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Applying Research on Presence to Guide Online Discussions | The Sloan Consortium

Applying Research on Presence to Guide Online Discussions | The Sloan Consortium | Discussions | Scoop.it
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Reinventing class discussion online

Reinventing class discussion online | Discussions | Scoop.it
Professors find that role-playing, peer feedback and other icebreakers get students talking on the Web.
Katherine Klose's insight:

The move from classroom to online discussion, ideas from the APA.

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How to facilitate an online discussion board

A handy 1-page resource developed by Dr. Sarah Elaine Eaton for online learning students at the University of Calgary.
Katherine Klose's insight:

Excellent discussion boards on Blackboard Learn!

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Traditional in-Class Discussions

Traditional in-Class Discussions | Discussions | Scoop.it

Ad hoc class discussions can be dominated by one or a few vocal individuals to the exclusion of others.

Minority voices such as those espousing opposing views, non-mainstream points of views can easily be muffled or ignored.


Via kagendo mutua
Katherine Klose's insight:

Exactly--online discussions even the playing field and give aa voice to reluctant speakers.

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kagendo mutua's curator insight, February 7, 2013 8:28 PM

In an online discussion, everyone's voice has a fair chance for being heard.

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How to create excellent online discussion board questions - Literacy ...

How to create excellent online discussion board questions - Literacy ... | Discussions | Scoop.it
Here is a handy one-page resource on how to create questions for an online discussion board that learners find engaging and relevant.
Katherine Klose's insight:

Discussions generate community.

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Using Rubrics to Grade Online Discussions - ELC Support

Using Rubrics to Grade Online Discussions - ELC Support | Discussions | Scoop.it
Katherine Klose's insight:

Online discussions as authentic assessments--rubrics support students and instructors.

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Facilitating Online Discussions, by Donna Raleigh | TTT

Facilitating Online Discussions, by Donna Raleigh | TTT | Discussions | Scoop.it
Katherine Klose's insight:

A great starting point.

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For the Non-Believers: "There is absolutely no way online discussions can engage students as well as do face-to-face classroom Interactions!

 Anyone who thinks that online discussions cannot be engaging must not have seen a teenager text! The preference for texting over voice should be a beacon as to power of that medium to engage.

 


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kagendo mutua's curator insight, February 7, 2013 9:17 PM

Having done both the face-to-face and online discussions, I now see the level of reflexivity that goes into comments that students post online. In particular when provided clear parameters around which build their responses (e.g., citing research, drawing from personal experiences, etc)

 

Katherine Klose's comment, February 7, 2013 9:18 PM
Possibly they are even more engaging, as online discussions provide time for critical thinking and preparation before jumping into the discussion fray.
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Heutagogy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In education, heutagogy, a concept coined by Stewart Hase of Southern Cross University and Chris Kenyon in Australia, is the study of self-determined learning. The notion is an expansion and reinterpretation of andragogy, and it is possible to mistake it for the same. However, there are several differences between the two that mark one from the other.[1]

Heutagogy places specific emphasis on learning how to learn, double loop learning, universal learning opportunities, a non-linear process, and true learner self-direction. So, for example, whereas andragogy focuses on the best ways for people to learn, heutagogy also requires that educational initiatives include the improvement of people's actual learning skills themselves, learning how to learn as well as just learning a given subject itself. Similarly, whereas andragogy focuses on structured education, in heutagogy all learning contexts, both formal and informal, are considered.[1]

The word appears to come from an irregular formation of the Greek words ευρετικός (heurista) meaning to “discover,” εφευρετικός (heuretikos) meaning "inventive," εύρημα (heuriskein) meaning to "find," and άγω (ago) to "lead"; so it is construed to mean "to lead to invention, discoveries, findings" and consists of learning strategies focused on mature learners where a mentor enables quested learning to allow for modification of existing knowledge and creation of new knowledge. This is consistent with the Constructivism of Dewey, 1929, 1933/1998; Montessori, 1946; and Kolb, 1976,1984. This experiential learning through real life experience constructs and conditionalizes knowledge. This learning is problem based adaptive learning that challenges faulty schema, integrates new knowledge with existing knowledge which allows for creation of original work and innovative procedures. The learning is self-directed formation of new knowledge using Visual/Spatial, Musical/Rhythmic, Bodily Kinesthetic, Verbal/Linguistic, Logical/Mathematical, Interpersonal/Intrapersonal intelligences. The learner analyzes, conceptualizes, and synthesizes experience/prior knowledge creatively generating original work and innovative methods that results in the formation of new knowledge. Heutagogy is the highest order learning where problems are solved using Heuristic problem solving, meta-cognitive knowledge, creativity, and originality.[2]

Katherine Klose's insight:

Self-determined learning now has its own vocabulary word--heutagogy!

 

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DISCUSSION: Over-Sharing Online: Is Nothing Sacred Anymore ...

DISCUSSION: Over-Sharing Online: Is Nothing Sacred Anymore ... | Discussions | Scoop.it
On the afternoon of Feb. 6, the Twitter hashtag#30FactsAboutMe began trending. Instantly, people from across the nation joined the conversation by sharing personal details about themselves. Are we too comfortable on social ...
Katherine Klose's insight:

Students will share online, Blackboard discussion forums provide a safe place to exchange ideas.

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Online discussions

Discussions are key to building learning communities, in the classroom and beyond.

Katherine Klose's insight:

Discussions are the key

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