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digitalNow
Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
Curated by Don Dea
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8 Things Remarkably Successful People Do

8 Things Remarkably Successful People Do | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The most successful people in business work differently. See what they do--and why it works.
Don Dea's insight:

They are never too proud.

To admit they made a mistake. To say they are sorry. To have big dreams. To admit they owe their success to others. To poke fun at themselves. To ask for help.

To fail.

And to try again.

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Baby Boomers Lead Pharma Online Script Fulfillment

More consumers are filling their prescriptions online, with a surprising demographic leading that digital consumer transition—baby boomers, an age group most likely to have ongoing prescription needs.
Don Dea's insight:
Mobile apps are key means of ordering prescriptions online

Consumer healthcare research has increasingly moved to the internet, and now consumers are beginning to manage their pharma prescriptions online as well.

Baby boomers are the generation most likely to have pharmaceutical needs, and as such, they are defying digital norms by leading, rather than following, the online trend. More than one-third of baby boomers were already managing their prescriptions online, according to October research from customer experience management company Empathica. And nearly as many baby boomers were actually filling those prescriptions online, a higher percentage than either Generation X consumers or millennials doing the same.

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Evernote Founder Phil Libin's Rule for Success: No Tricks

Evernote Founder Phil Libin's Rule for Success: No Tricks | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Phil Libin, the founder of Evernote, once used sleight-of-hand to play up strengths and downplay weakness. He's found a better strategy for building strong relationships.
Don Dea's insight:

When I started launching companies, I realized that what I knew about magic could give me a real edge in certain business situations. Here's a simple example: One basic technique all magicians know is the false choice. You give your audience the impression that it decided something, but you control things so that in fact you decided.

When I was pitching investors on my second company, CoreStreet, my presentation had two parts: the product part and the business part. The product was strong, but the business side frankly wasn't that good. So, I'd present the product part first. I'd had it all staged for maximum effect, but the investors would always want to jump ahead to the business part. I hated that. It ruined my presentation.

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6 Email Marketing Myths

6 Email Marketing Myths | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Everyone knows you shouldn't send the same email twice, right? Wrong.
Don Dea's insight:

Myth 1: If you send a lot of emails, you'll annoy your customers.
In our extensive testing, we have found that as long as your e-mails and subject lines feel fresh, varied, and not spammy-feeling, it is nearly impossible to send too many emails to your clients. Yes, some people may unsubscribe. But the impact you get from sending more emails far outweighs the loss of a few subscribers.
Besides, you can reduce the number of unsubscribes by giving customers an option to reduce the number of emails they receive rather than unsubscribing completely. For example, our unsubscribe page helps us retain more than 10 percent of people who wanted to unsubscribe. 

Myth 2: You shouldn't send the same email twice.
We always send the same email twice, but with a twist. Every email that we send is followed 48 hours later by what we call a "remail." Basically, it's the same content, but with a different subject line. We send remails only to those customers who didn't open the first email.
We've found that remails can often double our results (we see a 60 percent lift, on average). And all without the effort of writing more copy or designing a second email.

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Google's Expanded Travel Info Revamps Marketer Landscape

Google’s launch of travel-related search engines and acquisition of travel and restaurant guides have resulted in major changes to search engine results, maps, social graphs and mobile services.
Don Dea's insight:

As results drop further down the page, strategies besides SEO become important

Google’s stated mission is to “organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” And recently it has extended that effort into the travel space, upending the online landscape for travel marketers, according to a new eMarketer report, “Travel Search Redefined: What Google's Travel Content Means for Marketers.”


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Confessions Of A Digital Hoarder

Confessions Of A Digital Hoarder | digitalNow | Scoop.it
How the urge to keep, capture and archive has turned me into the digital equivalent of a cat lady.
Don Dea's insight:
Try, Try Again: Prying Open The Crypt

Still, I'm trying to find a shoe that fits. I've been tooling around in Springpad for the past month or so. It's not the same kind of sprawling archive as Evernote, but at least I don't dread opening it (yet). 

If Evernote began to seem like a sarcophagus, Springpad feels like a living record. Now, instead of hoarding the desiccated remains of half-baked ideas and everything my eyeballs graze online, I'm trying to shake the compulsion to keep everything, instead curating a small batch of themed notebooks for work and play.

But I admit: I still harbor fantasies about Evernote. Making it work still feels like the sweetest dream of the seasoned cyberhoarder. For now I've abandoned it, but a battalion of active IFTTT triggers still fire away at my account. I can't quite bring myself to turn them off.

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How to Spark a Great Idea: 5 Steps

How to Spark a Great Idea: 5 Steps | digitalNow | Scoop.it
There is a simple method for creating great ideas. And it really works.
Don Dea's insight:

Even though his ideas are more than 70 years old, they are still relevant today. Best: They really do work. 

