Disaster Changes - Stage Two
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Mike's Bulldozer and the Big Flood

Mike's Bulldozer and the Big Flood | Disaster Changes - Stage Two | Scoop.it
Emma Florence Holt's insight:

A students understanding of environmental changes can be enhanced through the use of quality resources such as a picture book. Mike’s Bulldozer and the Big Flood by Nan Bodsworth is a rich text combining a simple story and detailed images highlighting the process of how to address the issue of flooding in regional Australia. This could be used effectively as a resource at the commencement on a unit regarding environmental changes as it encapsulates key components of how individuals, families and communities address the natural disaster, flooding.

 

The constructivist theory advocates that learning is derived from prior knowledge. This means that schema, organised information about a particular subject matter, can ‘enable us to construct meaning based on what we already know and what we expect to happen given our knowledge about the world,’ (Schraw, 2006, p. 248). Discovering students knowledge using this resource could be executed through a think and match activity. The teacher could make photocopies of each page without words. Before the students have read the story they will be asked to place the sequences of events in order. This will occur in groups of 4-5 students. The students then have to justify to the class their sequence of events before, during and after a flood. From a pedagogical standpoint ‘representing findings through visual organisation, symbols and oral and written language, allows students to think about information in a variety of ways and caters for a variety of learning preferences,’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2012, p. 114). The result of this process is twofold. Firstly students prior knowledge is revealed and secondly it caters a variety of learning approaches.

 

Quality resources provide links to alternate key learning areas. A literacy strategy that could be undertaken using this resource at the beginning of a unit about environmental changes is a ‘see, think, wonder’ thinking routine. Multimodal texts utilise illustrations to create a sub storyline because ‘the visual and verbal texts construct meaning on two levels, through their synchronicity and interaction,’ (Australian Curriculum: English, 2013, p. 1). This can be used to further reiterate a student’s understanding of natural disasters as it creates a multifaceted story. The teacher could show the students the double page spread on page twenty two and twenty three. The children will say what they see, what they are thinking and questions about the picture. For example ‘I see a man driving a bulldozer, I think he is moving sand, I wonder why he has to move the sand?’ This would enhance a teacher’s understanding of student’s prior knowledge of the topic. It also engages students in critical literacy as these ‘activities help students analyse and deconstruct the texts used in the collection of data,’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2012, p. 114) by enabling them to ‘read’ the pictures. This enhances their overall understanding of natural disasters, in this case floods, as well as gives the teacher an indication of the overall knowledge for the students surrounding environmental changes. 

 

References

 

Australian Curriculum: English. (2013). Viewing and reading picture books. Canberra: Author. 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning 

 

Schraw, G. (2006). Knowledge structures and processes. In P. A. Alexander & P. H. Winne (Eds.), Handbook of educational psychology (2nd Ed). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

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Stop Disasters

Stop Disasters | Disaster Changes - Stage Two | Scoop.it
Emma Florence Holt's insight:

A global perspective is imperative in order for students to gain a full perspective of environmental changes, specifically natural disasters. The premise of the Australian Government Global Education website initiative is based upon the necessity to facilitate a broader scope of perspectives on global issues. As the website itself advocates it contains ‘teacher resources to encourage a global perspective across the curriculum,’ (Australian Government Global Education, 2012, p. 1). In order for this to occur teachers need to firstly understand the importance of teaching global perspectives. The website contains these justifications for example ‘an opportunity to develop positive and responsible values and attitudes, important skills and an orientation to active participation,’ (Australian Government Global Education, 2012, p. 1). This propels its usefulness as a resource for teaching HSIE through its clear validation of the importance of global perspectives. This in turn provides a reference point for teachers when formulating approaches to incorporate a global perspective into their HSIE lessons.

 

The HSIE curriculum document reinforces the importance of using online resources. It states ‘the world wide web, for example, enables students to... access commentary on local, national and global events, and to share the design of projects with students in other places and participate in group action,’ (Board of Studies, 1998, p. 6). The website has a myriad of resources regarding a plethora of global issues. Specifically focussing on environmental changes the ‘Stop Disasters’ game reinforces these disasters are global issues that can be addressed effectively on a local scale. This game could be used as a whole class activity to further a student’s understanding of the communal preparation needed for natural disasters such as flooding and tsunamis. Students could play the game after collaboratively brainstorming methods a community could use to prepare for natural disasters. This activity could be used after undertaking the activities associated with the ‘Fire Zone Kids’ resource. This incorporation of disaster awareness is crucial in primary school as Vunileba espouses ‘children were the primary vehicle for change in society because they bring a culture of risk reduction, a culture of preparedness, a culture of resilience in our community,’ (Vunileba, 2006, p. 5). Therefore the Stop Disasters game and Global Education website is a key learning tool to be accessed by teachers to build a culture of disaster awareness incorporating global perspectives under the notion of environmental changes. 

