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How a Book is born

How a Book is born | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Don Dea's insight:

Tracking innovation, development and experimentation in information studies and library science and spotting new technologies, trends, fun stuff and much more

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digitalNow
Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
Curated by Don Dea
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How to Unleash Innovation Hidden in Your Enterprise

How to Unleash Innovation Hidden in Your Enterprise | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Creativity Requires Diversity
To many executives, involving rank-and-file workers in business strategy is a strange concept. Isn’t business strategy better left to those trained in it? Can’t the VP of operations provide all the insights a regular employee could — and then some?

The reality, however, is that strategic planners tend to be a homogenous bunch, and organizational creativity thrives on diversity. Three-quarters of a strategy team might be ex-consultant MBAs or members of the executive suite. Sure, their ideas might look great in 2×2 or 9-box matrices, but they’re all several degrees of separation from the factory floor.

Innovation happens when those executive-level ideas collide with equally valuable ones from everyday workers. Without the 30,000-foot view, ideas might work in practice without benefiting the broader company; without the ground-level one, ideas that sound great in the boardroom might hamstring production.
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Courage and Kryptonite: How CEO's Can Humanize Themselves

Courage and Kryptonite: How CEO's Can Humanize Themselves | digitalNow | Scoop.it
INWARD FOCUS

High and Lows: Think back over time to identify choice highs and lows in your career trajectory. A few key moments when your innate strengths and abilities shone through, or when you persisted and overcame adversity.
Values and Traits: Allow yourself to truly adopt those choice moments as chapters in the story of what brought you to where you are today, and consider what values and character traits each of these chapters represent.
Re-Telling Your Way: Take all this reflection and literally journal your story, allowing yourself to be as creative as you like. Notice the descriptions you choose to make in re-telling your story.
Look Forward: Now write a future-oriented chapter that tells the tale of how you are and who you are as a leader. What strengths and abilities do you imagine you are known for? What weaknesses do you see you’ll have, and how will you rely on others for support? What are the tools, practices, and allies you turn to when facing big challenges?
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Hit or myth? Understanding the true costs and impact of cybersecurity programs

Hit or myth? Understanding the true costs and impact of cybersecurity programs | digitalNow | Scoop.it
All assets in the organization must be protected the same way

Not all data are created with equal value. The customer data associated with a bank’s credit-card program or a retailer’s loyalty-card program are of greater value than the generic invoice numbers and policy documents that companies generate in-house. Companies don’t have endless resources to protect all data at any cost, and yet most deploy one-size-fits-all cybersecurity strategies. When faced with a request from the IT organization for more funding for cybersecurity, C-suite leaders tend to approve it reflexively (particularly in the wake of a recent security breach) without a more detailed discussion of trade-offs—for instance, how much is “too much” to spend on protecting one set of critical data versus another? Or if the company protects all external-facing systems, what kind of opportunities is it missing by not bringing suppliers into the fold (using appropriate policies and governance approaches)? Indeed, most business executives we’ve spoken with acknowledge a blind spot when it comes to understanding the return they are getting on their security investments and associated trade-offs.

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The CEO’s guide to competing through HR

The CEO’s guide to competing through HR | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Rethink the role of the business partner

The starting point is for HR business partners—those senior HR individuals who counsel managers on talent issues—to stop acting as generalists and show that they really own the critical talent asset. This is a big enough change that it calls for a change in roles: replacing the business-partner role entirely with a new talent value leader (TVL), who would not only help business leaders connect talent decisions to value-creating outcomes but would also be held fully accountable for the performance of the talent.

The talent value leader

A TVL should have real authority over hiring and firing, even if actual decision rights remain with managers in the way actual spending decisions are taken by budget owners rather than being dictated by the finance function. Think of the manager of a European football team who is responsible for allocating resources using acquisition, compensation, evaluation, development, motivation, and other levers to maximize the players’ collective performance.
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Companies Need to Develop a Data Science Strategy

Once business leaders understand how data science can make a difference, an enterprise can formulate a plan for putting data science methodologies to work.


Unlocking the secrets contained in data is at the center of business success, but the path to progress can be daunting. Today, data comes in an array of forms—both structured and unstructured— and streams in from many sources.

