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A Better Way to Think About Your Business Model

A Better Way to Think About Your Business Model | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

How Nespresso used a simple business model canvas to change face of the coffee industry.

 

The business model canvas — as opposed to the traditional, intricate business plan — helps organizations conduct structured, tangible, and strategic conversations around new businesses or existing ones. Leading global companies like GE, P&G, and Nestlé use the canvas to manage strategy or create new growth engines, while start-ups use it in their search for the right business model. The canvas's main objective is to help companies move beyond product-centric thinking and towards business model thinking.

 

To start, it lets you look at all nine building blocks of your business on one page:


Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A handy tool for keeping all of the key components of the business model in mind.

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Peter (PJ) Fulcher-Meredith's curator insight, May 6, 2013 5:31 PM

Why can't business always look for the simple way of expressing what are usually complex concepts. As I thinki Albert Einstein once said, "make things simple but not simpler." These charts become talking sticks, home bases around which the complex and necessary conversations take place. These charts provide the focus and the context.  What a beautiful thing!

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, May 7, 2013 5:42 PM

Canvas é muito prático mesmo ! Business Model YOU está aqui na fila de leituras.

ppmartin's curator insight, May 10, 2013 10:43 AM

Clever

Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation
Entrepreneurship based on "blue ocean" principles, i.e., "disrupting and changing the rules of the game".
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'We'll make driving so cheap only the rich will buy cars' - Telegraph

'We'll make driving so cheap only the rich will buy cars' - Telegraph | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

BMW is hoping to be in the vanguard of dealing with the changing way Britain’s city dwellers use vehicles by launching a joint venture with car rental company Sixt.

 

The companies have brought the DriveNow car-sharing model to London from Germany which allows users to locate, unlock and start cars using a mobile phone app, then drive them on a charge per minute basis.

 

The system – currently in a small scale test with a fleet of about 250 BMW 1 series and Minis – does away with the need for a central collect and return point so users can make one-way journeys.

 

DriveNow has agreed a deal with Islington, Hackney and Haringey councils allowing the cars to be parked in any on-street parking spaces, meaning they can be used in a similar way to London’s “Boris Bike” scheme, as long as they are dropped off within the three boroughs.

 

Peter Schwarzenbauer, BMW board manager said the company looked at the future of the car market several years ago and decided it needed to be in the sector.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Disruption is coming to the automotive industry because of rising ownership costs, inconvenience and shifting consumer needs. Increasingly younger consumers are rejecting the old ownership model that was largely based on status and replacing it with a mobility model. Automobiles are seen as a means to an end (mobility) rather than the end itself. This change is increasingly becoming the norm in urban areas where automobiles are seen as costly, inconvenient and inefficient. The quote from Alexander Sixt in the article sums up this change very nicely: "the scheme has the potential to revolutionise motoring and hopes to 'make mobility so cheap that only the rich will buy cars' ”. 

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The Internet of Things by 2020: what’s it worth? (INFOGRAPHIC)VizWorld.com | VizWorld.com

The Internet of Things by 2020: what’s it worth? (INFOGRAPHIC)VizWorld.com | VizWorld.com | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

While keeping tabs on the Internet of Things (IoT) this infographic appeared in one of Vizworld’s curation lists. If it seems simple or even simplistic consider that it is probably created for a general business audience. What’s most interesting is the visualization of the discrepancy between four highly regarded sources on the number of units that will be around in 2020, less than 6 years from now. The massive range from 26 billion units (Gartner) to 212 billion units (IDC) can be interpreted as probably a lack of consensus on what an IoT device is, or will be. Will it include your handheld device as well as your temperature-sensitive clothing? But certainly the market (or multiple markets) implementing sensors and connectivity will be both massive and profitable.

 

Though “managing vast amounts of data” is listed as a challenge, everything around Big Data and all of the useful data visualization that will make sense out of all of that raw information will be one of the biggest business opportunities. I’d say it’s an oversight to not have listed it in the infographic.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A very useful summary of 10 key questions about the Internet of Things. Companies and brands operating in the digital space should consider the implications of the coming changes forecasted for the next 5 years.

