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Diseases
Diseases of civilization and other
Curated by Veronika Bujok
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New Ingredients in Fight Against Childhood Obesity - Public News Service

New Ingredients in Fight Against Childhood Obesity - Public News Service | Diseases | Scoop.it
New Ingredients in Fight Against Childhood Obesity Public News Service PHOTO: Making fresh produce markets as accessible as fast-food outlets in low-income areas of New York State is just one aspect of new efforts being brought to bear on childhood...
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Study: Stigmatizing obesity leads to obesity - Salon

Study: Stigmatizing obesity leads to obesity - Salon | Diseases | Scoop.it
Salon
Study: Stigmatizing obesity leads to obesity
Salon
Numerous causes contribute to the nation's obesity epidemic, including our increasingly sedentary lifestyles and the easy availability of high-calorie foods.
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Heart Disease Risk Factors Infographic | New Visions Healthcare Blog

Heart Disease Risk Factors Infographic | New Visions Healthcare Blog | Diseases | Scoop.it
Experts report that young women could decrease their risk of getting heart disease just by increasing omega-3 fatty acid rich fish intake.

Via 27 Heart Disease, Seth Bilazarian, MD
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re: re: Worst Hormone-Disrupting Chemicals Revealed, and They Could Be Raising Your Family’s Cancer Risk

re: re: Worst Hormone-Disrupting Chemicals Revealed, and They Could Be Raising Your Family’s Cancer Risk | Diseases | Scoop.it
tropmm, supposedly underwire bras do contribute to breast cancer, but here's the thing: I've worn one all my life and I NEVER have marks on my body from it like so many mention. Just make it looser around your rib cage.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Can Vitamin D Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Vitamin D Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? | Diseases | Scoop.it
A current study is recruiting prediabetic adults. (Can Vitamin D Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?: A current study is recruiting prediabetic adults.
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Tesco unveils 10 point soft drinks plan to tackle obesity

Tesco unveils 10 point soft drinks plan to tackle obesity | Diseases | Scoop.it
Tesco has unveiled a 10-point plan to “fight obesity” in soft drinks… (Tesco unveils 10 point soft drinks plan to tackle obesity: http://t.co/yiIQLyh77s via @TheGrocer)...
Veronika Bujok's insight:

Obesity, a major problem of today's population, can it still be anything more to do?

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What is a Migraine-Causes of Migraine Headaches

What is a Migraine http://youtu.be/WRs2OND_pFE Discover the causes of migraine headaches and the cures for migraines. Learn how to treat a migraine without d...
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Male Genetic Flaw Triggers Cancer, Diabetes Onset - Bioscience Technology

Male Genetic Flaw Triggers Cancer, Diabetes Onset - Bioscience Technology | Diseases | Scoop.it
Bioscience Technology Male Genetic Flaw Triggers Cancer, Diabetes Onset Bioscience Technology “Because estrogen may function through the NCOA5 gene and previously has been found to play somewhat of a protective role against both diseases, the...
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The next frontier in heart care: Research aims to personalize treatment with genetics

The next frontier in heart care: Research aims to personalize treatment with genetics | Diseases | Scoop.it

Cardiologists have struggled in recent years to score major advances against heart disease and stroke. Although death rates have been dropping steadily since the 1960s, progress combating the twin diseases has plateaued by other measures.

Genetics has had a profound impact on cancer treatment in recent years. Now, heart-disease specialists hope genetics will reveal fresh insight into the interaction between a person's biology, living habits and medications that can better predict who is at risk of a heart attack or stroke.

