to get Facebook to issue a formal policy on the posting of mastectomy photos.

Via Susan Zager
Mighty Casey's insight:

About fucking time.

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Susan Zager's curator insight, June 12, 2013 3:34 PM

The article states that Facebook posted this statement:

"We agree that undergoing a mastectomy is a life-changing experience and that sharing photos can help raise awareness about breast cancer and support the men and women facing a diagnosis, undergoing treatment, or living with the scars of cancer. The vast majority of these kinds of photos are compliant with our policies."

Thanks to Scorchy Barrington who started a petition signed by over 21,000 people on change.org opposing Facebook for not allowing The Scar Project to put post mastectomy photos on Facebook, they will now show these important photos as well as Annmarie Giannino-Otis's photos at Stupid Dumb Breast Cancer.

Although the Chicago Truibune was unable to reach Scorchy for a commment they quoted a statement from her on change.org saying,

"We want the world to know that breast cancer is not a pink ribbon — it is traumatic, it is life-changing, and it urgently needs a cure." Scorchy Barrington also has an excellent blog at : http://thesarcasticboob.com



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What do we mean when we talk about patient engagement?

What do we mean when we talk about patient engagement? | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

Patients today aren’t truly engaged with health technology or even with their own health.

 

This is the crux of a problem that we need to address before we can begin to understand patient engagement, empowerment, and how to use these relationships to fix a broken system.

 

Can we create persuasive technology to encourage patient engagement with the mere concept of their own health?

 

For example, when people are sick, we have a tendency to exhibit avoidant behavior (like taking “medication holidays” from prescription drugs.)

 

On the other hand, when we are healthy we don’t want to think about health, and companies have found it challenging to channel consumer interest toward something as innocuous as their own biometric data.

 

So next time we talk about patient engagement, let’s also consider how users relate to the concept of their own health and whether technology can be used to not only engage, but also advance positive health outcomes.

 


Via Andrew Spong
Mighty Casey's insight:

Healthcare happens every day, no MDs required. What IS required is paying attention, and being intentional. 

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"I want .. a cooperative between me & my patients"

"I want .. a cooperative between me & my patients" | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

MC: This guy is on the leading/bleeding edge of a trend that will revolutionize healthcare. We've waited for the system to reform itself. Now it's time to build a new system.

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Is critical thinking in your DNA?

Is critical thinking in your DNA? | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

Chris Jones (@sourcepov) writes:

 

'Unless you are a detective, a teacher or a literature buff, you probably don’t give critical thinking the time of day. Getting to the core of issues and understanding hidden implications is hard work. Most of us seem never to have the time, or when we do, we lack the energy.

But what’s the long-term effect when we turn away from deep reflection as a way to navigate the world’s challenges? Has reading with a discerning eye become a lost art?

 

And do our schools still give it the needed focus?

 

These and other aspects of critical thinking are woven throughout The DNA of Collaboration. It is an essential thread in the process of solving problems, not to mention the important work of framing our ideas in the first place. In the book, I touch on the core elements in Chapters 1 and 2, expand on them as we unpack collaboration, then pull all of the dimensions together in Chapter 20, making the case for why deep discernment skills are so important.

 

Let’s look at 5 of key aspects of this in today’s Virtual Book Tour conversation, 8/25 11aET:

 

Q1. Experts approach & define #criticalthinking very differently. In collaboration context, what if we define as: ‘deep & thorough analysis on many dimensions of problem or idea?’
Q2. Key dimensions of process include command of abstraction, context change, and root cause. Where & when in school must these be tackled?
Q3. How do we navigate news and other electronic information when what we receive is increasingly a blend of fact and opinion?
Q4. Bloom & Anderson lay out learning & knowledge dimensions. Can exposing this model to learners make them more self-aware?
Q5. Philosophers like Descartes & Kant had differing approaches for framing knowledge. Can we still learn from them?'

 

[AS: Presses all my buttons, and TY to Johnathan Reid (@farmerfunster) and Mike Baldwin (@mikey3982) for the steer. Looking forward to following the conversation on #cdna]

[MC: Here in the US, I feel like they've been putting something in the water supply for the last 50 years that turns off critical thinking - ooh, maybe it's soma! That's the only possible explanation for the complete dumbing down of our collective thought process.]