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The 50 Most Innovative Companies Of 2014: Strong Innovators Are Three Times More Likely To Rely On Big Data Analytics

The 50 Most Innovative Companies Of 2014: Strong Innovators Are Three Times More Likely To Rely On Big Data Analytics | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Companies who are strong at innovation are three times more likely to rely on big data analytics and data mining than their counterparts who are less adept at innovating (57% versus 19%).  67% of breakthrough innovators say their big data analytics and data mining efforts are paying off. These and many other findings are from the latest analysis of the world’s most innovative companies of 2014 published last month by Boston Consulting Group (BCG).  The Boston Consulting Group’s study, The Most Innovative Companies 2014: Breaking Through Is Hard to Do is accessible here.  You can download the PDF of the study methodology and results here (free, no opt-in). BCG has been publishing this study since 2005, basing it on interviews with 1,500 senior executives globally.

Forbes also has an annual list of the world’s most innovative companies you can find here.  For a comparison of the methodologies BCG and Forbes use in defining the most innovative companies, please see the section at the bottom of this post.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

An interesting report (which is free) from BCG documenting and ranking the top 50 Most Innovative Companies. It is packed full of #stats about a variety of innovation performance indicators. It is a useful discussion about the topic, although in some cases the measures and metrics used could be more clearly defined.

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Where Is Crowdfunding Headed? [Infographic]

Where Is Crowdfunding Headed? [Infographic] | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Some "$5.1 billion has been raised with crowdfunding so far in 2014," according to the following infographic by BusinessProfiles.

What will the future of crowdfunding look like, though?

"Equity crowdfunding" will increase, because the JOBS (Jumpstart Our Business Startups) Act lifted the ban on securities crowfunding for startups.

"Companies can now raise up to $1 million a year through crowdfunding without going through the process of registering the securities through the SEC," states BusinessProfiles.

"Donations crowdfunding" and "rewards crowdfunding" will also grow. That growth will occur more quickly in underdeveloped countries, and it will be slower in the US.


Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A good overview of the types of #crowdsourcing and the #trends occurring in the industry. A useful reference source with #stats. 

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CASUDI 's curator insight, October 3, 1:17 PM

These are amazing numbers ~ pay heed Entrepreneurs!

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A tweet-activated digital vending machine? At a bus stop? Yes, really… - Cream Blog

A tweet-activated digital vending machine? At a bus stop? Yes, really… - Cream Blog | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

I know we like to ramble on quite a bit about how much we love out-of-home advertising here at Cream, but once you see this latest effort from Walkers you will understand why…

 

Bus shelters in central locations in London, UK, have been taken over for two weeks by the crisps brand thanks to a new campaign in partnership with OMD UK, AMV BBDO, Talon and Clear Channel.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A creative and innovative convergence of out-of-home advertising, social media, direct response and vending machine technology that creates a new customer experience. Very cool.

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IFTF: 20 Combinatorial Forecasts

IFTF: 20 Combinatorial Forecasts | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it
The future of technology is an unfamiliar territory ...

This technology horizon map is designed to help you anticipate the future of combinatorial innovations emerging at the intersection of distinct territories. Use this map to visualize the whole range of innovations and see the bigger picture—a more interconnected technology landscape.

The map presents 20 new innovative combinatorial forecasts you can use to navigate the future as it unfolds. Each of these forecasts—such as the microbiome mediates the war on germs, thinking and feeling become quantifiable,biomanufacturing unites mother nature with the man-made, and 17 more!—is built on a range of enabling technologies and newly opening possibilities. 

We invite you to think big and draw insights from the 20 Combinatorial Forecasts map. Read through all the forecasts; take a step back and imagine yourself or your organization in this fascinating new landscape. What are the new opportunities for you? What are the emerging challenges?

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A different way to visualize the future possibilities for technology change. The core message is that opportunities will increasingly result from combinations of technologies. While this map shows 20 possibilities, many more combinations are possible.

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Wearable tech - social media data graphic

Wearable tech - social media data graphic | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

If I said ‘wearable tech‘ to you, what would you think of?