The challenges run deep. There are data mining techniques to consider, statistical methods to tap, and applications and tools to use. Finally, there's a need to bring business context to the data and ensure that an organization is using the data to solve fundamental business problems.
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How will same-day and on-demand delivery evolve in urban markets?

How will same-day and on-demand delivery evolve in urban markets? | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Many delivery start-ups are one-trick ponies

Although urban delivery start-ups are striking a chord with consumers, their rise is ultimately due to investors’ bets on a virtuous cycle. Namely, the success of the urban delivery market depends on scale at a level that is only possible with heavy up-front investment.

More than two-thirds of today’s urban delivery start-up action is in one category: prepared-food delivery. However, winners in this space are already emerging, and their dominance is clear. For the many runners up, a new hunting ground is needed, but it will be hard to come by. Markets such as groceries or nonfood retail do not offer the same rare combination of high gross margins and high urgency as hot food does. At average variable costs per delivery as high as $7 to $10, profitability will remain out of reach for these start-ups in the broader market—unless they reinvent themselves and address the limitations of their instant delivery model. This entails moving from pure point-to-point delivery to more cost-efficient network-based consolidation (and with it, from instant to same-day delivery) and adopting “old school” models of product warehousing and employment. For most new entrants, however, a shift of this magnitude would exceed their capabilities and budgets, and trying to make it happen would set them up for failure.

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The changing market for food delivery

The changing market for food delivery | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Two tiers for online food delivery

Two types of online platforms have risen to fill that void. The first type is the “aggregators,” which emerged roughly 15 years ago; the second is the “new delivery” players, which appeared in 2013. Both allow consumers to compare menus, scan and post reviews, and place orders from a variety of restaurants with a single click. The aggregators, which are part of the traditional-delivery category, simply take orders from customers and route them to restaurants, which handle the delivery themselves. In contrast, the new-delivery players build their own logistics networks, providing delivery for restaurants that don’t have their own drivers.

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How customer demands are reshaping last-mile delivery

How customer demands are reshaping last-mile delivery | digitalNow | Scoop.it
With the rise of e-commerce, consumer preferences have grown increasingly important in the formerly business-oriented parcel-delivery market. Large e-commerce players, as well as various start-ups, have identified last-mile services as a key differentiator. In fact, the variety of delivery options and the perceived quality of the delivery service are major decision-making criteria for online customers and hence directly affect e-commerce players’ success in the marketplace. With this in mind, vendors are working hard to offer the best customer experience possible, especially by improving delivery times. To gain a better understanding of what customers actually prefer, we conducted a survey of more than 4,700 respondents in China, Germany, and the United States. We used conjoint analysis to better understand consumers’ relative preferences for different delivery options, including their willingness to pay (Exhibit 1). Nearly 25 percent of consumers are willing to pay significant premiums for the privilege of same-day or instant delivery. This share is likely to increase, given that younger consumers are more inclined (just over 30 percent) to choose same-day and instant delivery over regular delivery.
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A business leader’s guide to agile

A business leader’s guide to agile | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Senior executives often tend to assume that after they set overarching digital goals, it’s up to IT to deliver on them quickly through a range of initiatives. In their view, agility is something for R&D engineers and software developers only. The business units hold fast to tried-and-true methods for communicating with IT—throwing their requirements “over the wall” and waiting for IT to build and deliver finished products. The IT organization ends up operating with limited information from the business, the business units lose their opportunity to steer technology development toward desired goals, and agility stalls.
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The 2 best tools for building an engaged workforce

After years of studying employees at all organizational levels and examining the drivers of engagement most likely to motivate a company’s best and brightest, what I’ve learned boils down to four simple and unalterable realities:
Beyond a certain baseline level of pay and perks, giving your employees more money will not guarantee their engagement and loyalty, nor will it help them develop that essential connection between their own purpose and passions and the job you’re asking them to perform.
Millennials and baby boomers have more in common than leaders might expect. Both groups are searching for more personal fulfillment from their jobs and are becoming increasingly unwilling to settle for less.
As a leader, you have the capacity and the responsibility for shaping a work culture of engagement. Purpose and passion are the two best tools in your leadership arsenal for crafting that culture.
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Few Marketers Prioritize Revenue Metrics Over Engagement Metrics in Measuring Social Media Success 

