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digitalNow
Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
Curated by Don Dea
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Two Types of Marketers: Upstream and Downstream

1) Downstream Marketers
This style of marketer is most common. They are often marketing products which are handed to them from product teams, or remote engineering teams, even abroad in other countries. They often have little say over what they will market, and are often measured on transactional measurements, often signups, leads, or total sales. The downside for this marketer is they are often non-strategic, and focused on marketing tactics, but the upside is they’re role is often safe and secure for the short term.

2) Upstream Marketers
This role is less common, but often found if there’s a research, strategy, analyst, or intelligence group within the marketing unit. This group often researchers and interacts with the market to define long term direction of where the market is, then brings in key product teams to define a roadmap based on future direction. This group has challenges, as if they don’t tie their efforts to the point of transaction (signups, revenue), they’re efforts will not be considered grounded and their value to the company will be challenged.

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Trust on the Internet – Connect.Me and Respect Network is the solution

Trust on the internet is the focus of OIX (Open Identity Exchange), a non-profit company organization founded by Google, Paypal, AT&T and others. Their business is to establish, standardise and manage “trust frameworks” – legal, business and social rules that enables parties unknown to each other to trust their respective digital identities. The trust frameworks are designed to be public, standardised and inter-operable, so that people and companies can play various roles in the framework and still manage trusted relationships.

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Social Can Remove The Air Sandwich

Social Can Remove The Air Sandwich | digitalNow | Scoop.it

History has taught us that the number one reason strategies fail is because of the lack of execution. History is now teaching us that unless we learn to engage people, not just people called executives, in a conversation about needs, wants and desires we simply cannot expect to meet those needs.

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Calculate 'return on agility' to find the cloud's real value

Want to create a real win-win for your organization and employees? Offer social media training.

Even if your company doesn’t plan to open up the firewall and let employees use social media at work, it’s in an organization’s best interest to train employees on the responsible use of social media. This includes topics like creating secure passwords, accessing WiFi networks safely, and reminders about confidential and proprietary information.

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Terminal Velocity: Streamlining Business Travel

Terminal Velocity: Streamlining Business Travel | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Chances are, you took one of the 6.8 million business trips in the U.S. in the past year (according to Business News Daily).
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IT spending to grow in 2012 despite economic woes, says IDC

Software, storage, enterprise network, and mobile device sales help save the day, with IT spending still on course to grow by 6 percent in 2012...
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When a Board Strays Toward Trouble

When a Board Strays Toward Trouble | digitalNow | Scoop.it

Understanding Board Culture

Simply, culture implicitly communicates the rules for behaving in a team. Culture teaches the dos and don’ts. And, culture will penalize those who fail to abide by the norms and unwritten rules. Every board develops a unique culture and the ground rules are defined by the factors presented in Figure 1, “The Board of Directors Culture Model.” The five factors capture the elements of board culture which are most significant in defining the cultural ground rules of a board—these factors represent the norms, standards and values that will be learned by newly appointed directors, played out in the everyday functioning of a board, and those factors which will be tested during times of change and re-assessment. For a full description of the board culture model see “Understanding Your Board’s Culture“ (NACD Directorship, September 2011)

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Buyers say the cloud is already tired out

The core problem is that most cloud technology providers believe what they do is innovative. To them, that means adopting the strategies of the market leaders, replicating their features and APIs (call for call), and hyping the market.

While such a "fast follower" strategy have worked a few years ago, it falls flat today with IT organizations that are much more savvy -- and cautious -- about the cloud. They understand that, for cloud computing to have value, it must bring something new to the table. Lacking those innovations, and thus that value, they understandably take a wait-and-see approach.

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The 4-Letter Word That Everybody’s Talking About

People have mentioned it during sessions, uttered it over coffee, and probed its meaning in conversations. The word is “grit.”

It’s as good a word as any for the determination that many educators now associate with student success. Grit, as described by some researchers, is the habit of overcoming challenges, of learning from mistakes instead of being defeated by them. One administrator described it as “that fire in the belly.”

It’s long been said that test scores and grade-point averages don’t tell you the whole story about an applicant, but these days there’s growing interest in ways of measuring—and improving—student’s “noncognitive” skills, as speakers here at the National Association for College Admission Counseling’s annual meeting attested.

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Tablets Boost Mobile Shopping Dollars

Consumers spend an average of $10 more per purchase using a tablet compared to the average purchase made through a mobile device, says the report. Even within the tablet world, there are noticeable differences between amount, type, and frequency of purchases made by Kindle Fire and Apple iPad owners.

Mary Monahan, Executive Vice President and Research Director, Mobile at Javelin, says “... increasingly mobile devices like tablets are being used as shopping tools... Apps engage consumers to make purchases... retailers must... convert browsers into buyers.”


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The absurdity of the 40 hour workweek

When people are “always on,” responsiveness becomes ingrained in the way they work, expected by clients and partners, and even institutionalized in performance metrics. There is no impetus to explore whether the work actually requires 24/7 responsiveness; to the contrary, people just work harder and longer, without considering how they could work better.