With big names like Google Glass and the imminent release of the iWatch hitting the headlines almost daily and wrists everywhere modelling fitness trackers like the Fitbit and the FuelBand, it wouldn’t take you long to conjure up an example.

 

A couple of years ago, technology that you’d wear every day to enrich your day-to-day life was not exactly widespread.

The last two years has seen a massive surge in the production of wearable technology products and what was once deemed as futuristic geekdom is now pretty common stuff.

There’s a lot said about wearable tech, and what one journalist writes off as ‘over-hyped’ is another’s game-changer. It can be tough to work out whether people seem to think wearable tech is a great idea, or whether they aren’t actually keen.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

#Wearable Technology may be gaining traction...but its still hard to tell. You be the judge, see the infographic for trends and stats.

 

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Has ‘Disruptive Innovation’ Run Its Course? Not Yet…-- K@W

Has ‘Disruptive Innovation’ Run Its Course? Not Yet…-- K@W | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

According to one critique, the concept of disruptive innovation has been allowed to run amok. Is it time to question how the term is being applied?

 

The father of the theory of disruptive innovation, Harvard Business School professor Clayton M. Christensen, who coined the term in his 1997 book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, has offered an initial response to the criticisms in aBloomberg Businessweek interview. In that piece, Christensen calls Lepore’s article a “criminal act of dishonesty.” He goes on to say that Lepore broke “all of the rules of scholarship that she accused me of breaking — in … truly egregious ways. In fact, every one — every one — of those points that she attempted to make [about The Innovator’s Dilemma] has been addressed in a subsequent book or article. Every one! And if she was truly a scholar as she pretends, she would have read [those].”


Lepore’s polemic may or may not signal the beginning of the end for disruptive innovation as the knee-jerk answer to all institutional ills, but it has undoubtedly given great energy to the discussion of what was once a discrete and considerably more modest theory. “I do think this interaction is healthy in that we are all talking,” says Wharton management professor Rahul Kapoor. “It serves perhaps to discipline the use of the term and the application of the term … closer to what the research meant.”
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The concept appears to be more a matter of degree rather than an absolute. Clearly, the concept needs fleshing out with more attention devoted to definitional clarity, typology development and empirical validation. What is it exactly? Business model change? Technology displacement? Both? And what are the predictive effects at the firm, and industry levels of analysis? All questions that need answers in the debate.

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Innovation Excellence | What to Make of Jill Lepore’s Attack on Disruption?

Innovation Excellence | What to Make of Jill Lepore’s Attack on Disruption? | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Clayton Christensen comes under attack by Harvard colleague, Jill Lepore. She slams disruptive innovation as a “competitive strategy for an age seized by terror.

 

In 1997, a little known Harvard professor named Clayton Christensen published a surprise bestseller called The Innovator’s Dilemma, where he coined the term disruptive technology, which later evolved into disruptive innovation and became a mantra for the digital age.

 

Yet in a well argued piece in The New Yorker, his colleague at Harvard, the celebrated historian Jill Lepore, cries foul.  She calls disruptive innovation a “competitive strategy for an age seized by terror.”  “Transfixed by change,” she writes, “it’s blind to continuity.”

 

It’s not just Christensen’s theories that Lepore opposes, but what she calls the “rhetoric of disruption” which leads us to seek change for change’s sake, undermining productive stability.  She also points out that disruption is no panacea and leads to failure more often than it does to success. Is it time to rethink our culture of disruption?

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A thoughtful article written by Greg Satell that helps clarify the controversy around Christensen's theory of #disruptiveinnovation. The focus on changes to the the underlying #businessmodel seems to be the key. It is also helpful to consider that there are several different ways that #innovation can occur as illustrated in the matrix.

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Tesla Lets Go, to Gain the Market | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

Tesla Lets Go, to Gain the Market | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Can a corporation let go, in order to win it all?

Tesla has deployed a business strategy we call “Provide a Platform” which enables your ecosystem to design, build, enhance, fulfill, support your own products for you.

 

Tesla, who’s already a market leader in their category, made a surprising move, by releasing their patents as open source.  This move patterns co-innovation moves we see from companies in the Collaborative Economy that are partnering with their own customers to create products likeGE+Quirky, Barclay’s Card Ring, and others companies that I share from my presentations.