By far the biggest challenge for social media marketers is measuring ROI, according to a new Simply Measured report [download page], with the many also struggling to tie social to business goals. Faced with an inability to quantify revenues driven by social, few are using revenue and conversion metrics as their standards.
In its latest annual “The State of Social Marketing” report, Simply Measured surveyed more than 2,700 social media marketing professionals across the globe with a variety of job titles and from a mix of company sizes (though a bare majority were from companies with up to 50 employees).
Respondents were asked which of 4 types of metrics they use most often to measure the success of social media.
Some 58% reported that they use engagement metrics (such as likes, comments, shares, retweets, etc) as their standard of success. The use of this as a typical metric varied little between brand and agency professionals

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How Silent Meditation Helped Me Succeed at Work 

How Silent Meditation Helped Me Succeed at Work  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Yes, you read that right. Silent meditation. One might ask: Isn’t it obvious that you are almost always silent when you mediate? Yes, but what I mean by silent meditation is the technique referred to as Vipassana (which means to see things the way they are), one of India’s most ancient meditation techniques. I learned it over a 10-day course at Igatpuri in Western India, among the world’s largest meditation centers and the main center of Vipassana’s rapidly growing global community of practitioners. Participants in the course stay silent for 10 days. They do not utter a word (unless there is an emergency); make no gestures or facial expressions; and they commit to spending 10 to 12 hours a day meditating between 5 a.m. and 8 p.m. (with a few breaks in between).

Imagine a day without your phone or an internet connection; a day when you don’t communicate with another person or say a single word. A day without anyone you know around you. Now multiply that by 10. That is a Vipassana meditation course. It is by far the toughest thing I have done in my life. I believe it is one of my most significant achievements.
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Merge to grow: Realizing the full commercial potential of your merger 

Merge to grow: Realizing the full commercial potential of your merger  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Establish a central team staffed with ‘A-players’

In a recent McKinsey survey of 1,600 M&A executives,2 we found that more than 70 percent of those who meet or exceed their revenue-synergy goals establish what we call a commercial integration management office (IMO). This group, which is ideally established soon after announcement and well before close, is responsible and accountable for the overall commercial integration effort.

Too often, however, we see companies staff the integration team with those who happen to be available or are part of special-projects groups, often including part-time team members who lack the necessary skills. An inadequate IMO often results in a failure to prepare the commercial organization for a seamless integration on the first day of the merged company’s existence, i.e., Day One.

To be successful, the IMO needs an integration leader with complete accountability, allocated full-time for the duration of the effort and with the appropriate seniority to guide the integration strategy. The rest of the team should consist of highly skilled A-players who can devote the necessary time and are deeply networked within their respective organizations.

2. Validate the deal model to set realistic targets

It’s crucial that acquiring companies stress test the deal model (see “The artful synergist, or how to get more value from mergers and acquisitions”). In many cases, the expected revenue synergies turn out to be based on little more than gut-level, back-of-the-envelope estimates. For revenue-based deals, such estimates underpinning the projected value of the acquisition can set up potentially unrealistic aspirations. The results of the M&A Capabilities Survey show that some 87 percent of companies whose mergers are successful identify sources of value effectively, vs. only 66 percent of their less successful peers.
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Leadership at Two Levels

These are the moments every leader must strive to master…

·    We want to seek wisdom when the world has decided a sound bite will do.

·    We want the audacity to expect the best in the most difficult of circumstances.

·    We want the ability to accept responsibility rather than blame others.

·    We long to do what is right without thought of personal costs.

·    And, more than anything else, we want to consistently put others ahead of ourselves.

