Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan
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Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan
Educators help students recognize and understand the nuances of a discipline by using strategies that “make their thinking visible.” They promote classroom reading, writing, listening, speaking and critical thinking using authentic materials that support the development of content-specific knowledge and that transfer to real world situations.They guide students through these complex texts by using strategies that develop conceptual understanding of language and set expectations for relevant application of skills. This site includes resources of all kinds, including content knowledge resources, that lead to deeper disciplinary learning.
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ASCD Express 11.20 - A Road Map for Creative Instruction

ASCD Express 11.20 - A Road Map for Creative Instruction | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Students who learn in a creative environment, are exposed to creative activities and assignments, and observe their teacher modeling creative thinking will become more creative thinkers (Sternberg & Williams, 1996). A creative learning environment that embraces students and engagement along with critical thinking and creative thinking skills is essential to student achievement (Boykin & Noguera, 2011, 2012; Marks, 2000, as cited in Jensen, 2013). To plan the instruction that matches your creativity nurturing classroom enviornment, first identify the nonnegotiables. The nonnegotiables consist of the curricular standards, the required content, and the skills that are the target of a lesson (Drapeau, 2004). Then, choose one of four roads on the Creativity Road Map or combine roads to intentionally integrate creative instruction with content.

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Susannah Wood's curator insight, June 23, 7:31 PM
While not specific to gifted students, I really liked this. Something to keep in mind even for classroom guidance lessons!
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How Neanderthal DNA Helps Humanity: A Map of Ancient Genes

How Neanderthal DNA Helps Humanity: A Map of Ancient Genes | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

Neanderthals and Denisovans would have been a good source of helpful DNA for our ancestors. They had lived in Europe and Asia for hundreds of thousands of years — enough time to adjust to the cold climate, weak sun and local microbes. “What better way to quickly adapt than to pick up a gene variant from a population that had probably already been there for 300,000 years?” Akey said. Indeed, the Neanderthal and Denisovan genes with the greatest signs of selection in the modern human genome “largely have to do with how humans interact with the environment,” he said.

 

To find these adaptive segments, scientists search the genomes of contemporary humans for regions of archaic DNA that are either more common or longer than expected. Over time, useless pieces of Neanderthal DNA — those that don’t help the carrier — are likely to be lost. And long sections of archaic DNA are likely to be split into smaller segments unless there is selective pressure to keep them intact.

 

In 2014, two groups, one led by Akey and the other by David Reich, a geneticist at Harvard Medical School, independently published genetic maps that charted where in our genomes Neanderthal DNA is most likely to be found. To Akey’s surprise, both maps found that the most common adaptive Neanderthal-derived genes are those linked to skin and hair growth. One of the most striking examples is a gene called BNC2, which is linked to skin pigmentation and freckling in Europeans. Nearly 70 percent of Europeans carry the Neanderthal version.

 

Scientists surmise that BNC2 and other skin genes helped modern humans adapt to northern climates, but it’s not clear exactly how. Skin can have many functions, any one of which might have been helpful. “Maybe skin pigmentation, or wound healing, or pathogen defense, or how much water loss you have in an environment, making you more or less susceptible to dehydration,” Akey said. “So many potential things could be driving this — we don’t know what differences were most important.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas

A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Download a PDF of "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" by the National Research Council for free. Description: Science, engineering, and technology permeate nearly every facet of modern life and hold the key to solving many of humanity's most pressing current and future challenges. The United States' position in the global economy is declining, in part because U.S. workers lack fundamental knowledge in these fields. To address the critical issues of U.S. competitiveness and to better prepare the workforce, A Framework for K-12 Science Education proposes a new approach to K-12 science education that will capture students' interest and provide them with the necessary foundational knowledge in the field.

A Framework for K-12 Science Education outlines a broad set of expectations for students in science and engineering in grades K-12. These expectations will inform the development of new standards for K-12 science education and, subsequently, revisions to curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development for educators. This book identifies three dimensions that convey the core ideas and practices around which science and engineering education in these grades should be built. These three dimensions are: crosscutting concepts that unify the study of science through their common application across science and engineering; scientific and engineering practices; and disciplinary core ideas in the physical sciences, life sciences, and earth and space sciences and for engineering, technology, and the applications of science. The overarching goal is for all high school graduates to have sufficient knowledge of science and engineering to engage in public discussions on science-related issues, be careful consumers of scientific and technical information, and enter the careers of their choice.