 

This also show’s Tesla’s commitment towards social good, as Musk writes that most car companies only have a fraction (1%) of their sales as electric vehicles. He writes, “It is impossible for Tesla to build electric cars fast enough to address the carbon crisis.” In essence, he wants everyone else to help.

 

For Tesla, this fosters an ecosystem of makers, hackers, developers, and partners around their brand, growing their position in the ecosystem as Tesla will become the standard of the electric vehicle (EV) industry.  Why would a dominant player let go? This enables others to build on top of their platform in order to replicate, enhance, and improve existing Tesla vehicles.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A good example of primary demand stimulation through technology sharing.

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Five brands using crowdsourcing for product and marketing ideas

Five brands using crowdsourcing for product and marketing ideas | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

During a recent discussion about a colleague’s obsession with Lego I was informed of the toymaker’s forays into crowdsourcing new product ideas.

This isn’t a particularly new tactic and I’ve flagged upexamples of crowdsourcing in the past, but it’s a topic that’s worth revisiting as more brands get on board.

 

So in order to inspire your own campaigns or product development, here are five other brands using crowdsourcing...

Lego

As mentioned in the intro, Lego has a dedicated site for fans and customers to contribute their own product ideas.

 

Other users can then vote for their favourite idea, state how much they’d pay for it and explain why they like it so much.

 

If more than 10,000 people support the idea then it goes to the official Lego review board who decide whether or not to put it into production.

 

The creations currently being debated include a replica of Batman’s Wayne Manor, the boat and shark from Jaws, and a red squirrel.

 

It’s a brilliant way for Lego to pilfer ideas from its own customers and test them among the wider community.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A fascinating look at how five major brands are using #crowdsourcing to find innovative product and marketing ideas. The article includes videos and links to examples.

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Michael Binzer's curator insight, May 15, 12:03 PM

This idea is not new, but nonetheless relevant for developing your product. I got inspired - how about you?

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Brand Disruptors: Amazon Changes the Game, Turns Twitter Into a Shopping Mall

Brand Disruptors: Amazon Changes the Game, Turns Twitter Into a Shopping Mall | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Brandchannel - always branding. always on.

 

Tweeting just got sweeter—or shopping just got Tweeter—for Amazon customers thanks to a newsocial integration that lets users add items to their shopping cart by responding to links on Twitter with the hashtag #AmazonCart (in the U.S) or #AmazonBasket (in the U.K.), a move that makes social shopping easier and—dare we say—fun.

 

“Add it now, buy it later” is the slogan, and it seems to be as simple to use as that tagline. Once an Amazon account is linked to a Twitter account, responding to a link with the requisite hashtag puts the item in your cart along with a reply tweet from @MyAmazon.

 

While hashtags make the process simple, it’s simultaneously a public broadcast of what one is buying—as well as user-generated marketing for Amazon and the latest step in making shopping more social and seamless.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Online shopping has changed in a massively new way with #Amazon's move into the #Twitter-sphere. Without a doubt, many #retailers will try to emulate.

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Corporate Courtships: How Social Businesses Can Seal the Deal

Corporate Courtships: How Social Businesses Can Seal the Deal | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Partnering with the wrong corporation can spell disaster for a growing social enterprise. Here’s what to consider before getting wed to a new initiative.

 

There was no shortage of causes to help when Tyler Merrick started a new social business back in 2008, so he decided to tackle seven areas of need: feeding the hungry, healing the sick, housing the homeless, teaching children, quenching the thirsty with clean water, counseling a child of war and planting trees to save the earth.

 

His idea for what became known as Project 7 sounded simple enough—sell everyday, on-the-go products like gum, mint and bottled water then contribute a portion of the profits to partner nonprofits that had proven track records for creating impact. But Merrick also knew that he needed to find willing retail and manufacturing partners who could scale that impact to the next level.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

An interesting discussion about how #socialbusiness can partner with for-profit corporations to generate big results.

