Disney Rocks!!!!
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Rescooped by Rebecca Durante McMillan from Assistive Technology for Education & Employment
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Disney invents touchscreen that lets you feel textures

Disney invents touchscreen that lets you feel textures | Disney Rocks!!!! | Scoop.it
It paves the way for phones and tablets that transmit not only audio and visual information, but touch signals, as well.

Via Diana Petschauer
Rebecca Durante McMillan's insight:

Love this!  How cool is that!

more...
Diana Petschauer's curator insight, November 1, 2013 11:37 AM

"The technology is called “tactile rendering of 3D features,” and an early version of a rendering algorithm has already been developed by engineers at Disney Research in Pittsburgh. The process behind it is, predictably, both technical and confusing, but the basic premise is that small, electronic pulses can trick your fingers into perceiving bumps and texture, even if the surface is actually flat."

 

This research and technology is going to be phenomenal for offering further access to those who are blind/ low vision and others who benefit from the tactile feedback.

Jamie Ruppert's curator insight, January 30, 2014 1:58 PM

What's next? Taste and smell through a screen?

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Rescooped by Rebecca Durante McMillan from Assistive Technology for Education & Employment
Scoop.it!

Disney invents touchscreen that lets you feel textures

Disney invents touchscreen that lets you feel textures | Disney Rocks!!!! | Scoop.it
It paves the way for phones and tablets that transmit not only audio and visual information, but touch signals, as well.

Via Diana Petschauer
Rebecca Durante McMillan's insight:

Love this!  How cool is that!

more...
Diana Petschauer's curator insight, November 1, 2013 11:37 AM

"The technology is called “tactile rendering of 3D features,” and an early version of a rendering algorithm has already been developed by engineers at Disney Research in Pittsburgh. The process behind it is, predictably, both technical and confusing, but the basic premise is that small, electronic pulses can trick your fingers into perceiving bumps and texture, even if the surface is actually flat."

 

This research and technology is going to be phenomenal for offering further access to those who are blind/ low vision and others who benefit from the tactile feedback.

Jamie Ruppert's curator insight, January 30, 2014 1:58 PM

What's next? Taste and smell through a screen?