A Framework for K-12 Science Education is the first step in a process that can inform state-level decisions and achieve a research-grounded basis for improving science instruction and learning across the country. The book will guide standards developers, teachers, curriculum designers, assessment developers, state and district science administrators, and educators who teach science in informal environments.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Write for HistoryNet

Write for HistoryNet | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Have something compelling to say? Looking to get published? Let us know! HistoryNet is the world’s largest history publisher and an ideal place for aspiring journalists and history enthusiasts to get published. With 2+ million monthly readers we are actively seeking new grassroots content contributors for a wide variety of topics and periods in history – anything from the ancient pyramids to the cold war.

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Share-Outs: Critiquing & Revising Models

Share-Outs: Critiquing & Revising Models | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Explore a technique that allows students to learn from each other. With share-outs, students share their scientific models and get feedback to use to revise their models.
Via Cindy Riley Klages
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Science learning games for kids

Science learning games for kids | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

"List of science learning games categorized in various age groups to teach science in a fun and an engaging manner ..."


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Lacey Mack's curator insight, May 28, 10:05 PM
Engagement reward system that is relevant to curriculum
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4 Great Websites That Provide Free Educational Documentaries for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

4 Great Websites That Provide Free Educational Documentaries for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

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Low-Stakes Writing: Writing to Learn, Not Learning to Write

Low-Stakes Writing: Writing to Learn, Not Learning to Write | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
University Park Campus School uses low-stakes writing to scaffold instruction, develop student voice, and foster critical thinkers.
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STEM and Writing: A Super Combination - Edutopia

STEM and Writing: A Super Combination - Edutopia | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

"I brought a superhero into my classroom the other day. He wasn't wearing a cape. He didn't have an alias. But he had the greatest superpower of all: inspiration.

When you teach using project-based learning (PBL), one brings outside expertise into the classroom. My eighth graders begin the year creating science fiction based origin stories for original superhero characters as an introduction to a greater advocacy unit. Therefore, it seemed natural to bring in an actual scientist. Which brought me to CalTech and Dr. Spyridon Michalakis."


Via John Evans, Suvi Salo, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Stephania Savva, Jim Lerman
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Advancing STEM Learning for All: Sharing cutting edge work and community discourse

Join us at http://stemforall2016.videohall.com! On May 17th – 23rd, 2016, more than 150 projects will showcase three-minute videos of their innovative work…

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Helen Teague's curator insight, May 13, 11:46 PM
2016 Video Showcase – Advancing STEM for All May 17-23, 2016 (online) Join us next week for the 2nd annual video showcase! This interactive, online event features more than 400 presenters and co-presenters who have submitted 156 videos on STEM education research & development. Visit the showcase to view, comment, and cast your vote for your favorite videos and projects. All projects featured in the 3-minute videos were funded by NSF and represent cutting-edge research and development in STEM and computer science education.
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20 STEM Activities Inspired by Kids Movies

20 STEM Activities Inspired by Kids Movies | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Explore some science & engineering with these awesome activities inspired by movies kids love!

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Books Set at Pivotal Turning Points in History | Read It Forward

Books Set at Pivotal Turning Points in History | Read It Forward | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
The best way to make the vastness of history come alive is to create (or reimagine) compelling characters at key points in history. The world changes in each of these books: a country sees devastating losses in war and disasters; laws and customs evolve; illness, violence, or revolution reshape physical and cultural spaces. Even though these books are based around major happenings, their impact is not measured just by how accurately they portray history; their protagonists, average people caught in impossible situations, embody that change and transformation.

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Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, March 21, 2:13 PM
What books have made history come alive for you? I remember Anderson's "Fever," pictured here, and also "In the Heart of the Sea" and "Devil in the White City."
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Literacy in the Digital Age: Five Sites With High-Quality Informational Text

Literacy in the Digital Age: Five Sites With High-Quality Informational Text | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Engage your students with high-quality informational text that allows them to explore their own interests. Natalie Franzi and Steve Figurelli share five fabulous websites.

Via Mel Riddile, Les Howard
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Top STEAM tools for Online and Offline Learning: Part 2 - Daily Genius

Top STEAM tools for Online and Offline Learning: Part 2 - Daily Genius | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Last week, we looked at some of the top STEAM tools for online and offline learning by exploring web-based platforms and unplugged lessons and board games. With President Obama’s recent initiative to bring computer science to K-12 education and make computer programming a basic skill for all students, many of you will be on the lookout for new and interesting ways to bring these STEAM tools to your classrooms. This week, we’ll look at two new categories of tools, robots, and microcomputers and microcontrollers.