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Inside the Digital Catapult, six startups at the forefront of data innovation

Inside the Digital Catapult, six startups at the forefront of data innovation | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

At the opening of the Digital Catapult innovation centre in November 2014, digital economy minister Ed Vaizey said: “It is an exciting time to be a tech business in the UK. Our digital economy is already one of the strongest markets in the world, valued at more than £100bn.

“Growth areas – including the internet of things (IoT) and digital creative industries – are opening a range of opportunities for companies in the sector.

 

Keeping British technology companies at the forefront of innovation is critical to the Innovate UK-funded Connected Digital Economy Catapult’s mission. 

 

With startup incubators springing up around the country – Digital Catapults are also opening in Brighton, Bradford and Sunderland – digital startups do not want for hothouses.

 

The London Digital Catapult is above the Euston Road, opposite the British Library and equidistant between Kings Cross St Pancras and Euston stations. CEO Neil Crockett describes it as just five minutes’ walk from virtually anywhere in the UK.

 

Just after a few weeks, the centre had attracted digital innovators specialising in the field of data. The other three Digital Catapults will specialise in location services, health technology and security.

Some of the startups using the centre lined up at a media data recently, to demonstrate how they are trying to foster a culture of innovation – and invited Computer Weekly along to have a look.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article showcases the innovations being supported by the Digital Catapult innovation center in the UK. The examples highlighted in this article show the diversity and range of applications possible in the emerging area of sensor technologies and the #InternetofThings. 

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Innovation Excellence | The Value Proposition Canvas

Innovation Excellence | The Value Proposition Canvas | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Achieve Product-Market Fit with Our Brand New Value Proposition Canvas

I’m a big fan of the Lean Startup movement and love the underlying principle of testing, learning, and pivoting by experimenting with the most basic product prototypes imaginable – so-called Minimal Viable Products (MVP) – during the search for product-market fit. It helps companies avoid building stuff that customers don’t want. Yet, there is no underlying conceptual tool that accompanies this process. There is no practical tool that helps business people map, think through, discuss, test, and pivot their company’s value proposition in relationship to their customers’ needs. So I came up with the Value Proposition Canvas together with Yves Pigneur and Alan Smith.

 

The Value Proposition Canvas is like a plug-in tool to the Business Model Canvas. It helps you design, test, and build your company’s Value Proposition to Customers in a more structured and thoughtful way, just like the Canvas assists you in the business model design process (I wrote more about how we came up with this new tool previously).

 

The Canvas with its niine building blocks focuses on the big picture. The Value Proposition Canvas zooms in on two of those building blocks, the Value Proposition and the Customer Segment, so you can describe them in more detail and analyze the “fit” between them. Companies need to get both right, the “fit” and the business model, if they don’t want to go out of business, as I described in an earlier post on failure. The tools work best in combination. One does not replace the other.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

An interesting heuristic that can aid in the development of a value proposition for a new venture. 

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Thoughts from Innovation Ireland Forum 2014 in one infographic

Thoughts from Innovation Ireland Forum 2014 in one infographic | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

The Innovation Ireland Forum 2014 brought together some of the brightest minds in industry, academia and entrepreneurship to discuss the future of technology in our society.

 

On Friday, 24 October in the Guinness Storehouse, Dublin, representatives from Intel, Bell Labs, ESB Networks, Irish Research Council, Nuritas and more came together to demystify concepts such as bioinformatics, the internet of things (IoT), next-wave analytics, and open innovation and collaboration in industry and academia.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A summary of highlights and thoughts from the addresses made at the recent Innovation Ireland Forum 2014. It is interesting to see how Ireland may be trying to position itself across a number of hot emerging technologies.

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Harvard Business Review Analytic Services Report

Harvard Business Review Analytic Services Report | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Download the Harvard Business Review report, sponsored by Verizon, here. Learn about the strong correlation between the early adoption of new technologies and better business outcomes. To beat the competition, many organizations are embracing new technologies to innovate and adapt to trends.


According to a recent Harvard Business Review Analytic Services report from Verizon, the businesses that are first to adopt new technologies are also the ones experiencing the most growth. The report also suggests that the longer this adaptation takes, the more opportunities are lost—leading to slower growth. 


Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Get this report that documents the first mover advantages and consequent business growth outcomes that result from the early adoption of new technologies. A very interesting and worthwhile read.

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The Future is Bright for the Mobile App Industry [Infographic]

The Future is Bright for the Mobile App Industry [Infographic] | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Yesterday we shared Gartner's list of the top mobile application developers. The list ranks the providers Gartner feels are best at enabling IT developers to create mobile applications for customers, partners and employees.

 

But what, you may be wondering, does the future hold for mobile app development? Relax — we've got you covered. Or actually, our friends at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Collat School of Business have you covered.

 

The team there just created an infographic that explains trends in mobile app development.

We're All on Our Smartphones

More than 91 percent of the US population has a cell phone — and six in 10 of those are smartphones. With more than 10 billion mobile Internet devices expected to be in use by 2016, the mobile application industry will grow tremendously to match demand and keep up with ever-evolving technologies, the UAB team predicts.

Right now, developers have a strong focus on apps in the areas of social networking, context-aware marketing, location-based services,  mobile search, mobile commerce, object recognition and mobile payment systems.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The infographic attached to this article details some of the stats behind the explosive growth in #mobile app development for the foreseeable future.

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CASUDI 's curator insight, October 3, 12:34 PM
Small Business owners often ask me "is there a future for mobile apps, should I be thinking about this as soon as it becomes an affordable option for a small biz?" ~ I actually have found an affordable way for a small biz to have an app pf their very own!
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What Will the Internet Look Like in the Next Century? - Marketing Technology Blog

What Will the Internet Look Like in the Next Century? - Marketing Technology Blog | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

To think that my children are growing up in an age where the Internet was always here is quite amazing. The fact that we’ve moved from simple dial-up to having dozens of devices in our homes that are connected, recording, and helping us navigate daily is incredible. Thinking 100 years from now is well-beyond my vision. With the explosion of mobile and our devices getting more and more powerful, I can only guess that displays will be everywhere and our mobile devices will be all we have aside from the cloud.

 

No doubt everything will be connected and optimized. Our refrigerators will automatically toss our food and get everything delivered, by recipe, for our planned meals. Our cars will be driving themselves. I can only imagine some of us will even have volunteered to be wired full times – perhaps with devices implanted for recording our visual and audio as needed. We’ll have some kind of projection device to bring up our applications or messaging wherever we are – with audio and video streaming without issue. Perhaps fold-up or rolled-up displays will be in our backpacks.

 

I suppose we’ll also have the bad, too. A black Internet that’s the very scariest of anonymous humanity waiting to provide you anything you need at the literal blink of an eye. Ok… I don’t want to think about this anymore.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A speculative glimpse at the internet of the future.

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Demographics, Wealth, Resiliency Add Up To More Over-Fifty Entrepreneurs

Demographics, Wealth, Resiliency Add Up To More Over-Fifty Entrepreneurs | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

What’s a classic profile of an entrepreneur? Smart, prone to risk and under the age of thirty. 

Steve Young of StreetWizeTechnologies personifies some of those qualities, except he’s a 56-year old starting a new business aimed at older motorcycle riders.

Young takes his fiery orange Harley Davidson touring bike out for a spin near his shop in Nashua. Soon he’ll install a product in the bike that you can’t see: a hidden third wheel. 

He and a business partner are marketing what he calls a dual glide conversion kit for a specific type of customer.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The changing demographics of entrepreneurship.

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Innovation Excellence | SMEs Risk Becoming Collateral Damage in “Innovation Wars”

Innovation Excellence | SMEs Risk Becoming Collateral Damage in “Innovation Wars” | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it
SMEs are helplessly squeezed between tech start-ups and global corporations in this battle. SMEs should start their innovation engines, imagine their exciting futures and capitalise on these new disruptive technologies. The alternative is to become collateral damage in the crossfire between the faster and the mightier.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Good advise for #SMB that want to avoid the squeeze between large global organizations and tech start-ups that aim to disrupt existing business models.

