digitalNow
37.0K views | +5 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Don Dea
onto digitalNow
Scoop.it!

My Thoughts on Out of the Crisis - Deming

My Thoughts on Out of the Crisis - Deming | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Don Dea's insight:
14 points for managers

At the heart of Deming's approach to business transformation are his 14 points for management. Although 30 years old, these principles are still valid for any agile organisation. That is why I reference them (with permission) in my own book.

  1. Create constancy of purpose toward improvement of product and service, with the aim to become competitive, stay in business and to provide jobs.
  2. Adopt the new philosophy. We are in a new economic age. Western management must awaken to the challenge, must learn their responsibilities, and take on leadership for change.
  3. Cease dependence on inspection to achieve quality. Eliminate the need for inspection on a mass basis by building quality into the product in the first place.
more...
No comment yet.
digitalNow
Exploring leadership, management, innovation, and technology issues and trends; impacting associations & non-profit organizations in the digital age.
Curated by Don Dea
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

An operating model for company-wide agile development

An operating model for company-wide agile development | digitalNow | Scoop.it
There are many reasons traditional companies have not been able to successfully scale up their agile programs, but we believe a chief impediment is their existing operating models and organizational structures. In most of these companies, the process of software or product development remains fragmented and complex: a business request for a new website feature can kick-start a development process involving multiple teams, each tackling a series of tasks that feed into the original request. For instance, one team working on the front-end application, another updating associated servers and databases, and still another reconciling the front-end application with legacy back-end systems. What’s more, the supporting business processes (among them, budgeting, planning, and outsourcing) and existing roles and responsibilities in both the IT organization and business units continue to adhere closely to the legacy waterfall approach.2
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Engineering the switch to digital

Engineering the switch to digital | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Digital is not a temporary thing. It’s not a one-time program. It’s a change that is affecting the whole industry, and getting better at it has become a permanent ambition for us. Since I joined the bank, we’ve been working hard to make it more digital. The role of technology within ING has had to change from being a support function to being a fully integrated part of the business, actually driving strategy for the bank.

You can see the evidence of that. We’ve digitized our processes to make transactions clear and easy for our customers. We’ve invested heavily in channels and touchpoints with our customers, introducing mobile and other technologies so that we can offer our services 24/7, anytime, anywhere. We’ve invested in analytics and in getting a 360-degree view of customers to better empower them to make important decisions about their financial assets. And we’ve introduced agile1 ways of working—in particular, a DevOps model.2
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

12 Tips to Communicate Better and Improve Business Results

12 Tips to Communicate Better and Improve Business Results | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Here are twelve tried and true ideas for communication that drives results:

1. Don’t settle for good…be great: Good communication gets the message out, great communication connects the dots. Whether it’s in your detailed job description or not, your role is to connect the dots so others know what’s possible and their role in making it happen.

2. Build trust and credibility: Be visible and approachable, engage others openly, fully and early on.

3. Context and relevance: Remember to provide context and make information relevant so your audiences understand how they fit in and what it means to them. Provide job-related information so those you work with have the essential information they need to do their job effectively and/or make the best decisions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Great leaders focus on one important thing

Address interpersonal issues directly

If you’ve had clashes with others in the past, push beyond the desire to just avoid working with that person and address those issues directly. It’s not necessary to be friends with everyone in your organization, and sometimes a working style isn’t our (or someone else’s) cup of tea. Still, tackle the topic head on and have a respectful conversation. Chances are you’ll find some common areas of respect and ways to work together. These people may not be your supporters, but you can ensure they aren’t your detractors, either, with open, honest and direct communication.
Foster the message

Your supporters carry your message for you. Whether you are simply conveying a recommended tactic for a specific project at work or broadcasting the larger message of your brand as a good leader in your organization, the importance and the effect is the same. When you build a coalition with the people around you, you create buzz and enhance your visibility. By fostering and maintaining your diverse relationships, you raise others awareness of your abilities.
Great leaders prioritize building consensus not because they’re more important than results; they prioritize relationships because great results will follow. Look at how you might be struggling with coalition-building in your organization and find ways to build relationships that will be the key to your future success.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