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney:B.O.S.  Retrieved

from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/

 

Global Education (2012). Why Adopt a Global Perspective? Retrieved March 23, 2013 from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-and-learning/australian-curriculum.html

 

Vunileba, A. (2006, October 11). Disaster awareness effort targets students. The Fiji Times, p. 5.

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Emergency Kits

Emergency Kits | Disaster Changes - Stage Two | Scoop.it
Emma Florence Holt's insight:

The State Emergency Services (SES) lesson plan provides teachers with a comprehensive scaffold to teach important issues associated with natural disasters. Lesson Plan 3B focuses on Emergency Kits aimed at Stage Two to early Stage Three students. The teaching resource can be found through the Australian Council of Emergency Services Website via the links to ‘Lil Larrakins School Resource Kits’. This resource includes a clear lesson outcome and provides external digital links specific to each state in Australia to enhance the applicability of the resource to individual classrooms across the country.

 

Effective teaching resources provide scope for insightful assessment. This resource could be utilised as an assessment task to comprehend a student’s ability to process and apply information surrounding emergency kits. The assessment could occur after the lesson outlined in the resource is completed successfully. This is because it is important that assessment practice involves ‘using the knowledge, processes and skills of the subject in ways which require judgment, solving problems, and generating ideas that go beyond the information they have been given,’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2012, p. 126).  This could occur through students applying learnt knowledge about the components of emergency kits to the worksheet provided in the resource itself. This teaching resource also provides scope to assess a student’s ability to think critically about people's needs when facing natural disasters. This occurs through students providing five other items that may be needed in an emergency kit during a natural disaster. This reiterates Crooks' notion of assessment that surmises ‘any evaluation must emphasise student’s competence and potential for learning growth,’ (Crooks, 1998, p. 232). Therefore through this evaluative process the teacher will be able to gauge a student's comprehension of the use of emergency kits as well as their ability to engage in creative evaluation about how this concepts links to preparing for and coping with natural disasters.

 

Useful teaching resources such as the SES lesson plan create scope for curriculum cross over. A mathematics activity could involve students creating and budgeting for their own natural disaster emergency kit. The students could be provided with a list of items and their prices with a maximum total of money they can spend to create their own emergency kit. The students then have to prioritise and purchase specific items to add to their own emergency kit from the list. This activity is relevant because it is important to incorporate the 'effective use of mathematics to meet the general demands of everyday life,’ (Bobis, Lowrie & Mulligan, 2010, p. 6). This would involve practical skills such as budgeting and prioritisation of items as well as confirming their understanding of the items needed in an emergency kit. Therefore by effectively utilising a comprehensive teaching resource such as the SES lesson plan curriculum cross over can be achieved effectively. 

 

References

 

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2013). (4th Edition). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically. Sydney: Pearson Education.

 

Crooks, T.J. (1988). The Impact of Classroom Evaluation Practices on Students. Review of Educational Research, 58, 438-481. 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning 

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Tiddalick the Frog - Aboriginal Dreamtime Story - YouTube

Tiddalick the Frog is an Aboriginal Dreamtime Story from the Murray River Region of New South Wales, Australia. Aboriginals believe in two forms of time; two...
Emma Florence Holt's insight:

Tidallick the Frog is an Aboriginal dreamtime story told by an Indigenous elder highlighting the ramifications of environmental changes in Australia, specifically drought and flooding. The video integrates still visual images to illustrate the story coupled with a voice over. This enhances the modality of the resource as ‘multimodal texts make meaning because all the elements work together to create a whole text,’ (Callow, 2011, p. 181). The story is told from the perspective of an Indigenous elder. This enhances its ability to provide an Indigenous perspective on natural disasters as it is ‘through narrative which provide data about the film-maker’s understandings of humans and human interactions,’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2012, p. 113) i.e. with the environment. As a result of the construction of the resource it enables Stage Two students to work towards the Stage Three ENS3.6 Relationships with Places outcome which states a student ‘explains how various beliefs and practices influence the ways in which people interact with, change and value their environment,’ (Board of Studies, 1998, p. 33). These elements of the resource marry together to reinforce varied perspectives and interpretations of natural disasters and environmental changes through an Indigenous perspective.

 

Indigenous perspectives provide insight into Australian environmental changes through expanding knowledge of various consequences. An activity that could be undertaken would be to create a consequence wheel as a class and then in groups. The aim of this activity would be to critically analyse ramifications caused by natural disasters after watching the YouTube video. The teacher would use one of the implications highlighted in the YouTube video as a starting point to model a consequence wheel which would enable ‘students to evaluate and reflect on a given situation or potential action and inform their own decision making and choices,’ (Education for Sustainability, 2014, p. 1). Students could then be divided into groups of 4-5 and each given an animal named in the story. Students could then create their own consequence wheel to suggest ways in which the local community could be affected by drought whilst also focussing on potential national and global consequences. This would enable students to view the issue of drought as not just a local Australian issue but also one with global consequences. It would place emphasis on the value of Indigenous perspectives to further understand Australian environmental changes.