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Most brands are socially inept

Most brands are socially inept | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

Martyn Thomas writes:

 

'Brands seem quite happy to talk about themselves and be self-seeking in a heavy-handed and awkward kind of manner. This is largely borne out of never having the need or incentive to build relationships with their customers before.

 

In the past, the world of brands has been one of ‘react and measure’ as new products and services are ‘sold’ at us. Brands are struggling to change this practice of decades to one of ‘listen, learn and then engage’.

 

In the brave new world of social media people care most about a human connection with a brand, one that is real, not green-washed or good-washed, and certainly not a marketing message.'

 

[AS: Does this article see the bigger picture?

[CQ: methinks this is drive-by thinking, a great premise but not got much flesh on its bones

 

Whilst 'listening and learning', it is still possible to pretend that the precepts of 'marketing' as they are still generally understood -- selling to archetypes -- which are the cornerstones of most companies product communications have some sort of relevance within social contexts.

 

However, it's only when attempts to facilitate the sort of 'engagement' that such an attitudinal disposition veers toward that its unsuitability for purpose is disclosed.

 

On the social web, no-one cares about your sales model, your targets, or your earnest desire to convey a message about your brand. Why should they?

 

Remember to look for the sign that says 'sales pitches welcome!' on the way out.

 

You're going to have trouble finding it.

 

'If you're here to sell, then go to hell'


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"I'm slowly going deaf..." Frank Swain on becoming a cyborg

"I'm slowly going deaf..." Frank Swain on becoming a cyborg | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

Frank Swain (@SciencePunk) writes:

 

'First: the backstory. I’m slowly going deaf. No one knows why. First doctor blamed rock’n'roll.  Next one blamed my genetics. I’m still waiting for video games and teen sex to be indicted. They all agree that it’s irreversible.

 

The audiologist has a soft face and clean, nimble hands. His examination room is a brightly-lit white cube buried in a North London basement with a soundproof isolation chamber in the corner like a phonebox you’d go into to avoid speaking to someone. On his desk is a laptop and an anonymous block of proprietary hardware with a pop-up speaker. Cables snake across the desk to the isolation booth and back again. We did the whole isolation chamber thing last time. Result was the same as it was five years ago: my ears are remarkably, irreparably, buggered.

 

The doc takes out two drops of beige (Christ, why does it have to be beige?) plastic and flicks open the battery tray. He plugs two slender orange ribbons into the battery tray. As he does, the beige lumps squawk out in protest, like little birds. The orange ribbons plug into two more wires that lead into the laptop. Then he pulls out another device, a fat black coathanger bent into a serifed U, like the doctor’s end of a stethoscope. I can see is going to hang from my head in some way. It has two thumb drives which will eventually sit around the same height as my ears. Each of the thumb drives gets threaded with a plastic whisker at one end and a PS/2 cable at the other, which leads into the speakerbox. The speaker box starts to squelch at the coathanger, a continuous gargling note that starts low and blindly feels its way higher, higher, higher.'

 


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Could Wired's digital health conference series rout legacy conference organisers?

Could Wired's digital health conference series rout legacy conference organisers? | Disruptive-Thinking | Scoop.it

paidcontent.org writes:

 

'Earlier this month, we reported that, according to a recent study from digital health startup accelerator Rock Health, investments in health tech are up 73 percent over the same time last year. In the past year, the “Quantified Self” movement has also gained momentum, as consumers turn to fitness- and health-tracking devices, such as the Nike Fuel Band and the FitBit, to track their steps, calories burned and other physical activity.

 

“There are new opportunities to share data and collect data and analyze it,” said Brian Quinn, a senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “We see this data as a tool for helping us achieve [better health].”

 

In addition to the conference, Wired said it will launch a new health-focused vertical on Wired.com to give the title’s health tech coverage a dedicated destination. A Wired spokesman said the site is in the midst of a redesign and plans to launch the health vertical close to the conference. As readers migrate away from traditional platforms, the new vertical and conference gives Wired alternative ways to earn revenue.

 

[AS: Anything, but ANYTHING to disrupt the tired, heard-it-all-before 'digital health' conferences organised by the Usual Suspects' legacy businesses.]


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