What you can learn about public speaking from everyday conversation

Presenting and conversing are more alike than you realize -- with one exception

Think about it: When you’re talking casually with a friend or colleague over coffee, beer or maybe a glass of wine, what’s your intention?
To share ideas, opinions and information
To help your listener understand your point of view
To entertain or elicit emotion in the other person
Those are the same goals you’re looking to accomplish with a business presentation, aren’t they? In fact, public speaking is defined as “the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured manner intended to inform, persuade or entertain listeners.”
Another similarity between casual conversation and more formal presenting is the need to connect with the people you are speaking to. In both types of communication, the higher quality the connection you establish, the more memorable and impactful the interaction.
However, the definition of public speaking noted above reveals one important difference between presenting and everyday conversation: the structured nature of the communication and the planning that’s needed to create that structure. Casually talking with people around you is typically spontaneous and unstructured.
To be effective, a business presentation needs a clear framework and simple core message to ensure clarity. Because the stakes are higher and you have a time limit, you need to be sure your audience will clearly understand and remember the key point of what you have to say. That’s why advance preparation for your presentation is so essential: it allows you to  build appropriate structure to best serve the needs of your audience.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

How to stare down your tigers and become a fearless leader

Don’t fixate on problems — anticipate them
On a motorcycle, you must be ready to adjust to dangers — a pothole here, a large stone there. But if you focus only on the hazards, you’ll miss the scenery. Prepare, but not to the point of paralysis.
In business, it’s tempting to catastrophize, worrying about things that will probably never happen. And all that worry makes us more anxious. An intriguing study asked people whether they would rather receive a series of mild shocks over 15 minutes or one larger shock. The latter appealed to 70% of participants: Most people would rather take their lumps at once than wait for the other shoe to drop.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Getting beyond bureaucracy in human resources

Getting beyond bureaucracy in human resources | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Operating with an edge

It’s easy to say, “HR needs to let go and get out of the way,” but the pendulum can easily swing too far in the other direction: granting managers unlimited freedom in making HR decisions can generate too much variability, potential liability exposure, and cost creep. Moreover, when HR pulls back too far, it misses opportunities for using rigor and facts to gain predictive insights, whose potential is growing with big data and advanced analytics.1
Talent pools and gaps

High-quality, timely information about talent pools and gaps represents a competitive advantage that HR is uniquely positioned to provide. For example, a grocery line manager in a global retail organization may have proved herself in Argentina just as a gap opened up in Mexico. An oil and gas organization may have a budding leader who is running out of growth headroom in the Middle East and a need for similar expertise in a bigger role in Houston. HR should ensure that these critical connections get made and then help line managers seize opportunities. The best HR organizations also offer a perspective on emerging gaps. For example, as digitization becomes more critical to cars,2 leading automakers need to put more emphasis on recruiting computer engineers—a challenge for organizations accustomed to recruiting mechanical engineers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Compelling Reasons to Be Authentic Not Rude

Compelling Reasons to Be Authentic Not Rude | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Compelling Reasons to Be Authentic Not Rude
Authenticity is a courageous and generous gift while rudeness robs people of dignity. Generosity will always outpace robbery.

Authenticity connects while rudeness disconnects. Connection takes you places that disconnection can’t.

Authenticity builds trust while rudeness undermines it. Without trust, you’re nowhere. This is one of the most compelling reasons to be authentic not rude.

Authenticity removes people’s fears of being conned while rudeness is a form of conning others. Don’t be fooled into thinking that rude negative people are easier to trust.

Authenticity speaks the truth by filtering out personal bias. Rudeness dumps personal bias on others. Dumping never builds positive relationships.

Authenticity shows maturity and emotional intelligence while rudeness screams out selfishness and immaturity. How often do you want to be around selfishness?

