Wild Discovery
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Wild Discovery
@the frontiers of science, innovation, technology and how developments will affect the way we live
Curated by Ramy Hocson
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Soldier moves bionic arm by thoughts

Soldier moves bionic arm by thoughts | Wild Discovery | Scoop.it

A soldier injured in battle said he is determined to make a success of his new life with a bionic arm he can control with his thoughts.

Cpl Andrew Garthwaite, 26, from South Tyneside, was badly injured in Afghanistan when a Taliban grenade took off his right arm.

He is believed to be the first person in the UK to have such a bionic arm.

It involved surgery, including having his nerve system rewired, and months of learning how to use the new arm.

Cpl Garthwaite was badly injured in Helmand, Afghanistan, in September 2010 when a Taliban rocket-propelled grenade took off his right arm and killed one of his comrades.


Via Wildcat2030
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Antibacterial Power of Black Silicon

Antibacterial Power of Black Silicon | Wild Discovery | Scoop.it

"Earlier this year, we reported about a finding which revealed that physical structure of Psaltoda claripenniscicada wings can shred certain types of rod-shaped bacteria. After analyzing the surface, researchers at the Swinburne University of Technology used biomimicry to create a surface with similar properties. This nanosurface could lead to development of a new generation of nanostructured antibacterial materials. 

“Based on this discovery, we investigated other insects that may possess similar surface architectures that might kill more bacteria, in particular the deadly strains of the Staphylococcus aureus or golden staph bacterium”, said Elena Ivanova, microbiology professor at the Swinburne University of Technology. Their search led them to the wings of the Diplacodes bipunctata (Wandering Percher dragonfly), whose spike-like nanostructure destroys both rod-shaped and spherical bacteria."

 


Via Miguel Prazeres
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Waterproof Surface is 'Driest Ever'

Waterproof Surface is 'Driest Ever' | Wild Discovery | Scoop.it

"US engineers have created the "most waterproof material ever" - inspired by nasturtium leaves and butterfly wings. The new "super-hydrophobic" surface could keep clothes dry and stop aircraft engines icing over, they say."


Via Miguel Prazeres
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Startup sets sights on rapid transit Hyperloop prototype by 2015 - NBC News.com

Startup sets sights on rapid transit Hyperloop prototype by 2015 - NBC News.com | Wild Discovery | Scoop.it
Prototypes of Elon Musk's high-speed "Hyperloop" transit will be ready by 2015, according to the group taking over development of the... (Could the Hyperloop be a viable alternative to HS2?
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Tablets for Your Brain

Tablets for Your Brain | Wild Discovery | Scoop.it
Soon, we could be turning on the lights at home just by thinking about it, or sending an e-mail from our smartphone without even pulling the device from our pocket.

Via Susan Taylor
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Susan Taylor's curator insight, October 31, 2013 8:01 PM

Want to turn on the lights in your dining room?  Just think about it.  Want to send a text from your smartphone? Just say the words in your head.  "Soon, we might interact with our smartphones and computers simply by using our minds."

 

This technology -- called brain computer interface -- was initially developed to help people with paralysis.  But before long, this technology could be in consumers' hands as well.

 

Wait!  This feels a bit familiar.  Where are you...WALL-E?

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Makers: Separating Fact from Fiction

Makers: Separating Fact from Fiction | Wild Discovery | Scoop.it

Once upon a time not so long ago, computer programmers wore starched white shirts and stodgy ties, and worked in immaculate corporate spaces with giant machines called ENIAC and Colossus. But the anarchic, transformative power of these tools was too great to be constrained by the corporate world, and a generation of hippie hackers with names like Jobs, Wozniak and Gates threw off their ties and sparked an information revolution from their California garages. It’s a story we know well, but it’s also one we’re about to see retold in the field of manufacturing. Additive manufacturing, digital fabrication – however we choose to label it, the radical shift in “making” has broken the old model of assembly lines, of hierarchical shiftwork and production, and even of factories themselves. Ladies and gentlemen, manufacturing has – quite literally – left the building.

 


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The Innovation of Loneliness

What is the connection between Social Networks and Being Lonely? Quoting the words of Sherry Turkle from her TED talk - Connected, But Alone.
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Hive minds: How 'swarm robots' are learning from insects

Hive minds: How 'swarm robots' are learning from insects | Wild Discovery | Scoop.it
In the dystopian future imagined within the popular Terminator franchise, robots learn to think, self-replicate and eventually kill their human masters.
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The Future of 3D Printing

The Future of 3D Printing | Wild Discovery | Scoop.it
I have been writing about 3D Printing (also called Additive Manufacturing) for over 20 years. At first the technology was used for rapid prototyping. Over the past few years, however, rapid advances

Via David Ednie, David Hain
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David Ednie's curator insight, November 1, 2013 5:40 AM

Rapid prototyping today -> human body replacement parts tomorrow

David Hain's curator insight, November 1, 2013 6:03 AM

We are only limited by our imagination - technology is here already...