Heart disease is linked to about 800,000 deaths a year in the U.S. In 2010, some 200,000 of those deaths could have been avoided, including more than 112,300 deaths among people younger than 65. Now, widespread prevalence of obesity and diabetes threatens to undermine such gains. And a large gap remains between how white patients and minorities—especially African-Americans—benefit from effective strategies.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:33 AM

There's great hope that personalized genetic testing can help with both risk assessment and helping to streamline treatment decisions for patients.  Being able to tell a patient that based on your genetic profile you have a 60% chance of response to treatment A and a 30% chance of response to treatment B would be a fantastic advance in treatment efficiency and cost. Unfortunately, the closest thing we currently have , to this in current application is genetic testing for the drug Plavix (clopidogrel) and the adoption has been fraught with difficulty.  Clinicians and patients wait with eager anticipation of this research.

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 30, 2013 9:02 PM

About 800,000 deaths a year in the U.S. due to heart disease... while better treatments are always welcome, the best -- an least costly -- treatment is prevention = healthy lifestyle!

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Merits of Subtyping Obesity:  One Size Does Not Fit All

Merits of Subtyping Obesity:  One Size Does Not Fit All | Diseases | Scoop.it

 Within the obesity field there has been increasing recognition that prevention and treatment programs should be culturally sensitive and that the prevalence of risk factors and obesity may vary by race or ethnicity, but the same basic recommendations for prevention and treatment are given in all settings. An important question is whether this is one reason for not achieving better treatment outcomes.

Currently many obesity treatment studies have overall small effects, but substantial variability in results, with some individuals having a large amount of weight loss and others gaining weight. The focus on mean overall effects may preclude identifying an effective treatment program for a specific subtype of obesity, but not others.

High insulin secretion low responsiveness to internal satiety signals, high responsiveness to external food cues; learned patterns and preference for foods high in calories, fat, sugar, and salt; binge eating or food addiction; and low reinforcing value of activity or high reinforcing value of being sedentary. However, these are only several possible subtypes but others may exist.

Currently, major advances are being made in statistical methods to understand the development of obesity, the neuroscience of eating behaviors, use of sensors to better measure exposures, and exploration into the functional role of genetic polymorphisms associated with obesity. Additional advances are needed in how to conceptualize and phenotype the outcome of obesity. The one-size-fits-all approach is yielding small average weight losses. 

The molecular pathological epidemiology model has recently emerged to help address the heterogeneity of disease. Obesity is a heterogeneous and complex disease influenced by exogenous and endogenous exposures. Stratifying obesity into meaningful subtypes could provide a better understanding its causes and enable the design and delivery of more effective prevention and treatment interventions.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, November 4, 2013 12:43 PM

Generalization is sometimes useful, but in medicine often results form intellectual laziness or pharmaceutical companies attempting to have broad commercial applications for their therapies.  This editorial on the need to sub-type different types of obesity so different treatment strategies can be tested and tailored for best outcomes for patients affiliated with obesity makes a lot of sense.  It would also have significant impact on the cost of treatment from a public health standpoint since therapies could be used when most effective and avoided when they are unlikely to be effective..  This may be why there are so many commercially successful diet programs iand books because some of the programs DO work fro some of the people who try them.

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Want to stay healthy? Don't rely on vitamins

Want to stay healthy? Don't rely on vitamins | Diseases | Scoop.it
Americans spend nearly $12 billion each year on vitamin supplements, hoping they will steer us away from diseases like cancer and heart attacks. But it turns out they're just a drain on our wallets.

Via Peter Mellow
Veronika Bujok's insight:

Vitamins are a dietary supplement, but prevention is important, diet, exercise, I recommend

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, January 8, 2014 1:29 PM

Nothing better than a well-balanced meal, I say!

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Evolution of Uric Acid Metabolism in Humans - eLS - Alvarez-Lario - Wiley Online Library

Evolution of Uric Acid Metabolism in Humans - eLS - Alvarez-Lario - Wiley Online Library | Diseases | Scoop.it
Veronika Bujok's insight:

eating habits developed countries lead to many problems and disease

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The Science of Mental Illness Infographic

The Science of Mental Illness Infographic | Diseases | Scoop.it
Different chemicals have been linked to various mental disorders, and too little serotonin is associated with depression as well as as some anxiety disorders.
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