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137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art

137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art | Diplomat Cartography | Scoop.it
The Bay Area's Jenny Odell creates maddeningly complex sets of similar structures, like stadiums, nuclear plants and cargo ships.

Via Seth Dixon, Jérémie Ory
Sean de Basti's insight:

do you know where everything is located?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 2013 10:57 PM

I love geographically inspired art.  How many of the 137 icon features (as portrayed in Google Maps but removed from their context) can you identify?  For a higher-resolution, image and more of her art, click here


Tags: mapping, art, google, trivia.

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Parallel Projected 3D Maps | Geographx

Parallel Projected 3D Maps | Geographx | Diplomat Cartography | Scoop.it
" Parallel Projected 3D Maps 3D perspective maps have issues because they have convergent projection lines and fixed viewpoints. So why not make 3D maps with parallel projection lines and a viewpoint at infinity? The Plan Oblique projection does just that. So does the Orthographic Oblique projection which is a derivative of the Plan Oblique. We generally prefer the Orthographic Oblique projection because the view appears more natural. Both have parallel projection lines, a viewpoint at infinity, and both are largely free of the issues associated with perspective 3D maps "
Via Charlotte Hoarau
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Rescooped by Sean de Basti from Map@Print
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137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art

137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art | Diplomat Cartography | Scoop.it
The Bay Area's Jenny Odell creates maddeningly complex sets of similar structures, like stadiums, nuclear plants and cargo ships.

Via Seth Dixon, Jérémie Ory
Sean de Basti's insight:

do you know where everything is located?

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 10, 2013 10:57 PM

I love geographically inspired art.  How many of the 137 icon features (as portrayed in Google Maps but removed from their context) can you identify?  For a higher-resolution, image and more of her art, click here


Tags: mapping, art, google, trivia.

Rescooped by Sean de Basti from A Geography Scrapbook
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Warum Karten immer politisch sind – Kritische Kartographie bei „The West Wing“

Warum Karten immer politisch sind – Kritische Kartographie bei „The West Wing“ | Diplomat Cartography | Scoop.it
Die US-Drama Serie „The West Wing“ setzt sich mit dem Regierungsalltag im Weißen Haus auseinander. In diesem „Zentrum der Macht“ (so der Titel in der deutschen Übersetzung) bleiben gelegentliche Au...

Via geofoodgraz
Sean de Basti's insight:

Sometimes its really critical!

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Create Professional Interactive Maps for Your Website or App with MapBox

Create Professional Interactive Maps for Your Website or App with MapBox | Diplomat Cartography | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Sean de Basti's insight:

MapBox combines his own online hosting service with his desktop software TileMill to a very good opportunity for publishing maps!

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corneja's curator insight, February 16, 2013 7:06 PM

Very useful app. Thanks. I will share it.

Robin Martin's comment, April 30, 2013 3:00 PM
Thanks again Robin! ~ Robin
Nedko Aldev's curator insight, May 8, 2013 3:26 AM

add your insight...

 
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"Top 100 Geospatial Influencers": a critical map view

"Top 100 Geospatial Influencers": a critical map view | Diplomat Cartography | Scoop.it

A short time of my day I am watching twitter like others are zapping the TV. A short time ago, there was this list out of nowhere: "the 100 most influencial geospatial people" which was published b...


Via Mark P
Sean de Basti's insight:

Interesting geospatialists which are influencers by twitter

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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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Seven Alternatives to the Google Maps API | .net magazine

Seven Alternatives to the Google Maps API | .net magazine | Diplomat Cartography | Scoop.it
Even free alternatives to Google's mapping API provide significant advantages.

  In fact, many of these alternatives have advantages over Google Maps beyond being cheaper (or free). Even if you are a small enough user of Google Maps that you wouldn't have to pay (you average less than 25,000 map views a day), it is worth your while to look at the alternatives.

  This article assumes that you are a user of Google's JavaScript map API. But even if you know nothing about JavaScript and just want to embed a simple map on your website, there are alternatives. Mapbox Embed is an alternative to embeding a Google Map on a webpage, in case you don't like the idea of Google placing ads on your map.

http://mapbox.com/hosting/embedding/

 

  Google Maps, of course, is still the 800-pound gorilla of mapping APIs. Google provides advanced features: powerful routing (including for walking, bicycling, and transit), street view, 3D buildings, weather, and traffic information. And the company isn't resting on its laurels, with a new Google Earth view and an experimental MapGL interface. Some of these features are unique to Google, so (depending on your application) you might have no choice but to use its API.

https://developers.google.com/maps/

  A big problem with Google is that you have little or no control. Indeed, a few years ago Google switched its Map API from V2 to V3. V3 was incompatible with V2, and Google deprecated V2 even before V3 was feature complete, causing problems for many users.

 

http://microsoft.com/maps/developers/web.aspx

  Microsoft has positioned Bing maps as an alternative to Google maps, especially for providing local information. A unique feature of Bing maps is their 'bird's eye' view, which gives aerial views from several perspective angles.

  Free accounts for Bing maps limit you to 125K sessions or 500K transactions per year. Free accounts do not include 'bird's eye' or 'streetside' (streetview) maps. They also have educational and not-for-profit accounts, which do include free access to Streetside maps.

 

http://developer.nokia.com/Develop/Maps

  Nokia purchased Navteq (one of the major suppliers of map data) in 2007, and has been powering Yahoo maps since 2011. Not surprisingly, Nokia is largely focused on maps for mobile applications, although it does provide APIs for conventional browsers as well.

  Currently, a free maps API account has a monthly limit of one million map views, which is slightly higher than the Google limit (750K / month). It also limits you to 500K searches and 500K routes per month.

 

http://developer.mapquest.com

  MapQuest was one of the first providers for maps on the web, and today it's encouraging the transition to open maps. MapQuest is the only company that lets you choose between using licensed maps or open maps. Even using licensed map data, it has free accounts with no limits on map views. However, it does limit you to 5K calls per day for routing (including for multiple destinations), geocoding, and search.

  The open map option – which uses OpenStreetMap and free satellite and aerial data – has no limits at all, but does not provide routing or traffic services. Unlike most non-open-source APIs, the open map option can be used for paid (non-public or password-protected) applications.

 

http://openlayers.org

  The OpenLayers API is a project of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation, and is often used with OpenStreetMap maps and data. It is a very flexible and powerful API designed to be used in advanced mapping applications, but it is somewhat complicated and large. It is a mature API with lots of features, but it can be difficult to use in mobile applications since it was designed before they became popular.


Via David Anders
Sean de Basti's insight:

Very very interesting - Openlayers has a useful API which is combined with GeoServer and Joomla a good workflow to start with WMS

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Patrick Jean Uses Google Maps for Short, Effective Short Film Commenting on Oil Dependency (02:46)

Posted by Sarv Taghavian on March 28, 2013 • 

 

"Patrick Jean's short film "Motorville" (his follow-up to his 2010 success story "Pixels") uses Google Maps' familiar interface to tell a clever story about oil dependency.

Jean tells Fast Company's Co.Create, "The challenge was simply to animate a modern megalopolis living on a map--like massive, living organisms feeding from oil. But the problem is these organisms are not farsighted enough to achieve their own survival in the long term, because they consume all the resources around them."

...

 

Read more on CreativePlanetNetwork.com


Via Thierry Saint-Paul
Sean de Basti's insight:

Interesting for what google is useful :)

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