Via John Evans, Dean J. Fusto, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Britain's Oldest Handwritten Document Discovered

Britain's Oldest Handwritten Document Discovered | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
An excavation in London has revealed over 400 wooden Roman tablets that include the first reference to London, evidence of schooling via the alphabet, and the "earliest intrinsically-dated document" discovered in the UK. The latter, which is a financial document and can be seen above, dates t

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Top STEAM tools for Online and Offline Learning: Part 1 - Daily Genius

Top STEAM tools for Online and Offline Learning: Part 1 - Daily Genius | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
A few months ago, the President of the United States, Barack Obama, announced a bold new initiative that aims to bring computer science to K-12 education and make computer programming a basic skill for all students.  The implications of this development can be staggering: STEAM will become much more widespread.  Soon, teachers around the country will teach students computational thinking, looping, conditional statements, and other high order programming concepts.

There are several tools and platforms teachers can use to accomplish this goal.  These tools range from web platforms, to robots, to manipulatives teachers can use to teach coding.  Some are more powerful than others, and offer different gains, expertise, and rewards, but they all have a place in the classroom. 

Via John Evans
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Story Collider - Stories about Science

Story Collider - Stories about Science | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it


"The Story Collider was founded in 2010 by Ben Lillie and Brian Wecht, two physicists who met at a storytelling show in Queens and quickly realized that they could do that too. Since then, The Story Collider has been bringing true, personal stories about science to life both through our many live shows as well as our weekly podcast, and we've used what we've learned about science and stories to teach scientists to use narrative in our university and corporate workshop program.

 

"We believe that, now, more than ever, science is a part of everyone's life. At The Story Collider, you'll hear from scientists about all the times things went wrong, and occasionally right, in their labs, but you'll also hear from people who haven't had a formal connection to science since high school. We have physicists, comedians, neuroscientists, writers, actors, doctors, and many, many more telling their story. Some are heartbreaking; some are hilarious. They're all true, and all, in one way or another, are about science."


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Fourteen books that connect students with valuable scientists’ struggles

Fourteen books that connect students with valuable scientists’ struggles | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

"A study found that students who read about famous scientists' personal and intellectual struggles do better in their science classes. Librarians helped us put ..."


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6 Technology Integration Ideas For Any Content Area And Grade Level - TeachThought

6 Technology Integration Ideas For Any Content Area And Grade Level - TeachThought | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Declining attention span as a result of increasing use of smartphones and social media are just a few challenges teachers deal with in the modern classroom.

Children today deal with more stimuli around them than ever before. Mobile phones, tablets,and other technology have become so intertwined with our children’s daily lives that it’s hard to imagine keeping it out of the classroom. Even though some believe these can be distractions, embracing technology can make learning more fun and impactful.

Smartphones, iPads and other devices have become so intuitive for kids, it only makes sense to harness these powerful learning tools to engage a classroom full of tech-savvy students. And the best part? You can use these ideas in one form or another for any student in any content area and grade level.

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Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 11, 2:53 PM
A couple of these activities should motivate the tech savvy students of today.
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Here Is A Superb New Google App for Science Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Here Is A Superb New Google App for Science Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it

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Could Storytelling Be the Secret Sauce to STEM Education?

Could Storytelling Be the Secret Sauce to STEM Education? | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
By exploring stories, learners can acquire a deeper understanding and appreciation of STEM.

Via Darlene Clapham K12, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Stephania Savva, Jim Lerman
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5 ways to interest more girls (and boys) in science

5 ways to interest more girls (and boys) in science | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
Technology News & Innovation in K-12 Education

Via Anna Hu , Dean J. Fusto
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Anna Hu 's curator insight, May 13, 10:21 AM
With all the hype about STEM in K-12 focusing on how to engage students is a must.
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Geo-Literacy Projects Build Students' Understanding of Our Complex World

Geo-Literacy Projects Build Students' Understanding of Our Complex World | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
If interdisciplinary project-based learning is a goal for you and your students this school year, you might want to start with questions that put a premium on place. For example: Where are bicycle accidents most likely to happen in your community? Where's the best spot to watch for migrating Monarch butterflies? What's the safest evacuation route in the event of a natural disaster? How have the neighborhoods of New Orleans changed after Hurricane Katrina?

To investigate such questions, students would need to gather and analyze data, look for patterns, think critically, and communicate their understanding with maps and other visual aids. In the process, they would also make connections across content areas and deepen their geo-literacy skills.

Via Kim Flintoff
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A Literary History of Presidential Underdogs and Dark Horses

A Literary History of Presidential Underdogs and Dark Horses | Disciplinary Literacy in Michigan | Scoop.it
These 6 books will give you all you need to know about America's history of unexpected presidential candidates, à la Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump.
Via Mary Daniels Brown
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