Step 1: Gathering Raw Material

Always be on the lookout for interesting material and capture it however you can, whenever you see it. “Gathering raw material in a real way is not as simple as it sounds,” says Young. “Instead of working systematically at the job of gathering raw material we sit around hoping for inspiration to strike us.” Rip out that article, email it to yourself, jot something down in your iPhone Notes app, use Evernote. You never know what you might do with that raw material later. Some of my most creative business ideas came from magazines I would never buy, but picked up while waiting in a doctor’s office.

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How to Refresh Your Brain--in 10 Minutes

How to Refresh Your Brain--in 10 Minutes | digitalNow | Scoop.it
When you go from one task to the next--all day long--your mind constantly races to catch up. Hit the reset button with this underrated trick.
Don Dea's insight:

Puddicombe recommends simply setting aside 10 minutes each day to quiet your mind. Practice observing thoughts and anxieties without passing judgment--simply experience them. Focus on the present moment and nothing else.

“We can’t change every little thing that happens to us,” he acknowledges, “but we can change how we experience it.”

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Social Enterprise Is Not Living Up To Its Promise

Social Enterprise Is Not Living Up To Its Promise | digitalNow | Scoop.it
If you're not hearing a lot about social enterprise these days, it may be because no one can figure out what the hell social enterprise is.
Don Dea's insight:
Social Entreprise vs. Business As Usual

But in practice, a lot of companies have found that actually using this stuff is not a magic wand to bring forth happiness and productivity to their organization. The reason? Social media tools in the enterprise often work counter to the internal communications practices that have long been ingrained in companies.

For instance, in theory it might seem like a good idea to coordinate creative activities on social platforms. But in reality, there's always going to be the managerial hold-out who won't accept a project as actually moving forward unless there's a meeting or memos - the very things social enterprise practices are trying to eliminate. And there could be a legitimate need for this, too: If not done properly, social enterprise software can fail at making sure someone deals with all the boring minutia, like documentation for regulatory purposes, which could be a huge no-no.

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26 Apple Designs That Never Came To Be

26 Apple Designs That Never Came To Be | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Editors’ note: The following is an excerpt from Design Forward: Creative Strategies for Sustainable Change (Arnoldsche Art Publishers), edited by Hartmut Esslinger.In 1982, Apple was in its sixth year of existence, and Steve Jobs,...
Don Dea's insight:

We then determined that the next generation of a compact and “insanely great” Mac--dubbed BigMac and Baby Mac--had to bring Apple to the absolute forefront as a source of cool and friendly digital machines that everyone could use. We worked with Toshiba on a new cathode ray tube (CRT) front in order to avoid the cheap look of a regular CRT screen, and we also looked at flat-screen technology. To make the Mac as small as possible, we experimented with wireless keyboard and mouse connections. During the development of the baby Mac, Steve brought on prominent new team member Allan Kay. Given the great progress we were making with both our software team and Susan Kare’s work on the user-interface side, I felt that the Baby Mac would become one of the greatest products ever. But fate was against Steve and me; he lost a power struggle with John Sculley and was kicked out of Apple. With that, Baby Mac became my best design never to be produced. And with Steve gone, Apple had lost its soul, only to regain it twelve years later, when Steve returned in 1997.

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MOOCs are here. How should state universities respond?

MOOCs are here. How should state universities respond? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
A short essay argues that most institutions should immediately institute moratoriums on hiring new faculty and building new facilities, and that universities need to focus on clarifying their value proposition in a world of 'commodity [higher]...
Don Dea's insight:

Institutions and departments must immediately face up to the value proposition required in commodity education. Most state institutions cannot participate in the MOOC movement and do not have the capability to justify themselves by shifting from “education” to “research.” The question that must be answered by WRSU is: What do we have, or can we quickly develop, that is of real value and can be delivered at a price the new market will bear and will support us going forward? And the first step in answering this question must be an honest reflection on the “ground truth” of the institution; these decisions cannot be made with a “Lake Woebegone” mentality that insists on an “above average” self-image

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Moody’s Lowers Outlook on Higher Education Sector

Eva Bogaty, an analyst for Moody’s Investors Services, has authored a report that cuts the outlook for the U.S. higher education sector to negative, Bloomberg reports.
Don Dea's insight:

The rating company downgraded more than 20 universities last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Among the largest was Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education, a 14-school system including Bloomsburg University.

Moody’s cut $1.5 billion of the system’s debt to Aa3 from Aa2 largely because of its financial dependence on the state, which was also downgraded, it said in a release in October.

Other institutions downgraded included the private schools Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering in Needham, Massachusetts, and Morehouse College in Atlanta.

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Do we Fear Innovation?