These are the behaviors, even habits, we want and need to cultivate in our own actions. It is our success here, in these moments that matters most.
Only when these behaviors are harnessed and hotwired into our very soul, their power now under our control…

Then, and only then, does the servant earn the opportunity to become the leader.
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Repelling the cyberattackers

Repelling the cyberattackers | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Identify all the issues

It’s nearly impossible to have an intelligent perspective on how well a cybersecurity function performs without first understanding which information assets are at risk. When companies fail to do so, they can make the wrong downstream choices. One financial institution started its program by assessing regulatory requirements. Two years later, it had made some technical progress but had spent a lot of money and devoted almost all of its efforts to protecting consumers’ personal data, to the exclusion of other important information assets.
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Protecting your critical digital assets: Not all systems and data are created equal

Protecting your critical digital assets: Not all systems and data are created equal | digitalNow | Scoop.it
All data and systems are not created equal

In any given enterprise, some of the data, systems, and applications are more critical than others. Some are more exposed to risk, and some are more likely to be targeted. Critical assets and sensitivity levels also vary widely across sectors. For hospital systems, for example, the most sensitive asset is typically patient information; other data such as how the emergency room is functioning may even be publically available. Risks to priority data include breach, theft, and even ransom—recall that a Los Angeles hospital paid a $17,000 Bitcoin ransom to a hacker that had seized control of its systems. An aerospace-systems manufacturer, on the other hand, needs to protect intellectual property first and foremost, from systems designs to process methodologies. A financial-services company requires few controls for its marketing materials but is vulnerable to fraudulent transactions; its M&A database, furthermore, will need the best protection money can buy. Attackers can be individuals or organizations, such as criminal syndicates or governments with significant resources at their command. The attacks can be simple or sophisticated, the objectives varying from immediate financial reward to competitive or even geopolitical advantage.
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People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong

People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Cutting through the hiring noise and bias

The democracy of numbers can also help organizations eliminate unconscious preferences and biases, which can surface even when those responsible have the best of intentions. For instance, a professional-services company had been nearly overwhelmed by the 250,000 job applications it received every year. By introducing more advanced automation, it sought to reduce the costs associated with the initial résumé-screening process, and to improve screening effectiveness. One complication was the aggressive goals the company had simultaneously set for hiring more women, prompting concern that a machine programmed to mine for education and work experience might undermine that effort.
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How do you decipher someone's values?

With these two questions, you can determine the veracity of your stated values and if they are fully functioning in your life. Your answers immediately point out discrepancies between your espoused values (what you say you value) and your true values (what you act on). For example, you write …
“I value innovation.” But, in truth, you don’t spend time nurturing people’s creativity, but rather, applying pressure to drive results that shuts down people’s creativity.
“I value work-life balance.” But you spend 65 hours a week at work, often choosing business matters over family matters, and expect the same of your team members.
“I value compassion; I really care about people.” But, what percentage of your income do you donate to charitable causes? How much time do you spend helping the less fortunate? Does the way you spend your money and time support your claim of compassion?
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How A Speaker Can Break Through And Connect With Their Audience

How A Speaker Can Break Through And Connect With Their Audience | digitalNow | Scoop.it
It’s All About The Experience

So here’s an interesting question for you, when you are giving a speech, just exactly how are you communicating with your audience? If you think that it is only your words that they are receiving then you would be wrong. I’m pretty sure that by now we all realize that our audience’s brains will turn off if they are presented with boring material. As speakers we need to keep in mind that our audience has multiple senses: sight, sound, taste, and touch. What we are going to have to do is to touch on these other senses during our next speech.

If we can agree that creating a speech that is really a “multisensory experience” is a good thing to do, the next big question is just exactly how do we go about doing this? The answer is that you are going to have to change how you build your speech. Instead of just worrying about the words that will go into your speech, you are now going to have to make sure that your audience will be exposed to mesmerizing images, videos that capture their imagination, props that make them think, and, of course, words that are simply beautiful. One other point to realize is that if you can find a way to give your speech using different voices, that will also help to make it a true multisensory experience.
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6 Things All Customer Centric Leaders Do

Talk to customers – all the time!

It has always astonished me how many senior leaders within businesses have rarely met a customer. In some instances, those defining the strategic direction of organisations have NEVER met one.

Meeting and talking to customers should be as commonplace to a senior leader as having lunch. Failing to truly understand how your customers feel about the experience your company delivers to them is quite simply unacceptable in the world of business today.