Authenticity respects others and their views while rudeness disrespects them. Respect avoids inflicting scars that could otherwise haunt *you forever. The power of respect is one of the most compelling reasons to be authentic not rude.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

How to Motivate Yourself When You’re Exhausted

How to Motivate Yourself When You’re Exhausted | digitalNow | Scoop.it
If you’re feeling exhausted and discouraged by the mountain ahead I encourage you to gather your team and reflect on what’s better now than 6 months ago?

How has the customer experience improved?
What processes are more streamlined?
How is your team stronger (leadership, hiring, skills?)
What do you know now that you didn’t know then?
How are you showing up as a better human being?
What accomplishments are you most proud of?
Yes, yes, look up, and plan. But never underestimate the power of a good pause to look down the mountain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

How to Create a Rising Tide of Talent Within Your Organization

Work together to determine which description best describes the current ranking of each department.

1. Talent Rich Departments
Talent rich departments employ mostly above average people, many of who are top talent in their fields of expertise. These people consistently do high quality work, often exceeding expectations and beating deadlines. Numerous advancement opportunities are almost always filled from within, creating new job opportunities. These jobs are filled quickly from a pipeline filled with high quality job candidates.

2. Talent Strong Departments
Talent strong departments employ people who are at least average at what they do. Some of these employees are top talent in their fields of expertise. They do quality work that meets expectations and deadlines. Advancement opportunities are frequently filled from within, creating new job opportunities. Some open jobs are filled quickly from a pipeline of talent. Other jobs take longer to fill, delaying promotions until new employees are found.

3. Talent Stable Departments
Talent stable departments have a mixture of average and below average performers. Just a few, if any, employees would be designated as top talent. The performance of these employees is typically adequate, although they can struggle to meet expectations and deadlines. Advancement opportunities, when they occur, are sometimes filled from within. When jobs become open, it usually takes days to fill some of them, weeks or months to fill the rest. Promotions are often delayed or even cancelled when backfilling a role takes too long.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

 In search of the minimum viable audience

In search of the minimum viable audience
Of course everyone wants to reach the maximum audience. To be seen by millions, to maximize return on investment, to have a huge impact.

And so we fall all over ourselves to dumb it down, average it out, pleasing everyone and anyone.

You can see the problem.

When you seek to engage with everyone, you rarely delight anyone. And if you're not the irreplaceable, essential, one-of-a-kind changemaker, you never get a chance to engage with the market.

The solution is simple but counterintuitive: Stake out the smallest market you can imagine. The smallest market that can sustain you, the smallest market you can adequately serve. This goes against everything you learned in capitalism school, but in fact, it's the simplest way to matter.

When you have your eyes firmly focused on the minimum viable audience, you will double down on all the changes you seek to make. Your quality, your story and your impact will all get better.

And then, ironically enough, the word will spread.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

The Five Steps All Leaders Must Take in the Age of Uncertainty

The Five Steps All Leaders Must Take in the Age of Uncertainty | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Change in Perspective Needed

We believe business leaders need a new mental model to better understand the complex interplay between companies, economies, and societies. To do so, they must shift their focus to the broader business and social ecosystems in which their companies are embedded. These ecosystems are nested complex adaptive systems: multilevel, interconnected, dynamic systems hosting local interactions that can give rise to unpredictable global effects and vice versa. Acknowledging the unpredictability, nonlinearity, and circularity of cause-and-effect relationships within these systems is a notable departure from the simpler, linear models that underpin traditional mechanistic management thinking.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Companies Must Prepare for More Ransomware Attacks

Cyber-security teams need to brace themselves for more action: Ransomware attacks are likely to increase during the second half of this year, according to a recent survey conducted by ISACA (Information Systems Audit and Control Association), a nonprofit group for IT and information systems professionals. More than four out of five survey respondents expect an upsurge in attacks, and most of them said they are at least somewhat prepared. Still, about one-fourth admit that they aren't ready, and fully half have not trained their employees to deal with ransomware. That's risky, warns ISACA CEO Matt Loeb, who says, "WannaCry, Petya, Cryptolocker … ransomware will continue to be news and become the norm. What's needed is protection before an attack—not just a swift recovery afterwards." Besides educating employees, enterprises should be more aggressive in applying software patches, which Loeb sees as critical to protecting an organization from the crippling consequences of an attack. The majority of organizations in the study have not yet experienced a ransomware attack, and only a very small minority of respondents said their organization would pay the ransom if it were hit. Still, complacency is dangerous. "Don't assume your enterprise 'might' be a victim of ransomware," Loeb stresses. "Assume it will. Every organization needs to focus on being prepared for the next ransomware attack, through training, frequent software updates or hiring highly skilled staff." The survey included 448 respondents. About half the participating organizations have fewer than 1,500 employees, 23 percent have 1,500 to 9,999, and 28 percent have 10,000 or more workers. They represent a wide range of industries, with financial/banking firms and technology services/consulting firms leading the way. The survey group covers the globe.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

