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Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Dropout Prevention, Poverty and Disproportionality
onto Discrimination in the Education system
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Day of the girl: innovation through education

Day of the girl: innovation through education | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it
ICT access alone won't empower girls, unless it is made part of a holistic strategy that tackles gender inequality, discrimination and poverty (Day of the girl: innovation through education | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional...

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

The idea that “knowledge is power” speaks throughout this article. In rural parts of Africa it is a struggle for girls to access things that so many of us take for granted, such as computers. “When a girl succeeds to sit at a computer…a boy will raise his voice…saying ‘why should you be holding a computer mouse when at the end of the day you will hold a baby’s napkin. ‘” According to the article three steps need to be made in order for girls to see equal rights in the education system. First, expand and extend girls connection and engagement. Secondly, increase the girl’s access to knowledge. Finally, improve governance and service delivery of these strategies.

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, October 11, 2013 6:37 PM


On December 19, 2011, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Resolution 66/170 to declare 11 October as the International Day of the Girl Child, to recognize girls’ rights and the unique challenges girls face around the world. For its second observance, this year’s Day will focus on “Innovating for Girls’ Education”

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Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Institutional Racism 323
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Why Are American Schools Still Segregated?

Why Are American Schools Still Segregated? | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it
A new study offers two answers: White people are making up a smaller percentage of the population than they used to, and different races are living in different school districts.
    

Via Thomas Faltin, Idalia Veguilla
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

Since Brown V Board of Education it was ordered that school districts needed to desegregate. However, today it seems tmany school and school districts arre going back to their old ways. Many schools have students with high poverty levels are limited to positive educational opportunites and outcomes. Many of the students in inner city schools do not have the means to go outside of their district (ie: low income, high prices in homes, etc) crippling them within their school systems. Due to these factors it continues to radically isolate and keep races imbalance between districts. This article makes readers step back and analyze segregation in their own city.

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Idalia Veguilla's curator insight, May 14, 2:55 PM

Residental racism is a problem here.  Have you every noticed schools that are located in more white neighborhoods have nicer schools and better opportunities?  This is an example of residential racism and stopping segregation in schools.

Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Institutional Racism 323
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Report: High-Achieving Minorities Drop Off in High School

Report: High-Achieving Minorities Drop Off in High School | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it
A new report from The Education Trust notes that high-achieving minorities and economically disadvantaged students suffer upon reaching high school.

Via Mel Riddile, Idalia Veguilla
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

After a recent study it is proven that “minority and economically disadvantaged students who have excelled at the elementary and junior high levels are twice as likely not to take college admission tests, and have lower grade point averages in high school.” (Green) Many reasons have been to blame for this development. One is the expectations and views that are had by the teachers. Another reason is the economical disadvantages many minorities have such as single parent households. By having single parent households, children lose the support and encouragement that many teens from two parent households thrive on.  This article proves that students that come from low income housing or single family homes have a higher fail rate. Something needs to be done to stop this cycle and promote this group of students to go to school and better themselves and their families.

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Idalia Veguilla's curator insight, May 14, 3:00 PM

Helping your family can be more important than getting an A.  Minorites are more likely to be lower income than whites.  This article discussed the differences in grades among white and black students particularly at the high school level. Sometimes working for your family to make ends meet and doing homework can be alot for a teenager.  This could be one reason for the grade disparities as mentioned in the article.  How can we fix this issue? 

Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Dropout Prevention, Poverty and Disproportionality
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Day of the girl: innovation through education

Day of the girl: innovation through education | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it
ICT access alone won't empower girls, unless it is made part of a holistic strategy that tackles gender inequality, discrimination and poverty (Day of the girl: innovation through education | Global Development Professionals Network | Guardian Professional...

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

The idea that “knowledge is power” speaks throughout this article. In rural parts of Africa it is a struggle for girls to access things that so many of us take for granted, such as computers. “When a girl succeeds to sit at a computer…a boy will raise his voice…saying ‘why should you be holding a computer mouse when at the end of the day you will hold a baby’s napkin. ‘” According to the article three steps need to be made in order for girls to see equal rights in the education system. First, expand and extend girls connection and engagement. Secondly, increase the girl’s access to knowledge. Finally, improve governance and service delivery of these strategies.

more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, October 11, 2013 6:37 PM


On December 19, 2011, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Resolution 66/170 to declare 11 October as the International Day of the Girl Child, to recognize girls’ rights and the unique challenges girls face around the world. For its second observance, this year’s Day will focus on “Innovating for Girls’ Education”

Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Brown Boys Network
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Should boys start school after girls? - China Daily

Should boys start school after girls? - China Daily | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it

China DailyShould boys start school after girls?China DailyA professor has suggested that boys should start school one or two years later than girls, which has heated up debate on tolerance and discrimination in the education system.