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Like It or Leave It

Among those who like brands on Facebook...

82% say Facebook is a good place to interact with brands
75% say they feel more connected to brands
69% say they have liked a brand because a friend has done so
Among 82% who say Facebook is a good place to interact with brands, only 35% say they believe brands listen to them
When liking brands on Facebook, most people want something in return, like promos and discounts, and free giveaways. 14% of social media users who like brand pages say they do so out of loyalty to the brand.

Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/184677/like-it-or-leave-it.html#ixzz28luogMvS

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Planning and procrastination

Planning and procrastination | digitalNow | Scoop.it

“Planning is an unnatural process; it is much more fun to do something. And the nicest thing about not planning is that failure comes as a complete surprise rather than being preceded by a period of worry and depression.”

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Public Speaking Pays the Fare for Some Business Travelers

Public Speaking Pays the Fare for Some Business Travelers | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Public speaking, a requirement in many jobs, also provides employment or extra income to thousands of people who travel for speaking engagements that can pay from $1,500 to more than $200,000.
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How Long Are You Willing to Wait for Customer Service?

How Long Are You Willing to Wait for Customer Service? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
How long are customers willing to wait on hold for customer service? Is one gender more patient than the other? Do age and income have any effect?
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Social Media Training

Want to create a real win-win for your organization and employees? Offer social media training.

Even if your company doesn’t plan to open up the firewall and let employees use social media at work, it’s in an organization’s best interest to train employees on the responsible use of social media. This includes topics like creating secure passwords, accessing WiFi networks safely, and reminders about confidential and proprietary information.

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IT spending is top board-level priority

Corporate boards are prioritizing IT spending as highly as investments in sales operations, according to research announced Monday by analyst firm Gartner.

IT and sales were tied as the top two priorities among 175 board members, mostly in the U.S. and U.K., polled in March and April for the Gartner-Forbes 2012 Board of Directors Survey. Sixty-four percent said IT spending would rise during their companies' fiscal 2012.

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Leadership Isn’t About a Paycheck

Leadership Isn’t About a Paycheck | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Companies have to move past the thinking that leadership is only doled out in pithy inspirational doses from those on high at or near the boardroom.
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Save our servers: The next extinction begins

Traditional equipment makers are stuck, as tablets and smartphones kill PC sales and the cloud eats into server sales...
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Group Decision Making – 7 Ways to Get Things Done

Group Decision Making – 7 Ways to Get Things Done | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Of course, the one we have a tendency to strive for is consensus building, but not every decision is suited for consensus. It’s essential to choose the right method for the topic being discussed.

I doubt it’s necessary to achieve consensus on the decision about what color to paint the employee break room. But there are people out there who will kill themselves not just to get consensus but to reach unanimous agreement. There could also be times when it’s in the best interest of the company for a small group to make a decision, such as a company downsizing.

The next time you’re asked to a meeting, try to take a few moments to watch the group make a decision. See if you can figure out if the decision is being made by the minority or by the majority of the group. And what decision making method they’re using. Ask yourself if the method fits the message.

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Daniella Samano's comment, September 15, 2013 4:44 PM
The article discusses the difficulties leaders face when trying to reach a unanimous decision based on the best interests of the company or group. The article presents 7 ways in which a decisions can be made, and how to accurately identify them in a group setting. The article states that leaders are to keep their company's objective in mind and to not utilize their biased views on what is right or wrong when making decisions. In turn making it difficult to completely acknowledge the views of every individual involved in the decision making process.
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Global Food Prices Set To Soar--Again -

Global Food Prices Set To Soar--Again - | digitalNow | Scoop.it

Their conclusion was based on a comparison between the variation of food prices over time and the frequency of riots. This seems to show that when food prices rise above a certain threshold, riots are much more likely.

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The Semantic, Responsive Navicon

After reading this you may feel like I’m over-analyzing something so small, and on the surface it may look insignificant when in fact it’s quite the opposite. Building responsively requires more care and attention than we have ever given to our craft. A mobile-first approach invites opportunities for the butterfly effect in our work, in which a bad decision that could impact page weight (or loading redundant resources) for small contexts could be detrimental to the user experience in small contexts and beyond. We, as craftsmen of the Web, have a duty to sensibly inform, instruct and exercise responsible Web design.

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5 Critical Control Chart Characteristics You May Not Be Aware Of

No matter if you call yourself a “lean practitioner” or “six sigma practitioner” or some combination of the two… one “tool” you should have a deep understanding of is the control chart.
I’ve written about control charts before so if you’re not familiar with what they are I’d suggest you check these articles out before pressing on with this article.
Control Charts Part 1: Learn what control charts are, their history, and why control limits are +/- 3 standard deviations from the mean.
Control Charts Part 2: Learn about Attribute Data Control Charts (P chart, C chart, and U chart)
Control Charts Part 3: Learn about Variables Data Control Charts (I MR chart)
With this said, what I’ve discovered is that there are a few “details” related to control charts that many lean and six sigma practitioners aren’t aware of.

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