A business leader’s guide to agile

A business leader’s guide to agile | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Senior executives often tend to assume that after they set overarching digital goals, it’s up to IT to deliver on them quickly through a range of initiatives. In their view, agility is something for R&D engineers and software developers only. The business units hold fast to tried-and-true methods for communicating with IT—throwing their requirements “over the wall” and waiting for IT to build and deliver finished products. The IT organization ends up operating with limited information from the business, the business units lose their opportunity to steer technology development toward desired goals, and agility stalls.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

The 2 best tools for building an engaged workforce

After years of studying employees at all organizational levels and examining the drivers of engagement most likely to motivate a company’s best and brightest, what I’ve learned boils down to four simple and unalterable realities:
Beyond a certain baseline level of pay and perks, giving your employees more money will not guarantee their engagement and loyalty, nor will it help them develop that essential connection between their own purpose and passions and the job you’re asking them to perform.
Millennials and baby boomers have more in common than leaders might expect. Both groups are searching for more personal fulfillment from their jobs and are becoming increasingly unwilling to settle for less.
As a leader, you have the capacity and the responsibility for shaping a work culture of engagement. Purpose and passion are the two best tools in your leadership arsenal for crafting that culture.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Few Marketers Prioritize Revenue Metrics Over Engagement Metrics in Measuring Social Media Success 

By far the biggest challenge for social media marketers is measuring ROI, according to a new Simply Measured report [download page], with the many also struggling to tie social to business goals. Faced with an inability to quantify revenues driven by social, few are using revenue and conversion metrics as their standards.
In its latest annual “The State of Social Marketing” report, Simply Measured surveyed more than 2,700 social media marketing professionals across the globe with a variety of job titles and from a mix of company sizes (though a bare majority were from companies with up to 50 employees).
Respondents were asked which of 4 types of metrics they use most often to measure the success of social media.
Some 58% reported that they use engagement metrics (such as likes, comments, shares, retweets, etc) as their standard of success. The use of this as a typical metric varied little between brand and agency professionals

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

How Silent Meditation Helped Me Succeed at Work 

How Silent Meditation Helped Me Succeed at Work  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Yes, you read that right. Silent meditation. One might ask: Isn’t it obvious that you are almost always silent when you mediate? Yes, but what I mean by silent meditation is the technique referred to as Vipassana (which means to see things the way they are), one of India’s most ancient meditation techniques. I learned it over a 10-day course at Igatpuri in Western India, among the world’s largest meditation centers and the main center of Vipassana’s rapidly growing global community of practitioners. Participants in the course stay silent for 10 days. They do not utter a word (unless there is an emergency); make no gestures or facial expressions; and they commit to spending 10 to 12 hours a day meditating between 5 a.m. and 8 p.m. (with a few breaks in between).

Imagine a day without your phone or an internet connection; a day when you don’t communicate with another person or say a single word. A day without anyone you know around you. Now multiply that by 10. That is a Vipassana meditation course. It is by far the toughest thing I have done in my life. I believe it is one of my most significant achievements.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Merge to grow: Realizing the full commercial potential of your merger 

Merge to grow: Realizing the full commercial potential of your merger  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Establish a central team staffed with ‘A-players’

In a recent McKinsey survey of 1,600 M&A executives,2 we found that more than 70 percent of those who meet or exceed their revenue-synergy goals establish what we call a commercial integration management office (IMO). This group, which is ideally established soon after announcement and well before close, is responsible and accountable for the overall commercial integration effort.