Via Craig Martin
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Jessica Koporetz's curator insight, May 13, 2:36 PM

A thought provoking article on the idea of boys starting school two years after girls. Modern day discrimination is happening with professors trying to hide behind science as a justification. Do we as a society believe in science in hopes that boys will excel better if they wait a year or two. Or do we, as a society stick with the idea that this action is in fact discriminating and stick to the idea of all genders starting at the same time. This article makes you question your own beliefs, as social norms.

Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Race & Ethnicity
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Race discrimination in universities still a problem, reports survey - Times Higher Education

Race discrimination in universities still a problem, reports survey - Times Higher Education | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it
Times Higher Education Race discrimination in universities still a problem, reports survey Times Higher Education According to the Race Equality Survey, undertaken by the group Black British Academics, 56 per cent reported discrimination, while...

Via Monique
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

This article enforces the idea that racial discrimination is not only a United States issue, but a global issue. Many professors in England are experiencing discrimination among their students and fellow collogues.  According to the article racism is very much apparent today due to the fact that “85 of the UK’s 18,500 professors are black, and only 17 are black women. “(Parr) Many statistics like this one, can be found in this article and are baffling. This sort of discrimination is enabling the African American community in reaching their full potential as a respectable educator.  

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Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Institutional Racism 323
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Study: Education Extends Longevity, Except for Black Males

Study: Education Extends Longevity, Except for Black Males | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it
New research on the connection between education and longevity shows substantial disparities by race and gender.

Via Ellen Diane, Idalia Veguilla
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

Researchers point to education for a longer and healthier life. Young black men that are in school are safer than they are in the streets.  They are not exposed to gang life, drugs, alcohol, etc. Instead they are focused on gaining knowledge and establishing a career.  But, the confusing statistic is the following “About 40 percent of the least-educated African American males who make it to age 25 will die before they are 65, the study found, as will 22 percent of the most-educated.  For all other groups, the chances of dying by age 65 are only 10 percent.”(Peters-Smith) Why is this number so high if they are removed from the toxic environment?  Is it because the black man is always having to prove that they are intelligent, hardworking, worthy of having a job or money for that matter?

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Connor McDade's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:50 PM

This article opens by demonstrating societal advances over the past decades, in order to demonstrate which demographics have been most limited from advancement. In the past century, life expectancies have skyrocketed due to advanced science, medicine, and nutritional knowledge. However, this life expectancy boost has been driven almost entirely by the most educated members of society. "About 40 percent of the least-educated African American males who make it to age 25 will die before they are 65, the study found, as will 22 percent of the most-educated. For all other groups, the chances of dying by age 65 are only 10 percent." The study brings attention to glaring gaps, not just in academic achievement, but also in sheer longevity and health; a relationship that cannot be ignored.

Idalia Veguilla's curator insight, May 14, 7:56 PM

Life span and education are related.  The more education someone has the more likely they are to live longer.  This makes sense considering uneducated people make unhealthy food choices.

Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Rethinking Public Education
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Are we teaching racism, sexism and Discrimination? Read this from the HuffPost

Are we teaching racism, sexism and Discrimination?  Read this from the HuffPost | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it
We Teach Racism, Sexism and Discrimination in SchoolsHuffington PostIt seems that every year another educational prophet or academic messiah comes along with the solution to all of our education and public school woes that we are supposedly facing...

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

A well written article that must be read by all those who are thinking about going into education! So many teachers always look into “how’ they are teaching. Many teachers fail to look into what they are teaching and to whom. The author made an amazing revelation that he like so many others:  “ teach white history to black kids. In addition, along with teaching racism, I teach sexism and discrimination. I do not mean for one second that I personally indoctrinate students with such vicious and hateful values, but the text book that I use (and that nearly every public school in every state uses) indirectly leads teachers into teaching students to be racist, sexist and discriminatory to their peers and other people...”(Ferroni).  Can we take a moment to pause and digest this statement…..WOW.  It is no wonder why so many minorities fail to find a solid identity or self-worth in many history classes and why so many of the majorities cut down these groups. Many white men say that black history or latino heritage month month or even classes that only focus on minority history should be adequate. But, they fail to see the larger picture. These history classes are belittling all of the other groups that helped shape and create the identity that so many countries have.   