Talking to customers should be the highlight of any leader’s week – the ability to listen and learn; empathise and question; test new ideas and theories. Talking to customers should not be seen as a chore – or something that a leader is ‘too busy to do’.
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An operating model for company-wide agile development

An operating model for company-wide agile development | digitalNow | Scoop.it
There are many reasons traditional companies have not been able to successfully scale up their agile programs, but we believe a chief impediment is their existing operating models and organizational structures. In most of these companies, the process of software or product development remains fragmented and complex: a business request for a new website feature can kick-start a development process involving multiple teams, each tackling a series of tasks that feed into the original request. For instance, one team working on the front-end application, another updating associated servers and databases, and still another reconciling the front-end application with legacy back-end systems. What’s more, the supporting business processes (among them, budgeting, planning, and outsourcing) and existing roles and responsibilities in both the IT organization and business units continue to adhere closely to the legacy waterfall approach.2
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Engineering the switch to digital

Engineering the switch to digital | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Digital is not a temporary thing. It’s not a one-time program. It’s a change that is affecting the whole industry, and getting better at it has become a permanent ambition for us. Since I joined the bank, we’ve been working hard to make it more digital. The role of technology within ING has had to change from being a support function to being a fully integrated part of the business, actually driving strategy for the bank.

You can see the evidence of that. We’ve digitized our processes to make transactions clear and easy for our customers. We’ve invested heavily in channels and touchpoints with our customers, introducing mobile and other technologies so that we can offer our services 24/7, anytime, anywhere. We’ve invested in analytics and in getting a 360-degree view of customers to better empower them to make important decisions about their financial assets. And we’ve introduced agile1 ways of working—in particular, a DevOps model.2
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12 Tips to Communicate Better and Improve Business Results

12 Tips to Communicate Better and Improve Business Results | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Here are twelve tried and true ideas for communication that drives results:

1. Don’t settle for good…be great: Good communication gets the message out, great communication connects the dots. Whether it’s in your detailed job description or not, your role is to connect the dots so others know what’s possible and their role in making it happen.

2. Build trust and credibility: Be visible and approachable, engage others openly, fully and early on.

3. Context and relevance: Remember to provide context and make information relevant so your audiences understand how they fit in and what it means to them. Provide job-related information so those you work with have the essential information they need to do their job effectively and/or make the best decisions.
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Great leaders focus on one important thing

Address interpersonal issues directly

If you’ve had clashes with others in the past, push beyond the desire to just avoid working with that person and address those issues directly. It’s not necessary to be friends with everyone in your organization, and sometimes a working style isn’t our (or someone else’s) cup of tea. Still, tackle the topic head on and have a respectful conversation. Chances are you’ll find some common areas of respect and ways to work together. These people may not be your supporters, but you can ensure they aren’t your detractors, either, with open, honest and direct communication.
Foster the message

Your supporters carry your message for you. Whether you are simply conveying a recommended tactic for a specific project at work or broadcasting the larger message of your brand as a good leader in your organization, the importance and the effect is the same. When you build a coalition with the people around you, you create buzz and enhance your visibility. By fostering and maintaining your diverse relationships, you raise others awareness of your abilities.
Great leaders prioritize building consensus not because they’re more important than results; they prioritize relationships because great results will follow. Look at how you might be struggling with coalition-building in your organization and find ways to build relationships that will be the key to your future success.
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What you can learn about public speaking from everyday conversation

Presenting and conversing are more alike than you realize -- with one exception

Think about it: When you’re talking casually with a friend or colleague over coffee, beer or maybe a glass of wine, what’s your intention?
To share ideas, opinions and information
To help your listener understand your point of view
To entertain or elicit emotion in the other person
Those are the same goals you’re looking to accomplish with a business presentation, aren’t they? In fact, public speaking is defined as “the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured manner intended to inform, persuade or entertain listeners.”
Another similarity between casual conversation and more formal presenting is the need to connect with the people you are speaking to. In both types of communication, the higher quality the connection you establish, the more memorable and impactful the interaction.
However, the definition of public speaking noted above reveals one important difference between presenting and everyday conversation: the structured nature of the communication and the planning that’s needed to create that structure. Casually talking with people around you is typically spontaneous and unstructured.
To be effective, a business presentation needs a clear framework and simple core message to ensure clarity. Because the stakes are higher and you have a time limit, you need to be sure your audience will clearly understand and remember the key point of what you have to say. That’s why advance preparation for your presentation is so essential: it allows you to  build appropriate structure to best serve the needs of your audience.
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