Too often, however, we see companies staff the integration team with those who happen to be available or are part of special-projects groups, often including part-time team members who lack the necessary skills. An inadequate IMO often results in a failure to prepare the commercial organization for a seamless integration on the first day of the merged company’s existence, i.e., Day One.

To be successful, the IMO needs an integration leader with complete accountability, allocated full-time for the duration of the effort and with the appropriate seniority to guide the integration strategy. The rest of the team should consist of highly skilled A-players who can devote the necessary time and are deeply networked within their respective organizations.

2. Validate the deal model to set realistic targets

It’s crucial that acquiring companies stress test the deal model (see “The artful synergist, or how to get more value from mergers and acquisitions”). In many cases, the expected revenue synergies turn out to be based on little more than gut-level, back-of-the-envelope estimates. For revenue-based deals, such estimates underpinning the projected value of the acquisition can set up potentially unrealistic aspirations. The results of the M&A Capabilities Survey show that some 87 percent of companies whose mergers are successful identify sources of value effectively, vs. only 66 percent of their less successful peers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

The CEO’s guide to competing through HR

The CEO’s guide to competing through HR | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Put people analytics at the core

Many organizations have already built extensive analytics capabilities, typically housed in centers of excellence with some combination of data-science, statistical, systems-knowledge, and coding expertise. Such COEs often provide fresh insights into talent performance, but companies still complain that analytics teams are simple reporting groups—and even more often that they fail to turn their results into lasting value. What’s missing, as a majority of North American CEOs indicated in a recent poll,1 is the ability to embed data analytics into day-to-day HR processes consistently and to use their predictive power to drive better decision making.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong 

People analytics reveals three things HR may be getting wrong  | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Cutting through the hiring noise and bias

The democracy of numbers can also help organizations eliminate unconscious preferences and biases, which can surface even when those responsible have the best of intentions. For instance, a professional-services company had been nearly overwhelmed by the 250,000 job applications it received every year. By introducing more advanced automation, it sought to reduce the costs associated with the initial résumé-screening process, and to improve screening effectiveness. One complication was the aggressive goals the company had simultaneously set for hiring more women, prompting concern that a machine programmed to mine for education and work experience might undermine that effort.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

How to Respond to "We’ve Tried That Before"

How to Respond to "We’ve Tried That Before" | digitalNow | Scoop.it
One of the most common statements you will hear about any change is: “We’ve tried that before.”

Sources of the Statement

There are several possible sources of this statement/sentiment, including, it really has been tried before! Often though, the resister sees similarities to what is being proposed and assumes it to be the same, or the communication about the change hasn’t been very successful and so the assumption is that the proposed change is the same as the past experience.

The Psychology

The basic psychology is pretty straightforward: if we view something as not having worked in the past, why would we want to try it again? Intellectually this is a bad plan!

Remember though, especially if you are the promoter/leader of the change, that your understanding of the change and theirs could be different. You may not have lived through what they are thinking about, or they may not really understand what is being proposed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Playing by the Brain’s Rules to Make Communications Stick

Your brain and mine operate at the level of ideas. If you were to sit through a long presentation, even a great one, and afterwards, I asked you “what was that all about?”… automatically, without even knowing you were doing it, you would reduce that hour to one or two big ideas. It’s how our brains work. They are reductionist. They traffic in ideas. They do NOT traffic at the level of facts and data (especially lots of fact and data).

Do you immediately see the problem? The overwhelming majority of communicators take an approach that is thoroughly at odds with this reality. We bombard our audiences with as much fact and data as we can, usually thinking that we are making the best case we can, when in fact we are likely making the worst.