Do we Fear Innovation? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
As a manager or as an organization do you reward innovation? If you ask anyone this question the answer will always be yes. But is this answer true or have we created an environment that talks abou...
Don Dea's insight:

Instead of asking the question about innovation, let us ask it about risk. Do we as a manager or an organization reward taking risks? Risk sounds scary. If we take risks we are going to fail sometimes, but is that a bad thing? Edison said, “Every wrong attempt discarded is often a step forward.” To innovate we have to take risks, make mistakes and learn from them.

Now back to the original question. Do you reward taking risks and being innovative or do you reward playing it safe and maintaining the status quo? Take a look at the following short video and see if this resembles your organization. The answer may surprise you.

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Why Do Americans Hate Technological Change?

Why Do Americans Hate Technological Change? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
A "good enough for me" attitude towards technology is not the best way to keep up with the global economy.
Don Dea's insight:
Why Did Macs Never Rule America?

Dan suggests one reason Americans support the iPhone is because "Apple is an American company, and Americans like to root for the home team." He also says "lawsuits against Android phone makers have been an effective form of marketing" and that Apple fanboys have depicted Android users as "low-class people who are uneducated, poor, cheap and too lacking in `taste.'"

While we might like the home team and being part of the cool-guy club, there is more to iPhone love than Apple and its "superior" marketing.

For instance, when Dan asks, “Why do such a huge majority of Americans go out of their way to choose Apple?” he is talking about smartphones - because as a country we are not really in love with Apple’s computers. According toArs Technica even at their peak of popularity, the computers of Apple have never even been one third as popular as the iPhone.

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10 Reasons Why Now Is Not A Good Time To Buy Apple Stock

10 Reasons Why Now Is Not A Good Time To Buy Apple Stock | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Of course, the key rule of investing in the stock market is: "Nobody knows anything."
Don Dea's insight:

There are two main counter-arguments for buying Apple:

One is the fact that it enjoys a low price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio, right round 10. Long story short, P/E ratios are rarely a good indicator of when to buy a stock, and do not necessarily a bargain make. A great time to have bought Apple was in October 2004, when its P/E ratio was 45.

The other is that Apple has tons of cash in the bank ($137 billion or so - enough to buy every man, woman and child on the planet the new Nicki Minaj CD and a slice of pizza). Unfortunately, Apple doesn't have ready access to most of that money, as the company is stashing it overseas for tax reasons.

Sure, maybe Apple may have one last ace up its sleeve with the Apple TV, but we won't know until it finally gets here - if it ever does.

To sum up, Apple's leadership and vision are suspect, its market share, margins and cool factor are shrinking, the stock is technically broken, and it's over-owned and over-loved. To me, it looks bad, really bad. But I'm so bearish that I'm probably wrong already. Apple could still get to $1,000 next year. But whether it hits new heights or falls to $200, or both, expect plenty of volatility, dead cat bounces and flash crashes along the way.

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Leadership and the Anatomy of a Good Apology

Leadership and the Anatomy of a Good Apology | digitalNow | Scoop.it
John Wayne, (or one of his many characters), once said, “ Never apologize, Mister. It’s a sign of weakness” He may have been right in many things but in this, he was mistaken.  Apologies, the good ...
Don Dea's insight:

A good apology starts with the right motivation ~ The most sincere reason for making an apology is simply to express deep regret and a desire to make a wrong, right again.  Anything else, like apologizing because doing so will make us feel better, is not much of an apology at all.

A good apology involves exposure and vulnerability …our own.  Apologizing well means that we have to lay aside all of our ‘built-in’ protective devices.  In other words, an apology accompanied by an excuse or a deflection of blame isn’t going to cut it.  To make it real, we have to reveal ourselves as the imperfect beings we are.  That’s the scary part.

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When Good Leaders Go Bad

When Good Leaders Go Bad | digitalNow | Scoop.it
A Skimmer's Guide to Tipping Sacred Cows: Kick the Bad Work Habits That Masquerade as Virtues, by Jake Breeden
Don Dea's insight:

Don't "Just Do It": Passion becomes destructive when leaders subvert other values, burn out their workers, or dismiss ideas that counter their beliefs, says Breeden. Or when that passion stems from insecurities. He suggests passionate leaders ask themselves, "Am I trying to prove something to myself or someone else?

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Top 7 Most In-Demand Tech Skills For 2013

Top 7 Most In-Demand Tech Skills For 2013 | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Need a better job? ReadWrite has put together an exclusive list of the seven most sought-after tech skills for 2013.
Don Dea's insight:
All Things "Cloud" 

The cloud computing craze is still going strong, if tech job hiring trends are any indication. Specifically, companies are looking for software developers who specialize in things like virtualization and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) development, with familiarity with Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) technologies. 

According to one survey of IT execs, 25% of companies are planning on hiring people with SaaS and related cloud-computing expertise in 2013.  In general, SaaS and virtualization are both buzzwords often cited as being on-the-rise on job search sites. 