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Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Discrimination in the Education system
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Should boys start school after girls? - China Daily

Should boys start school after girls? - China Daily | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it

China DailyShould boys start school after girls?China DailyA professor has suggested that boys should start school one or two years later than girls, which has heated up debate on tolerance and discrimination in the education system.


Via Craig Martin, Jessica Koporetz
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

A thought provoking article on the idea of boys starting school two years after girls. Modern day discrimination is happening with professors trying to hide behind science as a justification. Do we as a society believe in science in hopes that boys will excel better if they wait a year or two. Or do we, as a society stick with the idea that this action is in fact discriminating and stick to the idea of all genders starting at the same time. This article makes you question your own beliefs, as social norms.

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Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from W.E.B Dubois & Discrimination
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Paragraphs

Problems surrounding discrimination was that blacks didn’t receive the same education. Jim Crow laws had a huge impact on the south. Whites would treat blacks as secondary citizens. There would be whites lynching blacks because they couldn’t get caught. Houses were burned down and blacks were beat. There was nowhere safe for African Americans. Discrimination affected mainly blacks. In reality it affected Mexicans as well because they weren’t looked at as equal citizens. The discrimination started during slavery and still hasn’t ended. Discrimination is blinds people. They don’t know when it is here and when it goes. The problem was really around African Americans and Hispanics. The Caucasians think that they were better than any other race, but it really wasn’t true. Everybody are equal, I guess back in the early 1900’s they didn’t care.

W.E.D Dubois was an American sociologist historian, and a civil rights activist. He was a co-founder of the NAACP in 1909. He was concerned with discrimination because he believed African American’s needed the same chances for an advance education. He protested against lynching, Jim Crow laws and discrimination in education. He wrote essays exposing discrimination against blacks. Booker T Washington was the architect of the Atlanta Compromise. It was an agreement that provided that southern blacks would submit to discrimination, in exchange that northern whites invest in Southern enterprises and fund black educational charities. Dubois had different views than Washington when it came to education. Dubois believed black schools should offer liberal arts curriculum because liberal arts were required to develop leadership. Things did change thanks to the beliefs of Dubois. He encouraged blacks to strive for an education. Discrimination is still an issue in the South. There is still racism, lynching and some aspects of Jim Crow left in some states but overall, discrimination is less of in issue in other states.


Via Se'Yonna McGhee
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

Interesting paragraph/overview by pointing at the lack of equal education was one of the man problems surrounding discrimination. Although it does have a lot of great ideas and points, this paragraph lacks depth! It does not challenge my ideas, views or thinking. But this paragraph does prompt me to look into the different views between Booker T Washington and W.E.D Dubois. It also makes me question, if students were given an equal education back then, where would we be now. Great starting point in research.

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Rescooped by Jessica Koporetz from Access and Inclusion - news from around the world
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Chinese children with disabilities denied access to education

Chinese children with disabilities denied access to education | Discrimination in the Education system | Scoop.it
Maya Wang says children with disabilities are being pushed out of schools despite Chinese laws mandating universal education, and such discrimination persists through to university

Via Robbie Graham
Jessica Koporetz's insight:

It is known that for years, China has set the bar in many academic areas such as math and science. After the Great Leap Forward (1958-60) China started to narrow the social and cultural gaps between all social groups and started to take education very seriously. Soon the Ministry of Education then enforced that citizens MUST attend school for at least nine years. Today, however many universities are able to "deny entry to students with certain physical or psychological 'defects'(Wang). According to the reading it is estimated that over 83 million people live with disabilities, and at least 15 million live on less than $1 a day.  It is appalling that China is a thriving country that is known for their academic achievements, but they deny the basic rights of children due to their "defects". If a child is denied enrolment into a "mainstream" school, the families are forced to look elsewhere. The other schools may be focused on a different need, which then leaves the family at a dead end.  The Chinese government is discriminating the most vulnerable population and creating a never ending cycle for this group and making it impossible for them to better not only their families but themselves as well.This article is an eye opening read that has underlying tones of "survival of the fittest".

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