In the famous OJ Simpson trial of 1993, the prosecution presented a mind-numbing seven months’ worth of fact and data. And yet, history clearly suggests that this was all undone by ONE simple idea of eight words…. “If the glove doesn’t fit, you must acquit”… and the fact that most of you reading immediately recognized the phrase (even after a quarter of a century) is huge testimony to the incredible brain-stickiness of an idea.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

How to Rapidly Resolve Crises in Your Business

To solve the hard problem at the root of your crisis, you need to take a different approach. It involves a strategic sort of patience. You need to do the work to understand the root cause behind your crisis in order to solve it effectively. To find the root cause, you need to stop guessing and use a different set of behaviors.

Know what problem you’re solving. Most crisis response efforts attempt to solve the problem without having defined it well in the first place. Often, problem definitions contain assumptions about the cause of the problem, causing your team to work on the wrong problem altogether. “Our supplier is sending us low quality materials,” or “our core assets are too old” are both problem definitions that assume you already know what’s wrong. Take a step back and define the problem based on what you can observe directly.

Smell the problem. Your first step during the crisis shouldn’t be to try implementing a guessed solution; it should be quickly getting out of the conference room and getting close to the problem to understand it. Pull up data that describes the pattern of the problem, or go to the site of the problem and get familiar with it. If you have unhappy customers, listen in depth to what they’re saying. If you have a supply chain problem, go to the site and record in detail what’s going on.

Stay on target. As you explore the problem, seek to quickly eliminate possible culprits. Investigate it like Sherlock Holmes: instead of trying to confirm a hunch about a suspect, look for evidence that eliminates the possibility that a suspect is the criminal. When you have eliminated all suspects but one, you’ve found your culprit. This relentlessness to eliminate possible root causes will quickly move you towards the true root cause.

When you’ve found the root cause to your crisis, the most effective and efficient solution will become readily apparent. You’ll be able to implement it with greater speed, confidence, and consensus than if you were trying out the best idea that bubbled up in your conference room. To rapidly resolve the crisis in your business, focus your resources on understanding the problem, rather than wasting them trying out guesses that may or may not work.

Learn what skills your team brings to the table in crisis resolution with our free online quiz.
more...
Anita Nason's curator insight, July 24, 8:40 AM

"Rapidly resolving crises in your Business" showed a quirky take on steps to resolve crises in an organisation. When reading through this article, concepts mentioned with how to handle the crises also were similar with OHS techniques. Likewise with reading through OHS material in university courses, this has demonstrated the importance of business units in Organisations' taking responsibility with ensuring OHS is integral in many departments. Moreover why this is of such importance is OHS is everyone's responsibility, not just laying with the Workplace Health and Safety Manager. Likewise as much as possible, I believe all Managers must be present, throughout the workplace. As this keeps the manager at the forefront of business operations.

Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

The End of Corporate Culture as We Know It

The End of Corporate Culture as We Know It | digitalNow | Scoop.it
We are evolving toward the age of networked enterprise, in which the traditional hierarchies of the corporation will be supplanted by self-organizing systems collaborating on digital platforms.

It will be an era of entrepreneurship, distributed leadership, and the continual reorganization of people and resources. It will be a time of disintermediation both within and between organizations. Layers of management will fall; the need for centralized systems and trusted go-betweens will dissipate, if not disappear.

Or so many experts predict.

As for me? Yes, I do believe this is the future toward which we are slowly advancing. Those of us deeper into our careers may not see it come to full fruition during our organizational lives, but the trends are real, and they are already on display if you care to look for them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Don Dea
Scoop.it!

Inspiring Employee Creativity

Inspiring Employee Creativity | digitalNow | Scoop.it
Two types of leaders dominate today’s work environment. “Controllers” prescribe standards, closely drive execution, analyze data that’s produced to progressively refine the standards, and evaluate people on their past performance. “Empowerers” prefer forward-looking discussions with direct reports. They use these to decide what work needs to be done.

Controllers run call centers that record every word and keystroke and require employees to refer to supervisors when issues unanticipated by their scripts arise.1 They see early virtual reality technologies as a tool for shortening training, minimizing on-the-job errors, and avoiding travel for meetings.2 They use dashboard tools to monitor individuals and tasks in real time, ignoring the fact that normal variation, endemic in nature, doesn’t require immediate corrective action.
more...
No comment yet.