 

Cross curriculum activities can occur effectively through utilising Indigenous perspectives. A literacy activity that could be completed would be analysing the textual features of oral story telling. This could occur by providing students with an example of the table below. Students then deconstruct the literary techniques in each one-minute segment of the YouTube video. This would highlight the importance of oral story telling and specific techniques used in this narrative form. This is because ‘it is clear that there is an interrelationship between the skills of talking, listening, reading and writing,’ (Rushton, 2010, p. 10). Therefore by utilising a textual form incorporating an Indigenous perspective students understanding of natural disasters and features of different textual forms is enhanced.  

 

Time period                    Description                   Language/Features

 

0 – 1 minute                    Introduction                 Written text

                                                                                  Verbs

                                                                                  Modulated tone

 

1 – 2 minutes

2 – 3 minutes

3 – 4 minutes

4 – 5 minutes

5 – 6 minutes

6 – 7 minutes

 

 

References 

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney:B.O.S.  Retrieved

from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/ 

 

Callow, J. (2011). When image and text meet - teaching with visual and multimodal texts. PETA Paper 181 (Primary English Teaching Association Australia.).

 

Education for Sustainability (2014). Consequence Wheel. Retrieved April 2, 2014 from http://efs.tki.org.nz/Curriculum-resources-and-tools/Consequence-Wheel

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning 

 

Rushton, K. (2010) e:update 010 Teaching grammar in the context of narrative. Newtown: Primary English Teaching Association

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Behind the News - 03/03/2009: Fire Zone Kids

Behind the News - 03/03/2009: Fire Zone Kids | Disaster Changes - Stage Two | Scoop.it
In Victoria theyre still dealing with bushfires But in the areas burnt out three weeks ago families have begun the long process of getting back to normal Sarah has been to the area to find out how
Emma Florence Holt's insight:

The Behind The News report ‘Fire Zone Kids’ humanises the concept of natural disasters. This magnifies the importance of disaster response and the impact caused by environmental changes. It also allows students to critically analyse how a community can respond to a natural disaster as well as the ramifications for families post disasters. Other teaching resources and videos reflecting environmental changes can be found on the Behind The News website under the topic ‘natural disasters’.

 

Comprehensive resources enrich HSIE teaching activities incorporating other curriculum areas. A teaching idea would be to allow students to watch the whole video and then respond with a class hot seat. In this activity students play the role of one of the ‘Fire Zone Kids’ and discuss some of their experiences when dealing with the natural disaster of bushfire. This activity crosses into the Stage Two component of the Creative Arts syllabus which states in its content overview that it is important to ‘provide opportunities for students to make artworks about real experiences that are natural and imagined and that are of interest to them (eg events, incidents, places and spaces,’ (Board of Studies, 2007, p. 51). This reiterates Swartz notion stating that it is important to ‘emphasize teaching children in a variety of ways, using the arts to reinforce academics, and encouraging each child's unique talents to improve their learning,’ (Swartz, 2005, p. 2). Therefore by allowing students to creatively express their ideas about topical issues such as natural disasters, enriches the students learning a topic. This also provides scope for an integration of key learning areas into HSIE activities.

 

Assessment tasks can effectively integrate other curriculum areas when choosing suitable resources for HSIE lessons. An assessment that could be undertaken using this resource would be to write a persuasive letter to the government advocating for more aid to be provided to families who have lost their homes from bush fires. This would cross into the English syllabus that states a student ‘responds to and composes a range of texts that express viewpoints of the world similar to and different from their own EN2-11D,’ (Australian Curriculum: English, 2012, p. 1). This would require students to use formal and persuasive language and structure their writing to the letter format. This assessment should utilise descriptive pedagogy which requires teachers to ‘make explicit what qualities need to be demonstrated in students’ work,’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2012, p. 128). This would include discussing the assessment guidelines with the students and including ‘a set of criteria, dimensions or characteristics which identify what is to be assessed, and what will be looked for in student work,’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2012, p. 128). An example of some of these characteristics could include:

-      Use of persuasive language

-      Identification of consequences 

-      Adherence to letter format

This assessment practice would enable a teacher to assess the students' ability to process ramifications post a natural disaster and pursuasively articulate reasons to increase government aid. Therefore indicating their comprehension of the complexities of post disaster recovery. 

 

References 

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (2012). Australian Curriculum: English: Foundation to Year 10. Sydney: Author. 

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Creative Arts: K-6: Syllabus. Sydney: Author. 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2012). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning 

 

Schratz, D. (2005, July 20). Learning through art. Tribune, P. 2.

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