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Jill Lepore: What the Theory of “Disruptive Innovation” Gets Wrong

Jill Lepore: What the Theory of “Disruptive Innovation” Gets Wrong | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Clayton Christensen’s theory of “disruptive innovation” is founded on anxiety, fear, and shaky evidence.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

For students of "disruptive innovation" and "creative destruction" a thought provoking article that suggests Christensen's "theory" is tautological and unable to make predictions.

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Uber Sees Surge in Users as Cabbies Clog Streets in Protests Across Europe

Uber Sees Surge in Users as Cabbies Clog Streets in Protests Across Europe | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Streets across London, Paris, Berlin, Madrid, Milan and Lisbon are at a standstill. Is it the end of the world? No; but for cabbies, it might be.

Today, thousands of licensed cab drivers across major European cities are protesting private transportation app Uber, which has been stealing away business from London's black-cab drivers and hundreds more in what Uber has called "healthy competition" in an industry that has been unchanged for decades.

The San Francisco-based startup now operates in more than 100 cities in 37 countries with a value of $17 billion, but it's not alone. Similar apps like Hailo and Kabbee use private-hire drivers with their own vehicles to pick up passengers, who can arrange for a car at the touch of a screen. The original service has spawned lower-tier options as well, including UberX and now UberTAXI, which the company launched in response to the London protest and allows users to virtually hail a London black cab. 

But besides putting more control in consumers' hands, Uber is facing claims from local companies and governments that the service evades local taxes and licensing laws, putting regular cabbies at a disadvantage.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Disruption from the sharing economy puts consumers in control.

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This Nigerian College Student Built a Wind- And Solar-Powered Car From Scraps

This Nigerian College Student Built a Wind- And Solar-Powered Car From Scraps | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

Segun Oyeyiola took a Volkswagen Beetle and turned it into a fully renewable off-road vehicle. He's not going to stop working on it until it becomes the future of driving in Nigeria.

 

When it comes to the success of the electric car, billionaire Elon Musk is viewed as nothing short of a miracle worker. But roughly 8,000 miles away from Tesla's Palo Alto headquarters, Segun Oyeyiola has also managed to make something extraordinary on a smaller scale. The engineering senior at Nigeria's Obagemi Awolowo University spent a year retrofitting a Volkswagen Beetle into a wind and solar-powered car, partly made of free scrap parts donated by friends and family. Everything else cost under $6,000.

There's little question as to why Oyeyiola, who is taking his finals in the next two weeks, would devote so much of his extra-curricular time and resources to the project.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Ingenious example of #sustainable #technology.

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, May 10, 9:21 AM

Cool! More creative inventors and the media talking about it is what we need.

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Framework: Collaborative Economy Honeycomb | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

Framework: Collaborative Economy Honeycomb | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business | Disruptive Entrepreneurship & Innovation | Scoop.it

The Collaborative Economy enables people to efficiently get what they need from each other. They use powerful technologies that enable Crowdfunding, Peer-to-Peer lending, the Maker Movement, and the Sharing Economy. If you look closely, the crowd is becoming like a company: self funding, designing, producing, and sharing what they already have.

 

Similarly, in nature, honeycombs are resilient structures that efficiently enable many individuals to access, share, and grow resources among a common group. Various types of bees work in a collaborative manner to feed, care, and grow offspring and grow the colony.  Furthermore, the honeycomb structure spreads the load across the structure, wastes little in it’s design, and are easy to replicate at scale.

 

In this visual representation, this economy is organized into 6 discrete families (goods, services, space, etc), 14 sub-classes (bespoke goods, personal services, workspace, etc) and dozens of example companies (Airbnb, Uber, Shapeways, etc). In prior taxonomies, there were five families, but now we’re seeking rapid growth in the food sector, which deserved it’s own hexagon.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

With this thoughtful descriptive framework, Jeremiah Owyang has synthesized a new vision of the future of business.

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Laura Hansen's curator insight, July 22, 1:22 PM

What we are seeing now is a natural restoration of a functional community. We're rehabilitating from the consumer/extraction model. This model wasn't designed to build communities. It was designed to extract as much as possible from the community in the shortest amount of time without anyone noticing.

 

We are rebuilding our communities from the ground up. If we remain mindful, never again will corporations be the mastermind of a community. If we all pitch in, we have good days ahead.