Of course, SaaS and PaaS (not to mention whatever-else-as-a-service) can utilize any number of specific programming languages and technologies (more on those below). Suffice it to say that if a given skill helps companies utilize cloud infrastructure or virtualize any aspect of their computing needs, it's in high demand.

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Big Data: Overhyped And Overpaid?

Big Data: Overhyped And Overpaid? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Gartner claims that Big Data is overhyped and about to fall into the trough of disillusionment, but salaries for Big Data pros suggest that enterprises are putting their money where their mouth is.
Don Dea's insight:

My most advanced... Hadoop clients are also getting disillusioned. They do not realize that they are ahead of others and think that someone else is successful while they are struggling. These organizations have fascinating ideas, but they are disappointed with a difficulty of figuring out reliable solutions... Formulating a right question is always hard, but with big data, it is an order of magnitude harder, because you are blazing the trail (not grazing on the green field).

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10 Cures For TechnoStress

10 Cures For TechnoStress | digitalNow | Scoop.it
We asked our SF writer/mindfulness practitioner guru Jackie Ashton to weigh in on the subject and give us ideas for managing our technology consumption.
Don Dea's insight:

Take an inventory. Have you ever looked up at the end of the day and gasped, "Where did the time go?" Well—where did it? Jot down notes about how, when, and for how long you use technology. Be specific: How many minutes do you spend responding to email? Do you check your Twitter feed before coffee? (Be honest.) Our digital availability can be a notorious time suck. Apps like Toggl, which tracks time spent online, and Anti-Social, which will temporarily disable your social networks, can help.

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6 Habits of Remarkably Likable People

6 Habits of Remarkably Likable People | digitalNow | Scoop.it
They're charming. They're genuine. And they can make an entire room full of people smile.
Don Dea's insight:

Social jiu-jitsu is easy. Just ask the right questions. Stay open-ended and allow room for description and introspection. Ask how, or why, or who.

As soon as you learn a little about someone, ask how they did it. Or why they did it. Or what they liked about it, or what they learned from it, or what you should do if you're in a similar situation.

No one gets too much recognition. Asking the right questions implicitly shows you respect another person's opinion--and, by extension, the person.

We all like people who respect us, if only because it shows they display great judgmen

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Two-Factor Authorization Is Awesome - Until You Lose the Damn Token

Two-Factor Authorization Is Awesome - Until You Lose the Damn Token | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Two-factor authorization requires information from something you physically have. But what happens when you no longer have it?
Don Dea's insight:

First, Google recommends that I find a computer that has already logged into my accounts. I have one machine, my primary office computer, that Google remembers for 30 days at a time. I can get into that and start performing the tasks that need to be done. Even if I am away from home, I can call a family member and walk them through the process.

The very first thing to do if you lose the phone (er, token) is get connected to the accounts for which the phone is being used for two-factor authentication and change the password. Most of the time a phone is lost, it's just that: lost. And, even if it were stolen, most of the time it's going to be taken by some numbskull who will soon be taking pictures of themselves and their friends so you can track them down and take it back. Still, better to be safe than sorry.

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Visual Thinking

Visual Thinking | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The role of visual thinking in the process of innovation cannot be overemphasized.  This is another reason why we demonstrate the ease of learning to draw at the Edison Event.  Keeping a record of ...
Don Dea's insight:

Eugene S. Ferguson (1916-2004), a pioneer in the subject of the importance of visual thinking in technology and a successful engineer, scholar and teacher of engineering, suggested that “Pyramids, cathedrals and rockets exist not because of geometry, theory of structures, or thermodynamics, but because they were first a picture — literally a vision — in the minds of those who built them.”

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A Peek Over the Horizon

  2013 is upon us, budgets are locked and people are looking forward, with great anticipation to the rewards 2013 will surely bring. Many look upon a new year as an opportunity, a time to make...
Don Dea's insight:

Where we will be in 2014:

  • Cloud becomes the default position, then we will all realize it is actually a hybrid model
  • We might stop arguing about definitions, buzzwords that fizzle
  • The FAA and FCC will decide that phones are ‘ok’ on airplanes, we will all complain
  • The CIO and CMO will be best of friends, like a shotgun wedding
  • Customer Centricity will be a reality, not just a Vision
  • Something not yet on our radar, will cause a major disruption
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We Can Measure Educational Value in Words

We Can Measure Educational Value in Words | digitalNow | Scoop.it
The great benefit of education, "the key to increasingly upward mobility," is expanding the vocabulary of students.
Don Dea's insight:

1. Hirsch observes that "vocabulary size is a convenient proxy for a whole range of educational attainments and abilities—not just skill in reading, writing, and listening, and speaking but also general knowledge of science, history, and the arts."  People have large vocabularies because they know a lot.  They know a lot, because they've read a lot—that is, many, many challenging books and articles and such.

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